Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Materie Prime, Russia, Unione Europea

Russia. Nei primi due mesi di conflitto ha raddoppiato i guadagni sullo export EU degli idrocarburi.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-05-18.

2022-05-15__ CREA 001

«Russia nearly doubled its income from energy sales to the EU during wartime, study shows»

Questa frase sintetizza alla perfezione quello che è accaduto nei primi due mesi del conflitto russo-ukraino.

Sembrerebbe che le roboanti sanzioni di Joe Biden abbiano sortito due effetti:

– un immane costo imposto alle e sopportato dalle tasche degli Elettori Contribuenti americani

– il raddoppio dei guadagni della Russia

2022-05-15__ CREA 002

* * * * * *

«Blocco Continentale designa il blocco disposto da Napoleone I, con decreto datato da Berlino il 21 novembre 1806, contro l’Inghilterra, in risposta al blocco (fittizio) contro la Francia e i paesi satelliti dichiarato dall’Inghilterra. Per effetto del b. nessuna nave che provenisse direttamente dall’Inghil­terra o dalle sue colonie poteva più essere accolta nei porti dell’Impero francese. Più tardi, in risposta alle analoghe misure prese dall’Inghilterra, Napoleone con i decreti di Fontainebleau e di Milano (1807) dichiarò confiscabili le navi neutrali che avessero fatto scalo in porti inglesi. Efficace nel biennio 1807-08 (vi aderirono Prussia, Danimarca, Austria, Svezia e Russia), il b. gravò poi pesantemente sulla politica economica e sociale della Francia; dopo il 1809 perdette rapidamente valore.» [Fonte]

Il blocco continentale morì schiacciato dal peso del contrabbando.

* * * * * *


Financing Putin’s war on Europe: Fossil fuel imports from Russia in the first two months of the invasion

Fossil fuel exports are a key enabler of Russia’s military buildup and brutal aggression against Ukraine.

To shed light on who purchases Russia’s oil, gas and coal, and how the volume and value of imports have changed since the start of the invasion, the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air has compiled a detailed dataset of pipeline and seaborne trade in Russian fossil fuels.

                         Key findings include:

– 63 billion EUR worth of fossil fuels were exported via shipments and pipelines from Russia since the beginning of the invasion. The EU imported 71% of this, worth approximately 44 billion EUR.

– The largest importers in order were Germany (EUR 9.1 billion), Italy (EUR 6.9 billion), China (EUR 6.7 billion), Netherlands (EUR 5.6 billion), Turkey (EUR 4.1 billion) and France (EUR 3.8 billion).

– A quarter of Russia’s fossil fuel shipments arrived in just six EU ports: Rotterdam (Netherlands), Maasvlakte (Netherlands), Trieste (Italy), Gdansk (Poland) and Zeebrugge (Belgium).

– Major oil firms, power utilities and industries continued to buy Russian fossil fuels: we detected deliveries to facilities or with ships linked to oil companies Exxon Mobil, Shell, Total, Repsol, BP, Lukoil, Neste and Orlen and Trafigura; power utilities RWE, KEPCO, Taipower, Tohoku Electric Power, Chubu Electric Power, TEPCO, Kyushu Electric Power; and industrial companies Nippon Steel, POSCO, Formosa Petrochemical Corporation, Mitsubishi, Hyundai Steel, Sumitomo and JFE Steel.

– There is a clear pick-up in oil shipments to India, Egypt and other “unusual” destinations for Russian exports. However, the shipments to these new destinations are nowhere near enough to make up for the fall in exports to Europe

– Deliveries of oil to the EU fell by 20% and coal by 40%, while deliveries of LNG increased by 20%. EU gas purchases through pipelines increased by 10%. Oil deliveries to non-EU destinations increased by 20%, and with major changes in destinations. Deliveries of coal and LNG outside the EU increased by 30% and 80%, respectively.

* * * * * * *


Russia Nearly Doubled Its Income From Energy Sales To The EU During Wartime, Study Shows

Moscow continues to benefit from Europe’s energy dependence on Russian oil despite a reduction in sales due to sanctions imposed to pressure it to end its war against Ukraine, according to experts with a Finland-based research organization.

New research by the Center for Research on Energy and Clean Air (CREA) released on April 28 shows that Russia has nearly doubled its revenues from sales of fossil fuels to the EU during the two months of war in Ukraine.

Soaring prices have more than compensated Russia for the loss in sales volume due to sanctions, the research shows.

Researchers at CREA also say new sanctions promise to drive up prices even more, nullifying efforts to prevent Russian President Vladimir Putin from using energy to pressure the EU and to finance the war against Ukraine.

Since the start of the war, Russia has sold 46 billion euros worth of energy resources to the European Union, and the figure continues to rise. This is about twice as much as the amount of sales in the same period in 2021,according to CREA.

Even though there was a decline in the volume of sales, the increase in the price of oil brought Moscow about 63 billion euros ($66 billion) on the energy exported on ships and through pipelines since the invasion was launched on February 24.

According to CREA, the volume of Russian oil imported by the EU fell by 20 percent and coal by 40 percent. However, gas imports grew, and Germany remains the main buyer. During the two months of the war, it imported energy products worth 9 billion euros.

Lauri Millivirta, lead analyst at CREA, said the continued export of energy “is a big hole in the sanctions” and all countries that buy fuel from Russia “become complicit in the monstrous violations of international law committed by the Russian military.”

The only way to stop the war would be a quick and complete rejection of Russian energy carriers, she believes.

The European Parliament in March adopted a resolution calling for an embargo on Russian energy, but so far the European Union has only discussed such an embargo. The EU has imposed an embargo on Russian coal that will take effect from August.

The German government has ruled out a gas embargo because of the economic damage it would cause, but Chancellor Olaf Scholz said on April 28 that Germany must prepare for Russia to suspend gas deliveries.

“Whether and what decision the Russian government will make in this regard is speculation, but…one has to prepare for it,” Scholz said during a visit to Tokyo. The German government already has started preparing for the possibility that Russia will cut off gas supplies, he added.

The CREA research was reported as Russian energy giant Gazprom announced a soaring net profit for last year, citing high energy prices as the main reason for the increase.

Gazprom said in a statement that its net profit hit 2.09 trillion rubles ($29 billion) in 2021, up from 135 billion rubles the year before when profits slumped due to the global pandemic and falling energy prices.

“The main factor that affected the financial result was an increase in gas and oil prices,” the state-controlled company said in a statement.

Global energy prices have soared since last year as economies began emerging from COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns. Prices have risen further in the wake of Russia’s military operation in Ukraine.

Gazprom also forecast a fall in gas output of about 4 percent this year in another sign of the impact of Western sanctions against Moscow.

Gazprom on April 27 announced the halt of gas supplies to EU members Poland and Bulgaria, saying they had violated Putin’s order that payments for gas be made in rubles.

Putin made the demand in retaliation for the West’s economic sanctions against Moscow over the Ukraine conflict.

Although the sanctions had led to an increased level of economic uncertainty in Russia, Gazprom said the situation did not “call into question the consistency” of its operations.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Finanza e Sistema Bancario, Stati Uniti

Biden. Axios fa una impietosa ma realistica analisi. Biden è impotente contro la inflazione.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-05-18.

Biden 001

«Il presidente è in gran parte impotente a far calare l’inflazione»

«Durante le sue osservazioni, Biden ha riconosciuto chiaramente che “alcune delle radici dell’inflazione sono al di fuori del nostro controllo”»

* * * * * * *

«President Biden is blaming three culprits when it comes to controlling inflation: Vladimir Putin, the pandemic and congressional Republicans»

«The problem is: He doesn’t control any of them»

«By conceding he’s mostly powerless to meaningfully reduce inflation, Biden is bracing the country for higher prices»

«He’s also trying to make a case for the Democratic Party — and the remainder of his term — in this fall’s pivotal midterm elections»

«Working down a logic train in his inflation speech Tuesday, the president wanted to convince voters about who’s to blame for soaring prices — whether it’s national gasoline at an all-time high of $4.37/gallon or food prices soaring with each checkout»

«The president is largely powerless to bring down inflation»

«During his remarks, Biden plainly acknowledged “some of the roots of the inflation are outside of our control.”»

«As for direct causes, Biden cited Putin’s invasion of Ukraine and supply-chain snarls caused by the pandemic as the “two major contributors to inflation.”»

«Republicans — as well as Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), who effectively killed Biden’s ambitious spending agenda in December — believe the president’s proposals will increase inflation»

«But he was wrong to omit the important contribution to the problem from excessive fiscal and monetary stimulus»

* * * * * * *

Biden. Sondaggio stratificato di gradimento. A confronto Stalingrado fu un trionfo tedesco.

Biden. Addio al clima. La realtà annichilisce i programmi utopici. Reuters è mutato.

America. Le sanzioni di Joe Biden hanno beneficiato Mr Putin e sono state pagate dagli americani.

India. Prosegue tranquilla a comprare petrolio dalla Russia. Non accetta le sanzioni di Joe Biden.

Biden. È crollato nei sondaggi. Sette su dieci Elettori lo disapprovano. Straparla.

Midterm. Sondaggi per stato. I repubblicani potrebbero vincere il Senato.

America. Wall Street. Da Set21 hanno perso 8.5 trilioni Usd di capitalizzazione.

Biden mette al bando i test anti-satellite. Russia, Cina ed India nemmeno rispondono.

Superpotenze militari. Gli equilibri sono rotti. Una guerra è opzione appetibile.

* * * * * * *

In calce riportiamo una traduzione in lingua italiana.

* * * * * * *


Biden is “powerless” to tame inflation

President Biden is blaming three culprits when it comes to controlling inflation: Vladimir Putin, the pandemic and congressional Republicans. The problem is: He doesn’t control any of them.

Why it matters: By conceding he’s mostly powerless to meaningfully reduce inflation, Biden is bracing the country for higher prices. He’s also trying to make a case for the Democratic Party — and the remainder of his term — in this fall’s pivotal midterm elections.

                         – Working down a logic train in his inflation speech Tuesday, the president wanted to convince voters about who’s to blame for soaring prices — whether it’s national gasoline at an all-time high of $4.37/gallon or food prices soaring with each checkout.

                         – “It is a lot better that he is de facto admitting this than overpromising and underdelivering about a low inflation rate by Election Day,” said Jason Furman, a Harvard economist and chair of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama.

                         – “The president is largely powerless to bring down inflation.”

Driving the news: During his remarks, Biden plainly acknowledged “some of the roots of the inflation are outside of our control.”

He spoke a day before the release of the April Consumer Price Index, in which economists expect an 8.1% inflation rate.

                         – As for direct causes, Biden cited Putin’s invasion of Ukraine and supply-chain snarls caused by the pandemic as the “two major contributors to inflation.”

                         – He also singled out Republicans for their tax plans, saving particular scorn for Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.). The president also blamed “ultra-MAGA Republicans” for blocking his Build Back Better plan, which he claims would lower prices.

                         – Republicans — as well as Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), who effectively killed Biden’s ambitious spending agenda in December — believe the president’s proposals will increase inflation.

Between the lines: Biden was careful not to directly blame the Federal Reserve for the current 8.5% annual inflation rate, but he reminded voters the Fed “plays a primary role in fighting inflation in our country.”

                         – He also was explicit he would “never interfere with the Fed’s judgments.”

                         – Biden’s approach is in contrast to President Trump, who publicly tried to pressure Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell into keeping interest rates low while threatening to fire him.

The big picture: Congressional Republicans and prominent Democratic economists, like Harvard’s Larry Summers, have insisted that pandemic spending has contributed to inflation.

They cite the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill Biden signed into law last March.

                         – Economic experts have also faulted the Fed, which announced its biggest rate hike in history last week, for keeping interest rates too low for too long.

                         – “The president was right to call out Ukraine and COVID as factors in our inflation,” Steve Rattner, a former economic adviser to President Obama, told Axios.

                         – “But he was wrong to omit the important contribution to the problem from excessive fiscal and monetary stimulus.”

                         – “And he overstated the extent to which his current actions and proposals are likely to ameliorate the problem.”

Go deeper: Biden, when directly asked if he bore any responsibility for inflation said, “I think our policies help, not hurt.”

                         – He also cited the FY21 federal deficit, which was $2.8 trillion, as helping to reduce inflation.

                         – It was roughly $350 billion less than Trump’s record $3.1 trillion deficit, in 2020.

The intrigue: Biden hinted his administration is considering reducing some of the China tariffs imposed by Trump — a source of debate inside the administration.

                         – “No decision has been made on it,” he told reporters.

* * * * * * *


Biden è “impotente” a domare l’inflazione

Il Presidente Biden accusa tre colpevoli quando si tratta di controllare l’inflazione: Vladimir Putin, la pandemia e i repubblicani del Congresso. Il problema è che non ne controlla nessuno.

Perché è importante: Ammettendo di essere per lo più impotente a ridurre significativamente l’inflazione, Biden sta preparando il Paese ad un aumento dei prezzi. Inoltre, sta cercando di difendere il Partito Democratico – e il resto del suo mandato – nelle cruciali elezioni di midterm di quest’autunno.

                         – Nel suo discorso sull’inflazione di martedì, il Presidente ha voluto convincere gli elettori di chi sia la colpa dell’impennata dei prezzi, sia che si tratti della benzina ai massimi storici di 4,37 dollari al gallone, sia che si tratti dei prezzi dei generi alimentari che aumentano a ogni controllo.

                         – È molto meglio che lo ammetta de facto, piuttosto che promettere troppo e non dare nulla per un basso tasso di inflazione entro il giorno delle elezioni”, ha dichiarato Jason Furman, economista di Harvard e presidente del Council of Economic Advisers sotto il presidente Obama.

                         – “Il presidente è in gran parte impotente a far scendere l’inflazione”.

La notizia è stata trainata: Durante le sue osservazioni, Biden ha riconosciuto chiaramente che “alcune delle radici dell’inflazione sono al di fuori del nostro controllo”.

Ha parlato un giorno prima della pubblicazione dell’indice dei prezzi al consumo di aprile, per il quale gli economisti prevedono un tasso di inflazione dell’8,1%.

                         – Per quanto riguarda le cause dirette, Biden ha citato l’invasione dell’Ucraina da parte di Putin e le difficoltà di approvvigionamento causate dalla pandemia come i “due principali fattori che contribuiscono all’inflazione”.

                         – Ha anche criticato i repubblicani per i loro piani fiscali, riservando un particolare disprezzo al senatore Rick Scott (R-Fla.). Il Presidente ha anche incolpato “i repubblicani ultra-MAGA” per aver bloccato il suo piano Build Back Better, che secondo lui abbasserebbe i prezzi.

                         – I repubblicani – così come il senatore Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), che a dicembre ha di fatto bloccato l’ambizioso programma di spesa di Biden – ritengono che le proposte del presidente aumenteranno l’inflazione.

Tra le righe: Biden è stato attento a non incolpare direttamente la Federal Reserve per l’attuale tasso di inflazione dell’8,5% annuo, ma ha ricordato agli elettori che la Fed “svolge un ruolo primario nella lotta all’inflazione nel nostro Paese”.

                         – È stato anche esplicito sul fatto che non avrebbe “mai interferito con le decisioni della Fed”.

                         – L’approccio di Biden è in contrasto con il Presidente Trump, che ha cercato pubblicamente di fare pressione sul Presidente della Federal Reserve Jerome Powell affinché mantenesse bassi i tassi di interesse, minacciando di licenziarlo.

Il quadro generale: I repubblicani del Congresso e importanti economisti democratici, come Larry Summers di Harvard, hanno insistito sul fatto che la spesa per la pandemia ha contribuito all’inflazione.

Essi citano il disegno di legge di 1.900 miliardi di dollari per il soccorso al coronavirus che Biden ha firmato lo scorso marzo.

                         – Gli esperti economici hanno anche rimproverato alla Fed, che la scorsa settimana ha annunciato il più grande rialzo dei tassi della storia, di averli tenuti troppo bassi per troppo tempo.

                         – Il presidente ha fatto bene a citare l’Ucraina e il COVID come fattori di inflazione”, ha dichiarato ad Axios Steve Rattner, ex consigliere economico del presidente Obama.

                         – Ma ha sbagliato a tralasciare l’importante contributo al problema di un eccessivo stimolo fiscale e monetario”.

                         – E ha sopravvalutato la misura in cui le sue attuali azioni e proposte sono in grado di migliorare il problema”.

Approfondisci: Biden, alla domanda diretta se fosse responsabile dell’inflazione, ha risposto: “Penso che le nostre politiche aiutino, non danneggino”.

                         – Ha anche citato il deficit federale dell’anno fiscale 21, che era di 2.800 miliardi di dollari, come un aiuto per ridurre l’inflazione.

                         – Si tratta di circa 350 miliardi di dollari in meno rispetto al deficit record di 3.100 miliardi di dollari previsto da Trump per il 2020.

L’intrigo: Biden ha lasciato intendere che la sua amministrazione sta valutando la possibilità di ridurre alcuni dei dazi sulla Cina imposti da Trump – una fonte di dibattito all’interno dell’amministrazione.

                         – “Non è stata presa alcuna decisione in merito”, ha detto ai giornalisti.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Stati Uniti

Usa. Volevano far fallire la Russia e stanno fallendo loro. Persi 11,700 miliardi.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-05-17.

2022-05-17__ Wall Street 001

Il 23 settembre 2021 la capitalizzazione totale del mercato azionario americano ammontava a 54,700 miliardi di dollari.

Il 13 maggio 2022 la capitalizzazione totale del mercato azionario americano ammontava a 43,000 miliardi di dollari.

Nel corso di questi mesi Wall Street ha perso 11,700 miliardi di dollari, ossia il 21.39 percento del suo valore iniziale.

2022-05-17__ Wall Street 002

* * *

Esaminando gli andamenti degli indici della borsa di New York, si constata come in sei mesi il Dow Jones abbia perso il -10.92%, il Nasdaq il -25.54%, S&P 500 il 14.07%, il Russell 2000 il -25.33%.

* * * * * * *

Le borse americane erano sicuramente in bolla, destinata quindi a deflagrare.

Per anni la Fed ha iniettato nel sistema enormi liquidità, che in ultima analisi hanno solo alimentato la speculazione, facendo crescere il debito a dismisura.

Ma questo non è l’unico fattore.

Il Producer Price Index, Ppi, vale adesso 11.0% e l’indice dei prezzi al consumo, Cpi, quota 8.3%.

La inflazione è in continua crescita e costituisce il maggiore problema del Cittadino Contribuente Elettore. Ma anche della Fed.

Il sistema economico, finanziario e produttivo americano si trova in un pericoloso equilibrio metastabile.

Con questo tasso di inflazione ed il crollo delle borse sono entrati in crisi i fondi pensioni. I loro capitali erano in gran parte allocati in azioni. Non solo. Ma le quote versate sono falcidiate dalla inflazione, esitando così in una operazione in netta perdita. Il destino dei fondi pensioni è appeso ad un filo di ragno, ma questa è una altra bolla destinata a scoppiare.

A peggiorare la situazione si dovrebbe aggiungere che mancano cinque mesi alle elezioni di midterm, ove tutti i sondaggi sono concordi nel suggerire che i repubblicani possano conquistare sia il Congresso sia il Senato. La popolarità di Joe Biden è molto bassa.

Da mesi Joe Biden conduce assieme ai partner della Nato una guerra asimmetrica, per procura, contro la Russia.

Ma sanzioni e guerra costano, e chi paga è il Contribuente Elettore americano.

Il sistema delle sanzioni imposte si è rivelato essere più costoso per il Contribuente Elettore che non per la Russia, che ha prontamente dirottato su Cina ed India le materie prima che l’occidente liberal rifiuta di comprare.

Le speranze di Joe Biden di far fallire la Russia con un blitz finanziario sono naufragate.

Joe Biden ha più solo cinque mesi di tempo, prima di tramutarsi in una anatra zoppa.

Di qui il crescendo della aggressività della Nato.

* * * * * * *

Orbene.

Tutti questi dati concorrono a rendere sempre più plausibile un ulteriore crollo della situazione economica americana. 

Avrebbe dovuto fallire la Russia ed invece stanno fallendo gli Stati Uniti.

* * * * * * *

Africa. Le sanzioni di Joe Biden rendono appetibili i metalli africani anche in zone pericolose.

Usa. Calo della immigrazione riduce il lavoro a basso costo e causa aumenti dei prezzi.

California. Corrente elettrica insufficiente. Mantiene in funzione la centrale atomica.

Usa. Sanzioni alla Russia. Dal 23 settembre sono costate 10,400 miliardi ai Contribuenti.

Fondi Pensioni ed Inflazione. Il macello è già iniziato. L’inflazione li falcia senza pietà.

Biden. Sondaggio stratificato di gradimento. A confronto Stalingrado fu un trionfo tedesco.

Usa. Lo spettro della depressione è sempre più probabile. – Goldman Sachs Group.

Biden. Addio al clima. La realtà annichilisce i programmi utopici. Reuters è mutato.

America. Le sanzioni di Joe Biden hanno beneficiato Mr Putin e sono state pagate dagli americani.

Usa.  Si sta avviando a passo fermo verso una nuova depressione. – Bloomberg.

Usa. 81% degli adulti teme la inflazione e la recessione questo anno.

Biden. È crollato nei sondaggi. Sette su dieci Elettori lo disapprovano. Straparla.

Biden. Presidential Approval Index rating of -30.

Stati Uniti. Anno 2021. Import, Export, Macrodati. Le sanzioni sono temibili ma controproducenti.

Recessione. Gli investitori devono prepararsi ad una nuova grande depressione.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo

Italia. Paghiamo più pensioni che buste paga. L’Italia che marcia verso il default.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-05-16.

Pensioni ed occupati 001

L’Ufficio Studi della Ciga ha pubblicato una interessante elaborazione che collega il numero delle pensioni erogate al numero degli occupati.

Pensioni ed occupati 002

* * * * * * *

Pensioni ed occupati 003

Il modello pensionistico italiano è basato sul regime tecnico-finanziario della ripartizione pura in quanto i contributi versati dal settore produttivo, aziende e lavoratori, sono utilizzati per pagare le pensioni in essere senza alcun accumulo di capitale; il sistema risulta in equilibrio solo quando, annualmente, il flusso delle entrate contributive è sufficiente ad erogare le prestazioni.

In poche parole, i contributi versati dagli occupati sono usati per pagare le pensioni in atto.

Per evitare di andare in deficit, poi al momento ripianato dallo stato, sarebbe necessario che il rapporto occupati / pensioni erogate fosse almeno maggiore a 10.

Pensioni ed occupati 004

* * * * * * *


Causa covid, ora paghiamo piu’ pensioni che buste paga.

Con un notevole grado di certezza, fa sapere l’Ufficio studi della CGIA, possiamo affermare che il numero delle pensioni erogate in Italia ha superato quello degli occupati 1. In virtù degli ultimi dati disponibili, se nello scorso mese di maggio coloro che avevano un impiego lavorativo sono scesi a 22,77 milioni di unità 2, gli assegni pensionistici erogati sono superiori.

Al 1° gennaio 2019, infatti, la totalità delle pensioni erogate in Italia ammontava a 22,78 milioni. Se teniamo conto del normale flusso in uscita dal mercato del lavoro da parte di chi ha raggiunto il limite di età e dell’impulso dato dall’introduzione di “quota 100”, successivamente all’ 1 gennaio dell’anno scorso il numero complessivo delle pensioni è aumentato almeno di 220 mila unità. Pertanto, possiamo affermare con una elevata dose di sicurezza che gli assegni stanziati alle persone in quiescenza sono attualmente superiori al numero di occupati presenti nel Paese. Sottolinea il coordinatore dell’Ufficio studi Paolo Zabeo:

“Il sorpasso è avvenuto in questi ultimi mesi. Dopo l’esplosione del Covid, infatti, è seguito un calo dei lavoratori attivi. Con più pensioni che impiegati, operai e autonomi, in futuro non sarà facile garantire la sostenibilità della spesa previdenziale che attualmente supera i 293 miliardi di euro all’anno, pari al 16,6 per cento del Pil. Con culle vuote e un’età media della popolazione sempre più elevata, nei prossimi decenni avremo una società meno innovativa, meno dinamica e con un livello e una qualità dei consumi interni in costante diminuzione”.

Sebbene gli effetti della crisi dovuta al Covid avranno un impatto molto negativo dal punto di vista occupazionale, è evidente che il progressivo invecchiamento della popolazione italiana sarà un altro grosso problema con il quale fare i conti. Afferma il segretario della CGIA Renato Mason:

“Negli ultimi anni gli imprenditori stanno cercando personale altamente qualificato o figure caratterizzate da bassi livelli di competenze. Se per i primi le difficoltà di reperimento sono strutturali a causa dello scollamento che in alcune aree del Paese si è creato tra la scuola e il mondo del lavoro, i secondi, invece, sono posti di lavoro che spesso i nostri giovani, peraltro sempre meno numerosi, rifiutano di occupare e solo in parte vengono coperti dagli stranieri. Una situazione che con la depressione economica alle porte potrebbe assumere dimensioni più contenute, sebbene in prospettiva futura la difficoltà di incrociare la domanda e l’offerta di lavoro rimarrà una questione non facile da risolvere”.

                         Al Sud tutte le regioni presentano un saldo negativo

Sebbene gli ultimi dati disponibili a livello territoriale non siano recentissimi 4, tutte le otto regioni del Sud presentano un numero di pensioni superiore a quello degli occupati (vedi Tab. 1). Tra le province meridionali solo tre registrano un saldo positivo, ovvero più lavoratori attivi che pensioni erogate. Esse sono: Teramo, Ragusa e Cagliari (vedi Tab. 2).

Al Nord, invece, l’unica regione in “difficoltà” è la Liguria, che ha tutte le 4 province con il saldo negativo e il Friuli Venezia Giulia che ha un saldo pari a zero. Al Centro, invece, male anche l’Umbria e le Marche. Ovviamente, le situazioni più problematiche si registrano nelle aree dove l’età media è più avanzata. A livello regionale quella più elevata si trova in Liguria (48,46 anni medi). Subito dopo scorgiamo il Friuli Venezia Giulia (47), il Piemonte (46,54), la Toscana (46,52) e l’Umbria (46,49). A livello provinciale, invece, la realtà più “vecchia” d’Italia è Savona (48,85 anni medi), seguono Biella (48,70), Ferrara (48,55), Genova (48,53) e Trieste (48,39). Le più giovani, invece, sono Bolzano (42,30), Crotone (42,18), Caserta (41,35) e Napoli (41,31).

                         L’invecchiamento un problema che riguarda tutti i paesi avanzati

La questione dell’invecchiamento della popolazione non è un problema solo italiano. Riguarda, purtroppo, la stragrande maggioranza dei paesi più avanzati economicamente. Giappone e Germania, ad esempio, presentano degli indicatori demografici molto simili ai nostri. Ricordiamo che il problema è stato messo all’ordine del giorno addirittura nel G20 tenutosi ad Osaka l’anno scorso che l’ha definito, per la prima volta nella storia, un rischio globale.

Per quali ragioni i grandi della terra si sono occupati di demografia ? Per il semplice fatto che l’80 per cento degli over 65 vive nelle 20 economie maggiormente sviluppate che insieme producono l’85 per cento del Pil mondiale e, più degli altri, potrebbero beneficiare del “dividendo demografico” generato dai paesi emergenti. In questi ultimi, al contrario, va aumentando la coorte in piena età lavorativa (30-55 anni) ad un ritmo superiore rispetto alla capacità del sistema economico locale di creare posti di lavoro e, pertanto, non viene assorbita dal mercato del lavoro.

Pertanto, come dicevamo più sopra, il fenomeno dell’invecchiamento della popolazione è rilevante non solo per le conseguenze sociali ma anche per quelle economiche in termini di spesa sanitaria e di sostenibilità del sistema pensionistico. In particolare, i consumi degli over 60 sono mediamente più alti rispetto a quelli degli under 30 nel comparto dell’alimentazione, della casa e della salute. Ma in tutti gli altri settori, il divario è ad appannaggio delle classi demografiche più giovani che, però, anche in Italia si stanno contraendo paurosamente.

Con le culle vuote e l’assenza di politiche migratorie di ampio respiro corriamo il pericolo che il Vecchio Continente venga travolto da queste problematiche. L’Europa ha bisogno disperatamente di più bambini e di più persone al lavoro che possano sostenere gli anziani a riposo o bisognosi di cure. E’ necessario far venire alla luce nuove risorse e di attrarne di già disponibili. L’Ufficio studi della CGIA conclude:

“Investire per favorire le nascite, purtroppo, è una scelta che non piace a molti governi, spesso in virtù di un banale calcolo statistico, considerato che proprio la tendenza demografica declinante richiede sempre maggiori risorse a favore della parte elettoralmente più rilevante della popolazione. Ma la tentazione della rendita è di per sé un indicatore evidente di declino e di sconfitta”.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Geopolitica Africa, Materie Prime

Africa. Le sanzioni di Joe Biden rendono appetibili i metalli africani anche in zone pericolose.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-05-15.

Gufo_019__

«con il 7% della fornitura globale di nichel della Russia, il 10% del platino del mondo e il 25-30% del palladio del mondo fuori dal mercato internazionale, i ricchi depositi africani di questi metalli iniziano a sembrare molto più attraenti»

«Le sanzioni occidentali alla Russia per la sua invasione dell’Ucraina stanno costringendo le catene di approvvigionamento dei metalli a riconfigurarsi lungo le linee geopolitiche»

I paesi dell’enclave liberal occidentale stanno imbattendosi in una critica carenza di carenza di metalli, carenza che è effetto del blocco delle esportazioni di tali beni da loro stessi imposto alla Russia.

Ma se le miniere africane possono offrire ragionevoli ancorché rischiose possibilità di approvvigionamento, il loro sfruttamento non risolve certamente la carenza attuale.

Senza materie prime la produzione chiude i battenti.

Con un Ppi al 37% il blocco europeo sta agonizzando.

I Contribuenti dell’enclave socialista stanno pagando un ben alto prezzo.

La Russia?

Esporta con gioia il suo surplus minerario alla Cina ed all’India. Non ha perso un centesimo.

* * * * * * *

In calce riportiamo una traduzione in lingua italiana dell’allegato articolo.

* * * * * * *


«Global scramble for metals thrusts Africa into mining spotlight»

«The need to secure new sources of metals for the energy transition amid sanctions on top producer Russia has increased the Africa risk appetite for major miners, who have few alternatives to the resource-rich continent»

«Companies and investors are considering projects they may have previously overlooked, while governments are also looking to Africa, anxious to ensure their countries can procure enough metals to feed an accelerating net-zero push»

«The reality is that the resources the world wants are typically located in difficult places»

«The United States has voiced support for new domestic mines, but projects have stalled»

«Certainly, the risks of mining in sub-Saharan Africa remain high»

«The acute security challenge facing mines in the gold-rich Sahel region was highlighted last month when Russia’s Nordgold abandoned its Taparko gold mine in Burkina Faso over an increasing threat from militants»

«And even in the continent’s most industrialised economy, South Africa, deteriorating rail infrastructure is forcing some coal producers to resort to trucking their product to ports»

«Yet with Russia’s 7% of global nickel supply, 10% of the world’s platinum, and 25-30% of the world’s palladium off the table, Africa’s rich deposits of those metals start looking a lot more attractive»

«Western sanctions on Russia over its invasion of Ukraine are forcing metals supply chains to reconfigure along geopolitical lines»

* * * * * * *


Global scramble for metals thrusts Africa into mining spotlight

Ohannesburg, May 8 (Reuters) – The need to secure new sources of metals for the energy transition amid sanctions on top producer Russia has increased the Africa risk appetite for major miners, who have few alternatives to the resource-rich continent.

Companies and investors are considering projects they may have previously overlooked, while governments are also looking to Africa, anxious to ensure their countries can procure enough metals to feed an accelerating net-zero push.

This year’s Investing in African Mining Indaba conference, which runs May 9-12 in Cape Town, will see the highest-ranking U.S. government official in years attending, organisers say, as well as representatives from the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals Corporation (JOGMEC), in a sign of rich countries’ rising concern about securing supply.

“The reality is that the resources the world wants are typically located in difficult places,” said Steven Fox, executive chairman of New York-based political risk consultancy Veracity Worldwide.

The U.S. administration wants to position itself as a strong supporter of battery metals projects in sub-Saharan Africa, he said.

“While Africa presents its challenges, those challenges are no more difficult than the corresponding set of challenges in Canada. It may be easier to actually bring a project to fruition in Africa, than in a place like Canada or the U.S.,” he added.

The United States has voiced support for new domestic mines, but projects have stalled. Rio Tinto’s  Resolution copper project, for example, was halted over Native American claims on the land, and conservation issues.

Certainly, the risks of mining in sub-Saharan Africa remain high. The acute security challenge facing mines in the gold-rich Sahel region was highlighted last month when Russia’s Nordgold abandoned its Taparko gold mine in Burkina Faso over an increasing threat from militants.

And even in the continent’s most industrialised economy, South Africa, deteriorating rail infrastructure is forcing some coal producers to resort to trucking their product to ports.

Yet with Russia’s 7% of global nickel supply, 10% of the world’s platinum, and 25-30% of the world’s palladium off the table, Africa’s rich deposits of those metals start looking a lot more attractive.

“As a mining company, there aren’t many opportunities and if you are going to grow, you’re going to have to look at riskier countries,” said George Cheveley, portfolio manager at Ninety One.

“Clearly, after Russia-Ukraine people are more sensitive to geopolitical risk and you cannot predict which projects are going to work out and which are not,” he added.

Kabanga Nickel, a project in Tanzania, secured funding from global miner BHP  in January, and CEO Chris Showalter said it is seeing increased demand from potential offtakers.

Western sanctions on Russia over its invasion of Ukraine are forcing metals supply chains to reconfigure along geopolitical lines, Showalter said.

“Not everyone’s going to be able to get clean battery metals from a friendly jurisdiction, so I think some difficult decisions will have to be made, and it is going to force people to make some new decisions about where they want to source.”

* * * * * * *


La corsa globale ai metalli spinge l’Africa sotto i riflettori dell’industria mineraria

Ohannesburg, 8 maggio (Reuters) – La necessità di assicurarsi nuove fonti di metalli per la transizione energetica in mezzo alle sanzioni sul produttore principale Russia ha aumentato l’appetito di rischio Africa per i principali minatori, che hanno poche alternative al continente ricco di risorse.

Le aziende e gli investitori stanno prendendo in considerazione progetti che potrebbero aver trascurato in precedenza, mentre i governi stanno anche guardando all’Africa, ansiosi di garantire che i loro paesi possano procurarsi abbastanza metalli per alimentare una spinta netta-zero in accelerazione.

La conferenza Investing in African Mining Indaba di quest’anno, che si svolge dal 9 al 12 maggio a Città del Capo, vedrà la partecipazione del più alto funzionario del governo degli Stati Uniti da anni, dicono gli organizzatori, così come i rappresentanti della Japan Oil, Gas and Metals Corporation (JOGMEC), in un segno della crescente preoccupazione dei paesi ricchi di garantire l’approvvigionamento.

“La realtà è che le risorse che il mondo vuole sono tipicamente situate in luoghi difficili”, ha detto Steven Fox, presidente esecutivo della società di consulenza sui rischi politici Veracity Worldwide con sede a New York.

L’amministrazione degli Stati Uniti vuole posizionarsi come un forte sostenitore dei progetti sui metalli delle batterie nell’Africa sub-sahariana, ha detto.

“Mentre l’Africa presenta le sue sfide, quelle sfide non sono più difficili del corrispondente insieme di sfide in Canada. Può essere più facile portare a compimento un progetto in Africa che in un posto come il Canada o gli Stati Uniti”, ha aggiunto.

Gli Stati Uniti hanno espresso il loro sostegno per nuove miniere nazionali, ma i progetti si sono arenati. Il progetto di rame Resolution di Rio Tinto, per esempio, è stato fermato per le rivendicazioni dei nativi americani sulla terra e per questioni di conservazione.

Certamente, i rischi dell’attività mineraria nell’Africa sub-sahariana rimangono alti. L’acuta sfida alla sicurezza delle miniere nella regione del Sahel, ricca d’oro, è stata evidenziata il mese scorso quando la russa Nordgold ha abbandonato la sua miniera d’oro Taparko in Burkina Faso a causa della crescente minaccia dei militanti.

E anche nell’economia più industrializzata del continente, il Sudafrica, il deterioramento delle infrastrutture ferroviarie sta costringendo alcuni produttori di carbone a ricorrere ai camion per trasportare il loro prodotto nei porti.

Tuttavia, con il 7% della fornitura globale di nichel della Russia, il 10% del platino del mondo e il 25-30% del palladio del mondo fuori dal tavolo, i ricchi depositi africani di questi metalli iniziano a sembrare molto più attraenti.

“Come azienda mineraria, non ci sono molte opportunità e se vuoi crescere, devi guardare a paesi più rischiosi”, ha detto George Cheveley, portfolio manager di Ninety One.

“Chiaramente, dopo Russia-Ucraina la gente è più sensibile al rischio geopolitico e non si può prevedere quali progetti andranno bene e quali no”, ha aggiunto.

Kabanga Nickel, un progetto in Tanzania, si è assicurato un finanziamento da BHP a gennaio, e il CEO Chris Showalter ha detto che sta vedendo un aumento della domanda da parte di potenziali acquirenti.

Le sanzioni occidentali alla Russia per la sua invasione dell’Ucraina stanno costringendo le catene di approvvigionamento dei metalli a riconfigurarsi lungo le linee geopolitiche, ha detto Showalter.

“Non tutti saranno in grado di ottenere metalli puliti per batterie da una giurisdizione amica, quindi penso che alcune decisioni difficili dovranno essere prese, e questo costringerà le persone a prendere alcune nuove decisioni su dove vogliono approvvigionarsi”.

Pubblicato in: Demografia, Devoluzione socialismo, Senza categoria, Stati Uniti

Usa. Calo della immigrazione riduce il lavoro a basso costo e causa aumenti dei prezzi.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-05-14.

2022-05-10__ Immigrazione 001

Vi sono dei dati di fatto contro i quali si infrangono tutte le idee preconcette. La realtà fattuale stritola.

US birth rate falls 4% to its lowest point ever

«The American birth rate fell for the sixth consecutive year in 2020, with the lowest number of babies born since 1979, according to a new report.

Some 3.6 million babies were born in the US in 2020 – marking a 4% decline from the year before, found the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics.

The slump was seen across all recorded ethnicities and origins, according to the findings»

Attualmente il tasso di fertilità si attesta a 1.7, valore ben al di sotto di quello necessario a mantenere una popolazione in equilibrio.

Alla carenza di giovani si associa la disaffezione a voler fare lavori anche poco retribuiti. Si tende a vivere utilizzando i risparmi, sia pur essi falcidiati dalla inflazione.

* * * * * * *

Sotto questa luce appare essere evidente quanto sia ampio il problema della immigrazione, fornendo gli immigrati una manodopera non in pianta e sottopagata spesso ai limiti della sussistenza.

Per essere chiari, negli Stati Uniti la immigrazione è vista come una nuova forma di schiavitù.

Ma Nemesi è spietata.

Alla carenza della manodopera immigrata si associa una levitazione dei costi di produzione, elemento questo che concorre a fare aumentare il tasso di inflazione.

Siamo franchi: gli Stati Uniti si reggono anche su questa nuova forma di schiavitù

* * * * * * *

In calce riportiamo una traduzione in lingua italiana dell’accluso articolo.

* * * * * * *

«Shortage of immigrant labor raises prices in the US»

«About 10 miles (16 kilometers) from the Rio Grande, Mike Helle’s farm suffers from such a shortage of migrant workers that he has replaced 450 acres (180 hectares) of leafy greens, which are harvested by hand, with crops that can be harvest with machines»

«In Houston, Al Flores raised prices at his restaurant because the cost of meat doubled due to a lack of immigrant staff on the production lines of the meatpacking plants»

«In the Dallas area, Joshua Correa raised the prices of homes built by his company by $150,000 due in part to cost increases caused by a lack of immigrant labor»

«It is estimated that the country has two million fewer immigrants than it would have if the rate had been maintained»

«This has sparked a desperate dispute over labor in many sectors, including meatpacking and home construction, which also contributes to shortages and price increases.»

«In the short term, we will adjust to that deficit in the labor market through increases in wages and prices»

«The labor factor is one of those that contribute to the United States suffering its highest inflation in the last 40 years; others are the disruptions in supply chains due to the coronavirus pandemic and the increase in fuel and raw material prices since the Russian invasion of Ukraine»

«Given the sharp decline in birth rates over the past two decades, some economists forecast that the potential labor force will begin to shrink by 2025»

«A recent Gallup poll reveals that fears of unauthorized immigration are the highest in two decades»

«With the November midterm elections looming, which will be difficult for Democrats, President Biden’s party is divided over Washington’s attempt to end pandemic restrictions on the asylum application process»

«The turn against immigration distresses some Texas business owners»

«Correa has raised the regular price of his homes from $500,000 to about $650,000»

* * * * * * *


Shortage of immigrant labor raises prices in the US

About 10 miles (16 kilometers) from the Rio Grande, Mike Helle’s farm suffers from such a shortage of migrant workers that he has replaced 450 acres (180 hectares) of leafy greens, which are harvested by hand, with crops that can be harvest with machines.

In Houston, Al Flores raised prices at his restaurant because the cost of meat doubled due to a lack of immigrant staff on the production lines of the meatpacking plants. In the Dallas area, Joshua Correa raised the prices of homes built by his company by $150,000 due in part to cost increases caused by a lack of immigrant labor.

After immigration to the United States declined under President Donald Trump — and came to a near halt during the 18 months of the coronavirus pandemic — the country is finding that there is a labor shortage due in part to those brakes.

It is estimated that the country has two million fewer immigrants than it would have if the rate had been maintained. This has sparked a desperate dispute over labor in many sectors, including meatpacking and home construction, which also contributes to shortages and price increases.

“The lack of those two million immigrants partly explains why we have a labor shortage,” said Giovanni Peri, an economist at the University of California, Davis, who calculated the shortfall. “In the short term, we will adjust to that deficit in the labor market through increases in wages and prices.”

The labor factor is one of those that contribute to the United States suffering its highest inflation in the last 40 years; others are the disruptions in supply chains due to the coronavirus pandemic and the increase in fuel and raw material prices since the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Steve Camarota, a researcher at the Center for Immigration Studies, a supporter of reducing immigration, believes that during the presidency of Joe Biden there will be a sharp increase in unauthorized immigration that will offset the shortages that still persist after the pandemic. He further argues that wage increases in low-income sectors such as agriculture contribute little to inflation.

“I don’t think wage increases are a bad thing for the poor and I think it’s mathematically impossible to reduce inflation with limits on the lowest wages,” Camarota told The Associated Press.

Immigration is rapidly returning to its pre-pandemic levels, according to the researchers, but the United States would need a sharp acceleration to make up the shortfall. Given the sharp decline in birth rates over the past two decades, some economists forecast that the potential labor force will begin to shrink by 2025.

Meanwhile, the political system shows little will to increase immigration. The Democrats, who control the White House and Congress and have been the most pro-immigrant party in recent years, have not introduced important bills that would allow more new residents to enter the country. A recent Gallup poll reveals that fears of unauthorized immigration are the highest in two decades. With the November midterm elections looming, which will be difficult for Democrats, President Biden’s party is divided over Washington’s attempt to end pandemic restrictions on the asylum application process.

“At some point we either decided to get older and shrink or we changed our immigration policy,” said Douglas Holtz-Eakin, an economist and a former official in the administration of President George W. Bush who now chairs the center-right US Action Forum.

Holtz-Eakin acknowledged that a change in immigration policy is unlikely.

“The bases of both parties are very closed,” he said.

This is certainly the case in Republican-ruled Texas, which encompasses the longest and busiest stretch of the southern border.

In 2017, the legislature forced cities to have their federal immigration agents search for people living in the United States without legal authorization. Gov. Greg Abbott sent the Texas National Guard to patrol the border and recently caused massive traffic jams when he ordered increased inspections at border crossings.

The turn against immigration distresses some Texas business owners.

“Immigration is very important to our workforce in the United States,” Correa acknowledged. “We just need it.”

Correa is seeing his projects running two or three months behind schedule as he and his subcontractors — from drywall erectors to plumbers and electricians — struggle to put together work teams.

Correa has raised the regular price of his homes from $500,000 to about $650,000.

“We are feeling it and if at the end of the day we are feeling it as builders and developers, the consumer pays the price,” said Correa, who spoke from Pensacola, Florida, where he brought a crew of workers as a favor for a client who did not has been able to find employees to fix a beach house damaged by Hurricane Sally in 2020.

* * * * * * *


La carenza di manodopera immigrata fa aumentare i prezzi negli Stati Uniti

A circa 16 chilometri dal Rio Grande, la fattoria di Mike Helle soffre di una tale carenza di lavoratori immigrati che ha sostituito 450 acri (180 ettari) di verdure a foglia, che vengono raccolte a mano, con colture che possono essere raccolte con macchine.

A Houston, Al Flores ha aumentato i prezzi del suo ristorante perché il costo della carne è raddoppiato a causa della mancanza di personale immigrato sulle linee di produzione degli stabilimenti di confezionamento della carne. Nell’area di Dallas, Joshua Correa ha aumentato i prezzi delle case costruite dalla sua azienda di 150.000 dollari in parte a causa dell’aumento dei costi causato dalla mancanza di manodopera immigrata.

Dopo che l’immigrazione negli Stati Uniti è diminuita sotto il presidente Donald Trump – e si è quasi arrestata durante i 18 mesi della pandemia di coronavirus – il paese sta scoprendo che c’è una carenza di manodopera dovuta in parte a quei freni.

Si stima che il paese abbia due milioni di immigrati in meno di quanti ne avrebbe se il tasso fosse stato mantenuto. Questo ha scatenato una disperata disputa sulla manodopera in molti settori, tra cui l’imballaggio della carne e la costruzione di case, che contribuisce anche alla carenza e all’aumento dei prezzi.

“La mancanza di quei due milioni di immigrati spiega in parte perché abbiamo una carenza di manodopera”, ha detto Giovanni Peri, un economista dell’Università della California, Davis, che ha calcolato il deficit. “A breve termine, ci adegueremo a questo deficit nel mercato del lavoro attraverso aumenti dei salari e dei prezzi”.

Il fattore lavoro è uno di quelli che contribuiscono a far sì che gli Stati Uniti subiscano la più alta inflazione degli ultimi 40 anni; altri sono le interruzioni delle catene di approvvigionamento dovute alla pandemia di coronavirus e l’aumento dei prezzi del carburante e delle materie prime dopo l’invasione russa dell’Ucraina.

Steve Camarota, un ricercatore del Center for Immigration Studies, un sostenitore della riduzione dell’immigrazione, crede che durante la presidenza di Joe Biden ci sarà un forte aumento dell’immigrazione non autorizzata che compenserà le carenze che ancora persistono dopo la pandemia. Egli sostiene inoltre che gli aumenti salariali nei settori a basso reddito come l’agricoltura contribuiscono poco all’inflazione.

“Non penso che gli aumenti salariali siano una brutta cosa per i poveri e penso che sia matematicamente impossibile ridurre l’inflazione con limiti sui salari più bassi”, ha detto Camarota a The Associated Press.

L’immigrazione sta rapidamente tornando ai suoi livelli pre-pandemici, secondo i ricercatori, ma gli Stati Uniti avrebbero bisogno di una forte accelerazione per recuperare il deficit. Dato il forte calo delle nascite negli ultimi due decenni, alcuni economisti prevedono che la forza lavoro potenziale inizierà a ridursi entro il 2025.

Nel frattempo, il sistema politico mostra poca volontà di aumentare l’immigrazione. I democratici, che controllano la Casa Bianca e il Congresso e sono stati il partito più favorevole agli immigrati negli ultimi anni, non hanno introdotto importanti disegni di legge che permetterebbero a più nuovi residenti di entrare nel paese. Un recente sondaggio Gallup rivela che i timori dell’immigrazione non autorizzata sono i più alti degli ultimi due decenni. Con le elezioni di midterm di novembre incombenti, che saranno difficili per i democratici, il partito del presidente Biden è diviso sul tentativo di Washington di porre fine alle restrizioni pandemiche sul processo di richiesta di asilo.

“A un certo punto o abbiamo deciso di invecchiare e ridurci o abbiamo cambiato la nostra politica sull’immigrazione”, ha detto Douglas Holtz-Eakin, un economista ed ex funzionario dell’amministrazione del presidente George W. Bush che ora presiede il centro-destra US Action Forum.

Holtz-Eakin ha riconosciuto che un cambiamento nella politica d’immigrazione è improbabile.

“Le basi di entrambi i partiti sono molto chiuse”, ha detto.

Questo è certamente il caso del Texas governato dai repubblicani, che comprende il tratto più lungo e trafficato del confine meridionale.

Nel 2017, la legislatura ha costretto le città a far cercare ai loro agenti federali dell’immigrazione le persone che vivono negli Stati Uniti senza autorizzazione legale. Il governatore Greg Abbott ha inviato la Guardia Nazionale del Texas per pattugliare il confine e recentemente ha causato enormi ingorghi quando ha ordinato di aumentare le ispezioni ai valichi di frontiera.

La svolta contro l’immigrazione angoscia alcuni imprenditori del Texas.

“L’immigrazione è molto importante per la nostra forza lavoro negli Stati Uniti”, ha riconosciuto Correa. “Ne abbiamo bisogno”.

Correa vede i suoi progetti in ritardo di due o tre mesi sulla tabella di marcia, mentre lui e i suoi subappaltatori – dai muratori a secco agli idraulici ed elettricisti – lottano per mettere insieme le squadre di lavoro.

Correa ha aumentato il prezzo regolare delle sue case da 500.000 dollari a circa 650.000 dollari.

“Lo stiamo sentendo e se alla fine della giornata lo stiamo sentendo come costruttori e sviluppatori, il consumatore ne paga il prezzo”, ha detto Correa, che ha parlato da Pensacola, Florida, dove ha portato una squadra di lavoratori come favore per un cliente che non è stato in grado di trovare dipendenti per riparare una casa sulla spiaggia danneggiata dall’uragano Sally nel 2020.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Materie Prime, Russia, Unione Europea

Russia. Imposte sanzioni a molte realtà europee. Fornitura Gas ridotta.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-05-13.

Gufo_019__

«Cresce la crisi delle forniture di gas in Europa dopo le sanzioni della Russia».

«La Russia impone sanzioni alle filiali europee di Gazprom».

«Colpita anche l’azienda polacca che gestisce la sezione Yamal-Europa».

«La Germania perderà 10 milioni di metri cubi al giorno di forniture di gas».

«I prezzi del gas olandesi aumentano fino al 20%».

«La pressione sull’Europa per assicurarsi forniture alternative di gas è aumentata giovedì, quando Mosca ha imposto sanzioni alle filiali europee di Gazprom, un giorno dopo che l’Ucraina ha bloccato un’importante via di transito del gas, facendo salire i prezzi».

«La Russia ha imposto sanzioni nella tarda serata di mercoledì soprattutto alle filiali europee di Gazprom, tra cui Gazprom Germania, un’azienda di commercio, stoccaggio e trasmissione di energia che la Germania ha posto sotto amministrazione fiduciaria il mese scorso per garantire le forniture».

«Ha inoltre imposto sanzioni al proprietario della parte polacca del gasdotto Yamal-Europe, che trasporta il gas russo in Europa».

«Le entità colpite, elencate su un sito web del governo russo, hanno in gran parte sede in Paesi che hanno imposto sanzioni alla Russia».

«La Germania, primo cliente della Russia in Europa, ha dichiarato che alcune filiali di Gazprom Germania non ricevono gas a causa delle sanzioni».

«L’elenco comprende anche il più grande impianto di stoccaggio di gas della Germania a Rehden, nella Bassa Sassonia, con una capacità di 4 miliardi di metri cubi e gestito da Astora, nonché Wingas, un operatore che rifornisce l’industria e i servizi pubblici locali».

«Gazprom ha dichiarato che non sarà più in grado di esportare gas attraverso la Polonia tramite il gasdotto Yamal-Europe dopo le sanzioni contro EuRoPol Gaz, che possiede la sezione polacca».

«Il gasdotto collega i giacimenti di gas russi nella penisola di Yamal e nella Siberia occidentale con la Polonia e la Germania, attraverso la Bielorussia, e ha una capacità di 33 miliardi di metri cubi (bcm), circa un sesto delle esportazioni di gas russo in Europa».

«Le sanzioni di Mosca sono arrivate appena un giorno dopo che l’Ucraina ha bloccato una via di transito del gas, accusando l’interferenza delle forze russe di occupazione, la prima volta che le esportazioni attraverso l’Ucraina sono state interrotte dopo l’invasione».

«I politici finlandesi sono stati avvertiti che venerdì la Russia potrebbe interrompere le forniture di gas alla vicina Finlandia».

* * * * * * *


«Europe’s gas supply crisis grows after Russia imposes sanctions»

«Russia imposes sanctions on European Gazprom subsidiaries»

«Polish firm operating Yamal-Europe section also hit»

«Germany to lose 10 mcm/day of gas supply»

«Dutch gas prices rise by up to 20%»

«Pressure on Europe to secure alternative gas supplies increased on Thursday as Moscow imposed sanctions on European subsidiaries of state-owned Gazprom a day after Ukraine stopped a major gas transit route, pushing prices higher»

«Russia imposed sanctions late Wednesday mainly on Gazprom’s European subsidiaries including Gazprom Germania, an energy trading, storage and transmission business that Germany placed under trusteeship last month to secure supplies»

«It also placed sanctions on the owner of the Polish part of the Yamal-Europe pipeline that carries Russian gas to Europe»

«The affected entities, listed on a Russian government website, are largely based in countries that have imposed sanctions on Russia»

«Germany, Russia’s top client in Europe, said some subsidiaries of Gazprom Germania were receiving no gas because of the sanctions»

«The list also includes Germany’s biggest gas storage facility at Rehden in Lower Saxony, with 4 billion cubic metres of capacity and operated by Astora, as well as Wingas, a trader which supplies industry and local utilities»

«Gazprom said it would no longer be able to export gas through Poland via the Yamal-Europe pipeline after sanctions against EuRoPol Gaz, which owns the Polish section»

«The pipeline connects Russian gas fields in the Yamal Peninsula and Western Siberia with Poland and Germany, through Belarus, and has a 33 billion cubic metre (bcm) capacity, around a sixth of Russian gas exports to Europe»

«Moscow’s sanctions came just a day after Ukraine halted a gas transit route, blaming interference by occupying Russian forces, the first time exports via Ukraine have been disrupted since the invasion»

«Finnish politicians have been warned that Russia could halt gas supplies to neighbouring Finland on Friday»

* * * * * * *


Europe’s gas supply crisis grows after Russia imposes sanctions

– Russia imposes sanctions on European Gazprom subsidiaries

– Polish firm operating Yamal-Europe section also hit

– Germany to lose 10 mcm/day of gas supply

– Dutch gas prices rise by up to 20%

Berlin, May 12 (Reuters) – Pressure on Europe to secure alternative gas supplies increased on Thursday as Moscow imposed sanctions on European subsidiaries of state-owned Gazprom a day after Ukraine stopped a major gas transit route, pushing prices higher.

Russia imposed sanctions late Wednesday mainly on Gazprom’s European subsidiaries including Gazprom Germania, an energy trading, storage and transmission business that Germany placed under trusteeship last month to secure supplies.  

It also placed sanctions on the owner of the Polish part of the Yamal-Europe pipeline that carries Russian gas to Europe.

Kremlin spokesperson Dmitry Peskov said there can be no relations with the companies affected nor can they take part in supplying Russian gas.

The affected entities, listed on a Russian government website, are largely based in countries that have imposed sanctions on Russia in response to its invasion of Ukraine, most of them members of the European Union.

Germany, Russia’s top client in Europe, said some subsidiaries of Gazprom Germania were receiving no gas because of the sanctions, but are seeking alternatives.

“Gazprom and its subsidiaries are affected,” German Economy Minister Robert Habeck told the Bundestag lower house. “This means some of the subsidiaries are getting no more gas from Russia. But the market is offering alternatives.”

The list also includes Germany’s biggest gas storage facility at Rehden in Lower Saxony, with 4 billion cubic metres of capacity and operated by Astora, as well as Wingas, a trader which supplies industry and local utilities.

Wingas has said it would continue operating but would be exposed to shortages. Rivals Uniper, VNG or RWE could be potential sources of supply to the market. Russian gas flows to Germany continue via the Nord Stream 1 pipeline under the Baltic Sea.

If sanctioned firms cannot operate, other companies such as gas utilities could take over contracts, which would likely involve agreeing new terms with Gazprom, including for payment, said Henning Gloystein, director at Eurasia Group.

“This may be what Gazprom intends here, beyond also sending a retaliatory signal (for EU sanctions),” he added.

                         TRANSIT

Gazprom said it would no longer be able to export gas through Poland via the Yamal-Europe pipeline after sanctions against EuRoPol Gaz, which owns the Polish section.

The pipeline connects Russian gas fields in the Yamal Peninsula and Western Siberia with Poland and Germany, through Belarus, and has a 33 billion cubic metre (bcm) capacity, around a sixth of Russian gas exports to Europe.

However, gas has been flowing eastward through the pipeline from Germany to Poland for some weeks, enabling Poland – which was cut off from Russian supplies along with Bulgaria last month for refusing to comply with a new payment mechanism – to build stocks.

Exit flows into Poland at the Mallnow metering point on the German border stood at 9,734,151 kilowatt hours per hour (kWh/h) on Thursday, down from roughly 10,400,000 kWh/h the previous day, data from the Gascade pipeline operator showed.

Germany’s Habeck said Russia’s measures seemed designed to drive up prices but the expected 3% drop in Russian gas deliveries could be compensated for on the market, albeit at a higher cost.

Dutch gas prices at the TTF hub, the European benchmark, rose by up to 20% on Thursday but have skyrocketed over the past year, adding to the burden on households and businesses.

Although German gas storage is around 40% full, that is still low for the time of year and inventories need to be built up in preparation for winter.

                         WINTER

Moscow’s sanctions came just a day after Ukraine halted a gas transit route, blaming interference by occupying Russian forces, the first time exports via Ukraine have been disrupted since the invasion.  

The Sokhranovka gas transit point will not be re-opened until Kyiv obtains full control over its pipeline system, the head of operator GTSOU said, adding that flows could be re-directed to the alternative Sudzha transit point, although Gazprom has said this is not technologically possible.  

Ukraine’s gas transit system operator said Gazprom had booked capacity of 65.67 million cubic metres via the Sudzha entry point for Friday, versus 53.45 mcm for Thursday.

While the European Commission said the Ukrainian suspension does not present an immediate gas supply issue, there are concerns in the market about winter, when heating demand will rise and global supply constraints will bite.

“Storage levels are currently sufficient to last through most of 2022, even if Russian flows were to stop instantly, barring any unexpected weather events – but the outlook for winter 2022 supply is now a lot more pessimistic,” said Kaushal Ramesh, senior analyst at consultancy Rystad Energy.

Finnish politicians have been warned that Russia could halt gas supplies to neighbouring Finland on Friday, newspaper Iltalehti reported, citing unnamed sources.

There is also still confusion still among EU gas companies over a payment scheme decreed by Moscow in March which the European Commission has said would breach EU sanctions.

Germany’s top power producer, RWE, expects Berlin to soon clarify whether payments for Russian gas can be made under Moscow’s proposed scheme, its finance chief said on Thursday, as a deadline approaches at the end of the month.

Russia’s demand for payment in roubles has been rejected by most European gas buyers over the details of the process, which requires opening accounts with Gazprombank, fuelling fears about potential supply disruptions and their far-reaching consequences for Europe and particularly Germany, which relies heavily on Russian gas.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Materie Prime

Petrolio. Prezzi del greggio e del raffinato. Per questi 275 Usd a barile.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-05-13.

Michelangelo__Giudizio_Universale__ Minosse 002_

«Spiacente, ma per te il petrolio viene scambiato a 250 dollari al barile»

“Se sei il proprietario di una raffineria di petrolio, allora il greggio viene scambiato felicemente poco sopra i 110 dollari al barile»

«Se non sei un barone del petrolio, ho brutte notizie: è come se il petrolio fosse scambiato da qualche parte tra 150 e 275 dollari al barile»

«In primo luogo, la domanda – in particolare per il diesel – è rimbalzata fortemente, esaurendo le scorte globali»

«In secondo luogo, gli Stati Uniti e i loro alleati hanno attinto alle loro riserve strategiche di petrolio per bloccare il rally del prezzo del petrolio»

«Terzo, e forse il più importante, la capacità di raffinazione è diminuita dove è importante per il mercato ora».

«Quarto, le sanzioni e gli embarghi unilaterali – noti anche come auto-sanzioni – sul petrolio russo».

* * * * * * *

«Sorry, but for you, oil trades at $250 a barrel»

«If you are the owner of an oil refinery, then crude is trading happily just a little above $110 a barrel»

«If you aren’t an oil baron, I have bad news: it’s as if oil is trading somewhere between $150 and $275 a barrel»

«Instead, the real economy is suffering a much stronger price shock than it appears, because fuel prices are rising much faster than crude, and that matters for monetary policy»

«Wall Street closely monitors the price of crude, particularly a grade called West Texas Intermediate traded in New York»

«But only oil refiners buy crude»

«The rest of us — the real economy — purchase refined petroleum products like gasoline, diesel and jet-fuel that we can use to run cars, trucks and airplanes»

«It’s those post-refinery prices that matter to us»

«Take jet-fuel: in New York harbor, a key hub, it’s changing hands at the equivalent to $275 per barrel»

«Diesel isn’t far away, at about $175 a barrel. And gasoline is at about $155 a barrel»

«Refining margins have exploded. And that means energy inflation is far stronger than it appears»

«for every three barrels of WTI crude oil the refinery processes, it makes two barrels of gasoline and one barrel of distillate fuel like diesel and jet-fuel»

«There are four main reasons behind the explosion in refining margins»

«First, demand — particularly for diesel —  has rebounded strongly, depleting global inventories»

«Second, the U.S. and its allies have tapped their strategic petroleum reserves to cap the rally in oil price»

«Third, and perhaps most importantly, refining capacity has declined where it matters for the market now, and the plants that are operating are struggling to process enough crude to satisfy the demand for fuel»

«Fourth, are the sanctions and unilateral embargos — also known as self-sanctions — on Russian oil. Before the invasion of Ukraine, Russia was a major exporter not just of crude, but also of diesel and semi-processed oil that Western refiners turned into fuel»

«Europe not only needs to find extra crude to produce the diesel and other fuels it’s not buying from Russia, but, crucially, it needs the refining capacity to do so, too. It’s a double blow»

«Oil traders estimate that Russia has shut down 1.3 million to 1.5 million barrels a day of refining capacity as result of the self-sanctions»

«The only solution is to lower demand. For that, however, a recession will be necessary»

* * * * * * * *


Sorry, But for You, Oil Trades at $250 a Barrel.

If you are the owner of an oil refinery, then crude is trading happily just a little above $110 a barrel — expensive, but not extortionate. If you aren’t an oil baron, I have bad news: it’s as if oil is trading somewhere between $150 and $275 a barrel.

The oil market is projecting a false sense of stability when it comes to energy inflation. Instead, the real economy is suffering a much stronger price shock than it appears, because fuel prices are rising much faster than crude, and that matters for monetary policy.

To understand why, let’s examine the guts of the oil market: the refining industry. 

Wall Street closely monitors the price of crude, particularly a grade called West Texas Intermediate traded in New York. It’s a benchmark followed by everyone, from bond investors to central bankers. But only oil refiners buy crude — and therefore, are exposed to its price. The rest of us — the real economy — purchase refined petroleum products like gasoline, diesel and jet-fuel that we can use to run cars, trucks and airplanes. It’s those post-refinery prices that matter to us. 

Typically, the price of crude and the price of refined products go up and down in tandem, almost symmetrically. What’s in between is a refining margin. In normal times, WTI is a handy price shorthand for the entirety of the petroleum market. So when, say, U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell looks at WTI, he gets a neat picture of the whole energy market. 

But we aren’t in normal times. Right now, the traditional relationship between crude and refined products is broken. WTI is anchored around $100-$110 a barrel, suggesting that — in barrel terms — gasoline, diesel and jet-fuel prices shouldn’t be much higher, once you add the average refining margin. 

In reality, they are a lot more expensive. Take jet-fuel: in New York harbor, a key hub, it’s changing hands at the equivalent to $275 per barrel. Diesel isn’t far away, at about $175 a barrel. And gasoline is at about $155 a barrel. Those are wholesale prices, before you add taxes and marketing margins.

What’s changed? Refining margins have exploded. And that means energy inflation is far stronger than it appears. 

Oil refineries are complex machines, capable of processing multiple streams of crude into dozens of different petroleum products. For simplicity’s sake, the industry measures refining margins using a rough calculation called the “3-2-1 crack spread”: for every three barrels of WTI crude oil the refinery processes, it makes two barrels of gasoline and one barrel of distillate fuel like diesel and jet-fuel. 

From 1985 to 2021, the crack spread averaged about $10.50 a barrel. Even between 2004 and 2008, during the so-called golden age of refining, the crack spread never surpassed $30. It rarely spent more than a few weeks above $20. Last week, however, the margin jumped to a record high of nearly $55. Crack margins for diesel and other petroleum products surged much higher. 

There are four main reasons behind the explosion in refining margins. 

First, demand — particularly for diesel —  has rebounded strongly, depleting global inventories. In some markets, like the U.S. East Coast, diesel stocks have fallen to a 30-year low. Despite rising prices and fears of an economic slowdown later this year, oil executive say they see strong consumption for now. “Demand is not that easily destroyed,” Shell Plc Chief Executive Officer Ben van Beurden told investors last week.

Second, the U.S. and its allies have tapped their strategic petroleum reserves to cap the rally in oil prices. That has provided extra crude, which has put a lid on WTI prices, but it hasn’t addressed the tightness in refined products. Only a small fraction of the emergency release is in the form of refined products, and only in Europe. 

Third, and perhaps most importantly, refining capacity has declined where it matters for the market now, and the plants that are operating are struggling to process enough crude to satisfy the demand for fuel. Martijn Rats, an oil analyst at Morgan Stanley, estimates that outside China and the Middle East, oil distillation capacity fell by 1.9 million barrels a day from the end of 2019 to today — that’s the largest decline in 30 years.

The downward trend started well before the pandemic hit, as old Western refineries struggled to compete, environmental regulations increased costs and the unfounded fear of peak oil demand amid the energy transition prompted some companies to close plants. The fuel-demand collapse triggered by Covid-19 only turbo-charged the trend, resulting in dozens of refinery operations shutting down for good in Europe and the U.S. in 2020 and 2021. New capacity has emerged in China. However, Beijing tightly controls how much fuel its refiners can export so that capacity is effectively out of reach of the global market. 

“Has the oil market hit the refinery wall?,” Rats asked in a note to clients last week. “Unusually, the answer appears to be yes.”

Fourth, are the sanctions and unilateral embargos — also known as self-sanctions — on Russian oil. Before the invasion of Ukraine, Russia was a major exporter not just of crude, but also of diesel and semi-processed oil that Western refiners turned into fuel. Europe, in particular, relied on Russian refineries for a significant chunk of its diesel imports. The flow has now dried.

Europe not only needs to find extra crude to produce the diesel and other fuels it’s not buying from Russia, but, crucially, it needs the refining capacity to do so, too. It’s a double blow. Oil traders estimate that Russia has shut down 1.3 million to 1.5 million barrels a day of refining capacity as result of the self-sanctions. 

Who’s benefiting? The pure-play oil refiners, which are quietly enjoying record-high profit margins. While OPEC and Big Oil get the blame, independent refiners are cashing-in. The sky-high crack margins explains why the share prices of U.S. refining giants Marathon Petroleum Corp. and Valero Energy Corp. have surged to all-time highs. The longer the refiners make super-profits, the harder the energy shock will hit the economy. The only solution is to lower demand. For that, however, a recession will be necessary. 

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Javier Blas is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering energy and commodities. A former reporter for Bloomberg News and commodities editor at the Financial Times, he is coauthor of “The World for Sale: Money, Power and the Traders Who Barter the Earth’s Resources.”

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo

Italia. Lavoratori Autonomi scesi a 4,977 mila dal 2020, -4.1% dal 2020.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-05-12.

Gufi 001

                         In sintesi.

«Due anni fa erano 5 milioni 192 mila, al termine del primo trimestre di quest’anno sono scesi a 4 milioni 977 mila (-4.1 per cento)»

«dal febbraio del 2020, mese che precede l’avvento della pandemia, al marzo di quest’anno, ultima rilevazione effettuata dall’Istat, i lavoratori indipendenti sono diminuiti di 215 mila unità»

«Se 2 anni fa erano 5 milioni 192 mila, al termine del primo trimestre di quest’anno sono scesi a 4 milioni 977 mila (-4.1 per cento)»

«Sempre nello stesso intervallo di tempo, invece, i lavoratori dipendenti sono aumentati di 233 mila unità, passando da 17 milioni 830 mila a 18 milioni 63 mila (+1,3 per cento)»

«Gli artigiani, i piccoli commercianti, le partite Iva, tanti giovani liberi professionisti, a fronte dei ripetuti lockdown e della conseguente caduta dei consumi interni – fa notare l’uffico studi Cgia – sono stati costretti a gettare definitivamente la spugna»

«Ma ora l’aumento esponenziale dei prezzi, il caro carburante e quello delle bollette potrebbero peggiorare notevolmente la situazione economica di tantissime famiglie»

«Il 70 per cento circa degli artigiani e dei commercianti lavora da solo»

«Se a febbraio di quest’anno i lavoratori indipendenti presenti in Italia erano tornati sopra la soglia dei 5 milioni (precisamente 5,018,00), alla fine di marzo sono scesi a 4 milioni 977 mila unità (- 41 mila)»

«la sensazione è che il Covid abbia contribuito ad incrementare sensibilmente il numero degli irregolari»

* * * * * * *


La lenta agonia degli autonomi: sono 215 mila in meno da pre-Covid

Due anni fa erano 5 milioni 192 mila, al termine del primo trimestre di quest’anno sono scesi a 4 milioni 977 mila (-4,1 per cento).

AGI – Il mondo del lavoro autonomo sta vivendo “una lenta agonia”. Lo afferma l’Ufficio studi della Cgia, secondo cui gli effetti economici provocati dal Covid sono stati pesantissimi: dal febbraio del 2020, mese che precede l’avvento della pandemia, al marzo di quest’anno, ultima rilevazione effettuata dall’Istat, i lavoratori indipendenti sono diminuiti di 215 mila unità.

Se 2 anni fa erano 5 milioni 192 mila, al termine del primo trimestre di quest’anno sono scesi a 4 milioni 977 mila (-4,1 per cento). Sempre nello stesso intervallo di tempo, invece, i lavoratori dipendenti sono aumentati di 233 mila unità, passando da 17 milioni 830 mila a 18 milioni 63 mila (+1,3 per cento), anche se Cgia sottolinea che la quasi totalità dell’incremento è riconducibile a persone che in questo biennio sono state assunte con un contratto a termine.

Gli artigiani, i piccoli commercianti, le partite Iva, tanti giovani liberi professionisti, a fronte dei ripetuti lockdown e della conseguente caduta dei consumi interni – fa notare l’ufficio studi Cgia – sono stati costretti “a gettare definitivamente la spugna. Tuttavia, visto che il numero dei lavoratori dipendenti in questi ultimi 2 anni è cresciuto, non è da escludere che fra coloro che hanno chiuso la propria attività, alcuni siano rientrati nel mercato del lavoro, facendosi assumere come dipendenti”.

Ma ora l’aumento esponenziale dei prezzi, il caro carburante e quello delle bollette potrebbero peggiorare notevolmente la situazione economica di tantissime famiglie, soprattutto quelle composte da autonomi. Il 70 per cento circa degli artigiani e dei commercianti lavora da solo, ovvero non ha né dipendenti né collaboratori familiari: moltissimi artigiani, piccoli commercianti e partite Iva – sottolinea Cgia – stanno pagando due volte lo straordinario aumento registrato in questi ultimi 6 mesi dalle bollette di luce e gas: come utenti domestici e come piccoli imprenditori.

E nonostante le misure di  mitigazione introdotte in questi ultimi mesi dal governo Draghi, i costi energetici sono esplosi, raggiungendo livelli mai visti nel recente passato.     

Secondo Cgia, “senza aspettare Bruxelles, bisogna che il nostro Governo intervenga subito, introducendo a livello nazionale un tetto temporaneo al prezzo del gas, così come hanno già fatto la Spagna (nell’autunno scorso) e la Francia (a inizio di quest’anno).

Secondo Cgia, anche l’avvento della guerra in Ucraina sembra abbia peggiorato ulteriormente la situazione. Se a febbraio di quest’anno i lavoratori indipendenti presenti in Italia erano tornati sopra la soglia dei 5 milioni (precisamente 5.018.000), alla fine di marzo sono scesi a 4 milioni 977 mila unità (- 41 mila).

La Cgia lancia poi l’allarme sul sommerso: molti di coloro che hanno chiuso definitivamente l’attività e non sono riusciti a trovare una nuova occupazione, probabilmente continuano a lavorare in “nero”. Dati ufficiali ancora non ce ne sono, ma la sensazione è che il Covid abbia contribuito ad incrementare sensibilmente il numero degli irregolari, vale a dire di coloro che prestano la propria attività abusivamente. 

Lo studio evidenzia poi che le città stanno cambiando volto: con meno negozi e uffici sono meno frequentate, più insicure e con livelli di degrado in aumento. “La moria di attività sta colpendo anche coloro che storicamente sono sempre stati in concorrenza con i negozi di vicinato; ovvero i centri commerciali. Anche la Grande Distribuzione Organizzata (GDO) è in grosse difficoltà e non sono poche le aree commerciali al chiuso che presentano intere sezioni dell’immobile precluse al pubblico, perché le attività presenti precedentemente hanno abbassato definitivamente le saracinesche”