Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Senza categoria, Unione Europea

Francia. Il Senato arrostisce Mr Macron a fuoco lento.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-02-22.

Pollo allo Spiedo 001

Il Senato francese è eletto a suffragio indiretto, sta in carica sei anni, e va incontro ad elezioni ogni tre anni.

I 346 senatori sono eletti su base dipartimentale dai deputati e senatori, consiglieri regionali, consiglieri dipartimentali e da delegati dei consigli municipali. Questo sistema elettorale provoca uno sbilanciamento politico nella composizione dei senatori, poiché privilegia le zone rurali della Francia, storicamente più a destra delle zone urbane.

Nelle elezioni tenutesi nel 2017 gli elettori erano quindi quelli che rappresentavano il proscenio politico  di almeno tre anni precedenti, quando La République en Marche! non esisteva ancora.

Come risultato, i Les Républicains hanno ottenuto 146 seggi, il partito socialista 78, l’Unione Centrista 51, più altri gruppi minori. I senatori di La République en Marche! sono solo 21, per lo più transfughi.

I Les Républicains odiano di odio viscerale Mr Macron, cui imputano sia la loro sconfitta alle presidenziali, sia il modo vigliacco con cui il loro candidato Fillon è stato massacrata in sede di campagna elettorale.

Nella vita è più importante non avere nemici piuttosto che avere amici: ed il Senato francese nutre verso il Presidente un livoroso rancore.

Anche se costituzionalmente il Senato ha praticamente gli stessi poteri dell’Assemblea Nazionale, è questa ultima che ha un potere dominante nella formazione delle leggi.

Ma il Senato francese opera anche come controllo sull’azione governativa. Potestà che fa valere secondo opportunità.

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France: Macron’s ex-bodyguard detained as Senate report on ‘Benalla affair’ is due

«The French president’s disgraced senior security aide Alexandre Benalla was placed in provisional detention on Tuesday, his lawyer said, a day before the release of a long-awaited Senate report on the so-called “Benalla affair”.

Investigative magistrates took the decision after President Emmanuel Macron’s former staffer allegedly broke the conditions of his bail, said lawyer Jacqueline Laffont.

Benalla faces criminal charges after it emerged in July that he roughed up protesters during a May Day demonstration in Paris while wearing a police helmet.

The “Benalla affair” sparked a major scandal for Macron, prompting a wave of accusations from opponents that the presidency covered it up.

Benalla was fired after the revelations, but officials are worried he may since have been profiting from his former insider status.

Reports that he continued to use diplomatic passports long after his dismissal led to claims he lied to a Senate committee investigating the case.

After a seven-month investigation, the committee is due to release its findings on Wednesday, coupled with recommendations to avoid a repeat of the “dysfunctions at the highest level of the state” revealed by the case.

Benalla’s lawyer said she had already launched an appeal against her client’s provisional detention.»

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«A French Senate commission demanded Wednesday an investigation into three close aides to President Emmanuel Macron after finding “major flaws” in the government’s handling of a scandal involving security aide Alexandre Benalla»

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«The senators accused the three aides, including Macron’s chief of staff, of contradictions in their testimony over the scandal triggered in July by video footage of former security aide Benalla roughing up protesters during a May Day rally»

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«Their report suggested that chief of staff Patrick Strzoda, presidency secretary Alexis Kohler and security chief Lionel Lavergne may have “withheld significant truth” during their testimony, notably about the remit of Benalla’s role as security adviser, and called on prosecutors to look into their statements»

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«French justice announced on Wednesday they had opened another probe into by former Macron aide Alexandra Benalla for allegedly obstructing investigations by “concealing evidence”.»

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«French justice announced on Wednesday they had opened another probe into by former Macron aide Alexandra Benalla for allegedly obstructing investigations by “concealing evidence”»

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«Benalla, who was already facing criminal charges, was placed in detention on Tuesday for allegedly breaking the conditions of his bail»

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«What happened on May Day now appears to be the tip of the ice»

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«There is no doubt that the indirect relationship between a Russian oligarch and a close aide of the president, who is directly involved in the presidency’s security … would compromise the head of state’s security and, further still, the nation’s interests»

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«Lying to parliament under oath is punishable by up to five years in prison»

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«The commission found Benalla had eight passports, four of them personal and four of them either issued for work or on diplomatic grounds»

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Bene.

Benissimo.

Lentamente ma inesorabilmente il cerchio inizia a restringersi attorno all’élite dell’Eliseo.

Poi, al momento opportuno, sarà il turno del mandante, ossia del Presidente Macron.

Nota.

Gli allibratori di Londra hanno iniziato a tener scommesse su quanto tempo ancora Mr Macron resterà presidente della Francia.


France 24. 2019-02-21. Macron aides grilled in scathing Senate report on ‘Benalla affair’

A French Senate commission demanded Wednesday an investigation into three close aides to President Emmanuel Macron after finding “major flaws” in the government’s handling of a scandal involving security aide Alexandre Benalla.

*

The senators accused the three aides, including Macron’s chief of staff, of contradictions in their testimony over the scandal triggered in July by video footage of former security aide Benalla roughing up protesters during a May Day rally.

Their report suggested that chief of staff Patrick Strzoda, presidency secretary Alexis Kohler and security chief Lionel Lavergne may have “withheld significant truth” during their testimony, notably about the remit of Benalla’s role as security adviser, and called on prosecutors to look into their statements.

The senate’s investigative committee also said it had reason to believe Benalla may have lied to them under oath.

‘Concealing evidence’

French justice announced on Wednesday they had opened another probe into by former Macron aide Alexandra Benalla for allegedly obstructing investigations by “concealing evidence”.

Benalla, who was already facing criminal charges, was placed in detention on Tuesday for allegedly breaking the conditions of his bail, his lawyer Jacqueline Laffont said.

“What happened on May Day now appears to be the tip of the iceberg,” Philippe Bas, a senator from the opposition centre-right Les Républicains party and head of the investigative committee, told reporters.

The committee said Benalla also appeared to have misled senators over his alleged link to a contract between Russian billionaire Iskander Makhmudov and a French security firm, which was revealed by investigative website Mediapart.

There was evidence, the senators said, that Macron’s security and France’s national interests had been put at risk.

“There is no doubt that the indirect relationship between a Russian oligarch and a close aide of the president, who is directly involved in the presidency’s security … would compromise the head of state’s security and, further still, the nation’s interests,” the report read.

The committee recommended that Benalla be prosecuted for perjury during the investigation.

Lying to parliament under oath is punishable by up to five years in prison and a €75,000 fine in France.

French government spokesman Benjamin Griveaux said on Wednesday Macron’s office would reply in due course to the “many untrue elements” in the senate’s findings.

Accusations of presidential cover up

The “Benalla affair” sparked a major scandal for Macron, prompting a wave of accusations from opponents that the presidency covered it up.

The former top security aide was fired after the revelations, but officials are worried he may since have been profiting from his former insider status.

Those concerns were heightened late last year when it emerged that he had continued to use diplomatic passports long after his dismissal. The commission found Benalla had eight passports, four of them personal and four of them either issued for work or on diplomatic grounds.

Benalla’s lawyer said she has launched an appeal against her client’s provisional detention.

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