Pubblicato in: Commercio, Devoluzione socialismo, Economia e Produzione Industriale, Materie Prime

Toilet Paper. Aumenti dei prezzi delle materie prime ma soprattutto quelli del trasporto.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2023-01-29.

2022-07-24__ Carta Igienica 001

«Figures from NeilsenIQ say toilet paper prices rose by 15.6% in the year to May»

«The price per tonne jumped from just over $600 in September to more than $900 last month – so a 50% increase in a very short space of time»

«Costco’s Kirkland brand two-ply toilet tissue in the 30-roll package contains a total of 1,425 sq. ft. of product for $21.99, or 1.5 cents per sq. ft. ($21.99 ÷ 1425 = $0.015).

Right next to that brand is the Charmin 30-roll package of  2-ply containing 805 sq. ft. of paper, for $31.49, or 4 cents per sq. ft. ($31.49 ÷ 805 = $0.039).»

La carta igienica non è infatti comprimibile. Occupa di conseguenza grandi volumi e satura con poche confezioni all’ingrosso il vano di carico dei Tir. Ma con i costi sempre più alti dei carburanti i prezzi di vendita al dettaglio si ingigantiscono. Al momento, oltre il sessanta per cento del costo è costituito dagli oneri del trasporto ai dettaglianti.

* * * * * * *

«Toilet paper (sometimes called toilet tissue or bathroom tissue) is a tissue paper product primarily used to clean the anus and surrounding anal region of feces after defecation, and to clean the perineal area and external genitalia of urine after urination or other bodily fluid releases. It also acts as a layer of protection for the hands during these processes. It is usually supplied as a long strip of perforated paper wrapped around a paperboard core for storage in a dispenser near a toilet. The bundle is known as a toilet roll, or loo roll or bog roll in Britain. ….

Joseph Gayetty is widely credited with being the inventor of modern commercially available toilet paper in the United States. Gayetty’s paper, first introduced in 1857. ….

Toilet paper is usually manufactured from pulpwood trees, but is also sometimes made from sugar cane byproducts or bamboo.

Toilet paper products vary greatly in the distinguishing technical factors, such as size, weight, roughness, softness, chemical residues, “finger-breakthrough” resistance, water-absorption, etc. The larger companies have very detailed, scientific market surveys to determine which marketing sectors require or demand which of the many technical qualities. Modern toilet paper may have a light coating of aloe or lotion or wax worked into the paper to reduce roughness….

The company called Cloud Paper has developed an alternative to tree-based toilet paper that is made out of bamboo» [Fonte]

* * * * * * *

Il mercato della carta igienica è stato valutato a ~25,5 miliardi di dollari nel 2020. Si prevede che il mercato crescerà a un CAGR del~5% nel periodo di previsione 2021-2027.

Nella maggior parte dei Paesi sviluppati, la carta igienica è diventata una necessità per l’igiene del bagno. Si tratta di un prodotto multiuso che viene utilizzato soprattutto per assicurarsi che il trucco e le fuoriuscite vengano puliti correttamente in bagno.

Il consumo di prodotti per l’igiene personale è cresciuto notevolmente sia nei Paesi sviluppati che in quelli in via di sviluppo, grazie alla crescente consapevolezza dell’igiene.

Nel mercato della carta igienica, i fornitori di materie prime svolgono un ruolo importante. L’aumento dei costi delle materie prime ostacola la crescita del mercato a causa dell’aumento dei prezzi delle materie prime.

Se però gli aumenti dei prezzi delle materie prime incidono pesantemente sul prezzo finale al consumo, il vero onere è costituito dai costi di trasporto.

La carta igienica non è infatti comprimibile. Occupa di conseguenza grandi volumi e satura con poche confezioni all’ingrosso il vano di carico dei Tir. Ma con i costi sempre più alti dei carburanti i prezzi di vendita al dettaglio si ingigantiscono.

* * * * * * *

«The toilet paper market size was valued at ~$25.5 billion in 2020. The market is forecast to grow at a CAGR of~5% during the forecast period from 2021-2027»

«In a majority of the developed countries, toilet paper has become a necessity for bathroom hygiene. It is a multipurpose product that is mostly used for making sure that makeup and spills are cleaned up properly in a toilet»

«The consumption of personal hygiene products has grown substantially in developed and developing countries, owing to increasing awareness of hygiene»

«In the toilet paper market, raw material suppliers play a significant role. Raw material cost increases hinder the market’s growth as raw materials prices rise»

* * * * * * *


Toilet Paper Market 2022 is Expected to be Considerable Growth Achieve Until 2030

The toilet paper market size was valued at ~$25.5 billion in 2020. The market is forecast to grow at a CAGR of~5% during the forecast period from 2021-2027.

New York , United States – The toilet paper market size was valued at ~$25.5 billion in 2020. The market is forecast to grow at a CAGR of~5% during the forecast period from 2021-2027.

This type of tissue paper is called a toilet roll, and it is considered to be an essential item given that there are so many kinds of tissue paper. In a majority of the developed countries, toilet paper has become a necessity for bathroom hygiene. It is a multipurpose product that is mostly used for making sure that makeup and spills are cleaned up properly in a toilet.

It is common for people of all ages, including the elderly, children, and people with chronic illnesses, to use a variety of household products including toilet care to keep the household and people in good health. Several diseases and conditions are caused as a result of the increased amount of germs, dirt, micro-organisms, and others on the surface of everything. Therefore, the invention of new products, as well as the development of new technologies, have led to the development of new methods for maintaining home hygiene

                         Factors Affecting the Global Toilet Paper Market

Cleaners and disinfectants formulated specifically for toilets have enabled the use of a multitude of useful products for the use of home care. Over the forecast period, these factors are expected to boost the market growth.

The consumption of personal hygiene products has grown substantially in developed and developing countries, owing to increasing awareness of hygiene. As disposable income and the standard of living in developing countries have steadily increased, there has been an increased demand for top-quality sanitary ware products in terms of convenience.

In the toilet paper market, raw material suppliers play a significant role. Raw material cost increases hinder the market’s growth as raw materials prices rise. Moreover, due to the stringent controls on the production and import of raw materials, such as wood, there is a scarcity of high-quality wood on the market, and, consequently toilet paper products are becoming more difficult to develop.

                         Covid-19 Impact on the Global Toilet Paper Market

Sales and demand for toilet paper have been positively affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. The initial stage of the lockdown was characterized by an increase in toilet paper demands. A lockdown on toilet paper was a major cause for panic buying among customers in developed countries.

                         Regional Outlook: the Global Toilet Paper Market

North America holds a maximum share of the tissue paper market as American consumers are among the top users of tissue papers in terms of volume used over the rest of the world. Since toilet paper is already the most competitive category on the market, it has an already high household penetration rate of close to 100%. As a result, consumers have been increasingly driving their purchases to the premium end of the market.

The Away-from-Home segment of the market becomes more and more dominant in this region with sales dominating the market. Despite this, tissue manufacturers are being pressured to use more virgin fiber due to dwindling availability and deteriorating quality of recovered fiber.

To keep costs low and maximize the long-term growth potential of the region, pulp and paper manufacturers are integrating their operations with pulp companies. Although this can adversely affect the tissue market, pulp capacity can be affected by such integrations. A number of other limitations are also putting pressure on the growth of the tissue market, including fierce competition, volume maturity, and price pressure.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Commercio, Devoluzione socialismo

Germania. Volume delle transazioni immobiliari. Meno 74% rispetto al 2021.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2023-01-11.

Germany 001

 

                          Il mercato immobiliare tedesco ha subito un duro colpo nel quarto trimestre, in quanto gli investitori hanno rinunciato alle operazioni a causa dell’aumento dei costi di finanziamento. Gli investimenti totali nel settore immobiliare commerciale del Paese hanno raggiunto solo 9.9 miliardi di euro (10.6 miliardi di dollari) negli ultimi tre mesi del 2022, con un calo del 50% rispetto alla media quinquennale del periodo, secondo un rapporto pubblicato lunedì dall’unità immobiliare di BNP Paribas. L’andamento è in gran parte dovuto all’impennata dei tassi di interesse, all’indebolimento dell’economia e all’inflazione record.

                         L’aumento dei costi di finanziamento ha creato un cuneo tra le aspettative di prezzo di acquirenti e venditori. Una dinamica simile si sta verificando nel mercato degli immobili residenziali, dove il volume delle transazioni per l’intero anno è crollato del 74% rispetto al 2021. Le imprese immobiliari europee sono alle prese con un crollo delle valutazioni e delle transazioni dopo che la Banca Centrale Europea e altri responsabili della politica monetaria hanno aumentato rapidamente i tassi di interesse nel 2022, arrestando il boom dei prezzi degli asset.

* * * * * * *

«Germany’s real estate market took a deep hit in the fourth quarter as investors shied away from deals on the back of soaring financing costs. Total investments in the country’s commercial property sector only reached €9.9 billion ($10.6 billion) in the last three months of 2022, a decline of 50% compared with the five-year average for the period, according to a report released by BNP Paribas’ real estate unit on Monday. The development is largely due to soaring interest rates, a weakening economy and record inflation, it said.»

«Rising financing costs drove a wedge between pricing expectations of buyers and sellers. A similar dynamic is taking place in the market for residential real estate where the deal volume for the full year collapsed by 74% compared with 2021. Europe’s real estate firms are grappling with a plunge in valuations and dealmaking after the European Central Bank and other monetary policy makers rapidly increased interest rates in 2022, bringing to a halt a boom in asset prices»

* * * * * * *


German Real Estate Deals Plunged 50% in Fourth Quarter, BNP Says.

(Bloomberg) — Germany’s real estate market took a deep hit in the fourth quarter as investors shied away from deals on the back of soaring financing costs.

Total investments in the country’s commercial property sector only reached €9.9 billion ($10.6 billion) in the last three months of 2022, a decline of 50% compared with the five-year average for the period, according to a report released by BNP Paribas’ real estate unit on Monday. The development is largely due to soaring interest rates, a weakening economy and record inflation, it said.

The worsening environment meant “that many large transactions that already were at marketing stage did not take place” as rising financing costs drove a wedge between pricing expectations of buyers and sellers, Marcus Zorn, chief executive officer of BNP Paribas Real Estate Germany, said in the release. The trend would likely continue during the first half of 2023 but would reverse in the second half, he said.

A similar dynamic is taking place in the market for residential real estate where the deal volume for the full year collapsed by 74% compared with 2021, BNP said in a separate press release.

Europe’s real estate firms are grappling with a plunge in valuations and dealmaking after the European Central Bank and other monetary policy makers rapidly increased interest rates in 2022, bringing to a halt a boom in asset prices that had lasted for more than a decade.

Pubblicato in: Commercio, Devoluzione socialismo, Finanza e Sistema Bancario

Tetto del contante a 5 mila euro ed altro dal 2023.

Dott. Gabriele Righetti

2023-01-08.

Considerazioni preliminari

L’uso del denaro contante non è solo uno strumento di pagamento, di scambio, di circolazione della ricchezza, ma anche uno strumento di riservatezza nella conduzione del proprio operare.

Al netto dei conflitti di interesse di chi propugna la sua utilizzazione, od addirittura la sua eliminazione (comparto commissionale e/o vendita di dati?), il denaro contante è strumento non costoso per il sistema economico ed è la stessa Banca Centrale Europea, attraverso un post di poco tempo fa a firma del membro del suo Comitato esecutivo Fabio Panetta (post pubblicato QUI e riportato in seguito), che ne evidenzia la fondamentale importanza1, funzione2, convenienza3, ove fra l’altro vi si afferma che le banconote e monete non verrebbero eliminate neppure con l’emissione dell’euro digitale, attualmente allo studio.

Del resto, per via del paradigma di sovranità nel battere moneta legale (moneta “fiat”) non sarebbe neppure possibile, oltre che opportuno, eliminare il denaro contante e la sua criminalizzazione è effettuata da coloro che inconfessabilmente portano dei conflitti di interesse o non sono adeguatamente informati, compreso quello di attribuire prevalentemente all’uso del contante l’ammanco del gettito fiscale per via dell’evasione che questa modalità consentirebbe.

Premessa

La legge di Bilancio del 2023 (Legge 29/12/2022 n. 197, il cui testo è scaricabile dal sito dello studio a questo link: https://www.righettiassociati.it/wp-content/uploads/2022/12/Legge-di-Bilancio-2023-L-29-12-2022-N-197.pdf), tra i suoi 21 articoli di totali 1.017 commi, tratta -con novità e conferme- la regolamentazione di alcuni strumenti di pagamento.

Denaro contante: elevazione a 4.999,99 euro del tetto di libero utilizzo

Dopo un grande dibattito con ingerenze anche a livello di Commissione europea4, dal primo gennaio 2023 è stata elevata a 5.000 euro la soglia da cui scattano sanzioni se i pagamenti tra persone fisiche e/o persone giuridiche (società, enti, ecc.) vengono effettuati con denaro contante.

Al comma 3-bis dell’art. 49 del D.Lgs. n. 231/2007 è stato inserito:

“A decorrere dal 1° gennaio 2023, il predetto divieto di cui al comma 1 è riferito alla cifra di 5.000 euro.”5

Sarà così possibile, dall’inizio del nuovo anno, effettuare trasferimenti di denaro contante fino a 4.999,99 euro senza incorrere in sanzioni.

I soggetti (debitore e creditore) coinvolti in operazioni di pagamento o comunque di trasferimento di denaro contante ultrasoglia rischiano la sanzione minima di mille euro e massima di 50 mila euro.

Anche se la norma afferma che sono “vietati” i pagamenti ultrasoglia con denaro contante6, occorre ricordare che -aldilà delle conseguenze sanzionatorie prodotte dalla normativa antiriciclaggio-, ai fini del codice civile -regolatore dei rapporti tra le persone e lo stato-  tali pagamenti sono perfettamente validi.

Trovano conferma tutta la precedente vigente regolamentazione, compresi:

  • la sanzionabilità dei pagamenti artatamente frazionati,
  • i rischi di accertamento fiscale per versamenti (in generale) anche all’interno del tetto al contante se “ingiustificabili” da un punto di vista reddituale.

Occorre ricordare che i prelevamenti bancari -di per sè- non sono sanzionabili, ancorchè le banche affermino il contrario.

Per quanto sopra ed altro un approfondimento può farsi riferimento a questo post.

POS

Pari se non maggiore dibattito rispetto al tetto del contante l’ha ricevuto la norma di liberazione dall’obbligo di accettazione di pagamenti di importo pari o inferiore a 60 euro che l’acquirente avrebbe voluto effettuare tramite carte di debito o di credito.

La trasformazione in facoltà, anzichè obbligo, di pagamento tramite POS per pagamenti inferiori a  60 euro non è stata apportata.

Conseguentemente sarà applicabile anche nell’anno 2023, l’Art. 15, comma 4-bis del D.L. n. 179/2012, il quale prevede(va) che, con decorrenza dal 30 giugno 2022 nei casi di mancata accettazione di un pagamento, indipendentemente dall’importo, effettuato con carta di debito, carta di credito o carta prepagata, da parte di un professionista o da un esercente attività commerciale, si applica nei confronti di tale soggetto la sanzione amministrativa pari a 30 euro, aumentata del 4 per cento del valore della transazione.

Cambiavalute

Col 1° gennaio 2023 viene modificato anche il limite previsto per le operazioni effettuate dai cambiavalute iscritti nell’apposito registro.

Dal 1° gennaio 2023 si applicherà il limite di base pari a 3.000 euro (Art. 49, comma 3-bis, D.Lgs. 231/2007), in luogo della preceedente soglia di 2.000 euro (in vigore fino al 31 dicembre 2022).

Money transfer

Non subirà alcuna modifica, neppure nel nuovo anno, il limite di 999,99 euro all’utilizzo di contanti per il servizio di rimessa di denaro, più comunemente noto come money transfer, autentico buco nero della normativa valutaria ed antiriciclaggio.

Note:

[1] “Fin dai tempi dell’antica Grecia il termine moneta è stato sinonimo di contante: dapprima le monete e poi le banconote hanno infatti rappresentato mezzi di pagamento efficienti e ampiamente accettati nella vita di tutti i giorni.”

[2] Il contante e gli strumenti digitali rappresentano sistemi di pagamento tra loro complementari: la possibilità di utilizzare entrambe queste modalità garantisce ai consumatori di tutte fasce economiche e sociali un’abbondante scelta e un ampio accesso a mezzi di pagamento facili da utilizzare, assicurando un grado elevato di inclusione e di affidabilità nel campo dei pagamenti.

Anche se concepiti per garantire la massima affidabilità, i pagamenti digitali sono inevitabilmente espositi a rischi di blackout, di attacchi cibernetici e di malfunzionamenti tecnici. L’utilizzo del contante non risente invece di questi rischi. Esso conferisce pertanto resilienza al sistema dei pagamenti: per sua natura, rappresenta infatti uno strumento utilizzabile in condizioni estreme, oltre che una sicura riserva di valore: la nostra indagine SPACE sui pagamenti indica che il 34% dei cittadini dell’area dell’euro detiene contante a fini precauzionali.

Il contante è inoltre utilizzabile da chiunque; al contrario gli strumenti di pagamento digitali potrebbero escludere dal circuito economico i consumatori che non vogliono utilizzarli, ad esempio per ragioni di privacy, o che non sono grado di farlo.
… il contante è usato con regolarità da cittadini di ogni età, livello di istruzione e fascia di reddito. Esso è quindi essenziale per l’inclusione finanziaria delle fasce di cittadini più vulnerabili – ad esempio, quelle prive di un conto bancario o di competenze digitali. Queste indicazioni sottolineano l’importanza di garantire il regolare funzionamento del “ciclo del contante”, assicurando sia un ampio accesso alle banconote sia una ampia accettazione dei pagamenti in contanti nei punti di vendita. L’Eurosistema è pienamente impegnato su questi due fronti”
.

[3] “L’euro digitale affiancherebbe il contante, senza sostituirlo: insieme, questi due strumenti garantirebbero un’adeguata disponibilità di strumenti di pagamento di facile utilizzo ed esenti da costi.”

[4] entrata a gamba tesa sull’eccessività del tetto al contante a Se il . euro, laddove numerosi paesi (Germania in primis) non hanno alcun tetto.

[5] Se il legislatore non fosse intervenuto, il limite sarebbe sceso da 2.000 a 1.000 euro.

[6] e di titoli al portatore in euro o in valuta estera, effettuato a qualsiasi titolo tra soggetti diversi, siano esse persone fisiche o giuridiche.

Pubblicato in: Commercio, India, Logistica, Regno Unito

India. Lancia altri 36 satelliti di comunicazioni per OneWeb.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-10-27.

India 013

                         La società satellitare londinese OneWeb è tornata in pista con il lancio di altre 36 navicelle per il suo sistema globale di Internet a banda larga. Le piattaforme sono salite su un razzo GSLV dall’isola di Sriharikota, in India. Gli sforzi di OneWeb per distribuire la sua rete di telecomunicazioni sono stati sospesi da marzo, quando è stato costretto a sospendere l’uso dei razzi russi Soyuz. Il volo di domenica porta a 462 il numero di satelliti in orbita sopra la Terra.

                         L’azienda, in parte di proprietà del governo britannico, prevede di completare l’installazione a metà del prossimo anno.

Il Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV), il razzo più grande e più capace dell’India, si è sollevato dallo spazioporto Satish Dhawan, nello Stato dell’Andhra Pradesh.

                          Ci vorranno alcune settimane prima che i motori a ioni dei veicoli spaziali li portino nelle loro orbite polari operative, a 1,200 km di altezza. OneWeb offre già connessioni a banda larga ad alta velocità ai clienti beta al di sopra dei 50 gradi nord e sud. Quest’ultimo lancio e un altro entro la fine dell’anno avvicineranno la copertura all’equatore.

* * * * * * *

«The London-based satellite company, OneWeb, is back on track with the launch of another 36 spacecraft for its global broadband internet system. The platforms went up on a GSLV rocket from Sriharikota island in India. OneWeb’s efforts to deploy its telecommunications network had been on hold since March when it was forced to suspend use of Russian Soyuz rockets. Sunday’s flight brings the number of satellites now in orbit above the Earth to 462.»

«The firm, part owned by the British government, expects to complete the roll-out in the middle of next year.

The Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV), India’s largest and most capable rocket, lifted clear of the Satish Dhawan spaceport in the state of Andhra Pradesh»

«It will be some weeks before the ion engines on the spacecraft move them to their operational, 1,200km-high, polar orbits. OneWeb is already offering high-speed broadband connections to beta customers above 50 degrees North and South. This latest launch and another before the end of the year will pull coverage closer to the equator.»

* * * * * * *


Indian rocket launches 36 OneWeb satellites

The London-based satellite company, OneWeb, is back on track with the launch of another 36 spacecraft for its global broadband internet system.

The platforms went up on a GSLV rocket from Sriharikota island in India.

OneWeb’s efforts to deploy its telecommunications network had been on hold since March when it was forced to suspend use of Russian Soyuz rockets.

Sunday’s flight brings the number of satellites now in orbit above the Earth to 462.

This is more than 70% of the total OneWeb needs to achieve worldwide coverage with its first-generation constellation.

The firm, part owned by the British government, expects to complete the roll-out in the middle of next year.

The Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV), India’s largest and most capable rocket, lifted clear of the Satish Dhawan spaceport in the state of Andhra Pradesh at 00:07 on Sunday morning (19:37 BST, Saturday).

It took an hour and a half to get all the satellites unloaded at an altitude of 600km. It will be some weeks before the ion engines on the spacecraft move them to their operational, 1,200km-high, polar orbits.

The situation for OneWeb was looking very uncertain back in March.

The company’s plans were knocked off course by the war in Ukraine.

The conflict, and the resulting Western sanctions against Russia, led to the firm losing access to Russian Soyuz rockets.

With only two-thirds of its satellites in orbit, OneWeb had to move quickly to secure rides on other carriers. Deals were struck with American rocket providers SpaceX and Relativity Space, and India’s New Space India Limited, the commercial arm of India’s space agency, Isro, which markets the GSLV.

OneWeb is already offering high-speed broadband connections to beta customers above 50 degrees North and South. This latest launch and another before the end of the year will pull coverage closer to the equator.

“We need to get these launches away that we’re doing before Christmas, and that will enable us to turn on the service from 25 degrees North and 25 degrees South. Then we’ll complete the roll-out of the constellation by spring, which enables us to complete global commercial service by the end of next year,” OneWeb CEO Neil Masterson said.

The big news since March has been the proposed merger between OneWeb and Paris-headquartered Eutelsat.

The French firm operates telecommunications spacecraft higher in the sky in what’s termed Geostationary Orbit, at 36,000km in altitude. It is one of the biggest distributors in the world of direct-to-home TV.

The merger plan is currently working its way through the competition and regulatory approval process.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Commercio, Economia e Produzione Industriale

Malaysia. Export +30.1%, Import +33.0%, surplus commerciale +20.9% anno su anno.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-10-21.

Malaysia 001

                         Le esportazioni della Malesia sono aumentate del 30.1% a 144.31 miliardi di ringgit (30.57 miliardi di dollari USA) nel mese di settembre rispetto a un anno fa, come hanno mostrato i dati ufficiali mercoledì. La crescita delle esportazioni è stata favorita soprattutto dalla robusta domanda esterna di prodotti elettrici ed elettronici (E&E), prodotti petroliferi, gas naturale liquefatto (LNG), petrolio grezzo, apparecchiature ottiche e scientifiche, nonché macchinari, attrezzature e parti di ricambio.

                         Nel frattempo, il commercio malese è aumentato del 31.4% rispetto all’anno precedente, raggiungendo i 256.91 miliardi di ringgit (54.42 miliardi di dollari) a settembre. Anche le importazioni della Malesia sono salite del 33% a 112.60 miliardi di ringgit (23.85 miliardi di dollari). Il surplus commerciale della Malesia ha raggiunto un nuovo record, espandendosi del 20.9% a 31,71 miliardi di ringgit (6.72 miliardi di dollari).

                         Per il terzo trimestre del 2022, il commercio della Malesia è aumentato del 42% a 774.98 miliardi di ringgit (164.16 miliardi di dollari), rispetto al terzo trimestre del 2021. Le esportazioni del trimestre sono aumentate del 38.3% su base annua a 419.65 miliardi di ringgit (88.89 miliardi di dollari), mentre le importazioni sono cresciute del 46.5% a 355.32 miliardi di ringgit (75.26 miliardi di dollari).

* * * * * * *

«Malaysia’s exports increased by 30.1 percent to 144.31 billion ringgit (30.57 billion U.S. dollars) in September from a year ago, official data showed Wednesday. The export growth was contributed mainly by robust external demand for electrical and electronic (E&E) products, petroleum products, liquefied natural gas (LNG), crude petroleum, optical and scientific equipment as well as machinery, equipment and parts.»

«Meanwhile, Malaysia’s trade rose by 31.4 percent year on year to 256.91 billion ringgit (54.42 billion dollars) in September. Malaysia’s imports also climbed 33 percent to 112.60 billion ringgit (23.85 billion dollars). Malaysia’s trade surplus achieved a new record high, expanding by 20.9 percent to 31.71 billion ringgit (6.72 billion dollars).»

«For the third quarter of 2022, Malaysia’s trade edged up by 42 percent to 774.98 billion ringgit (164.16 billion dollars), compared to the third quarter of 2021. Exports for the quarter increased by 38.3 percent year on year to 419.65 billion ringgit (88.89 billion dollars) while imports expanded by 46.5 percent to 355.32 billion ringgit (75.26 billion dollars).»

* * * * * * *


Malaysia’s exports climb 30.1 pct in September

Kuala Lumpur, Oct. 19 (Xinhua) — Malaysia’s exports increased by 30.1 percent to 144.31 billion ringgit (30.57 billion U.S. dollars) in September from a year ago, official data showed Wednesday.

The export growth was contributed mainly by robust external demand for electrical and electronic (E&E) products, petroleum products, liquefied natural gas (LNG), crude petroleum, optical and scientific equipment as well as machinery, equipment and parts, the International Trade and Industry Ministry said in a statement.

According to the statement, exports of E&E products, optical and scientific equipment as well as LNG registered the highest monthly value thus far.

Meanwhile, Malaysia’s trade rose by 31.4 percent year on year to 256.91 billion ringgit (54.42 billion dollars) in September.

Malaysia’s imports also climbed 33 percent to 112.60 billion ringgit (23.85 billion dollars).

Malaysia’s trade surplus achieved a new record high, expanding by 20.9 percent to 31.71 billion ringgit (6.72 billion dollars).

For the third quarter of 2022, Malaysia’s trade edged up by 42 percent to 774.98 billion ringgit (164.16 billion dollars), compared to the third quarter of 2021.

Exports for the quarter increased by 38.3 percent year on year to 419.65 billion ringgit (88.89 billion dollars) while imports expanded by 46.5 percent to 355.32 billion ringgit (75.26 billion dollars).

In the first nine months of 2022, Malaysia’s trade climbed by 32.9 percent to 2.13 trillion ringgit (451.18 billion dollars) from the same period last year.

Exports for the period grew by 30.3 percent to 1.159 trillion ringgit (245.5 billion dollars) while imports expanded by 36.2 percent to 971.26 billion ringgit (205.73 billion dollars).

Pubblicato in: Commercio, Devoluzione socialismo, Economia e Produzione Industriale, Regno Unito

Regno Unito. Locali notturni. Dai 3,000 del 2005 agli attuali 1,130. Inflazione.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-09-11.

Deficit pubblico

Nel 2005 nel Regno Unito vi erano 3,000 locali notturni, discoteche incluse, che nel giugno 2022 si erano ridotti a 1,130. È uno dei tanti segni del declino economico

* * * * * * *

Secondo l’Associazione delle Industrie del Tempo Notturno (NTIA), il numero di locali notturni in Inghilterra, Scozia e Galles è sceso al minimo in oltre due decenni, con una chiusura su cinque negli ultimi tre anni. Se nel marzo 2020 erano stati registrati 1.418 locali aperti, nel giugno 2022 sono scesi a 1.130, dopo che i locali sono stati costretti a chiudere a causa della pandemia.

L’Inghilterra centrale e il Galles centrale hanno registrato un numero particolarmente elevato di chiusure negli ultimi tre anni, passando da 209 nel marzo 2020 a 150 nel giugno 2022 – un calo del 39%. Londra continua ad avere la più alta concentrazione di club di tutto il Regno Unito, con 221 registrati a giugno di quest’anno, sebbene anche questa cifra sia diminuita rispetto ai 497 del 2006.

L’indebitamento pandemico, le crescenti bollette energetiche, le sfide della forza lavoro, la catena di approvvigionamento, l’aumento dei premi assicurativi, le pressioni dei proprietari e gli aumenti dei costi dei prodotti. Le pressioni sui costi operativi, unite al fatto che i consumatori hanno meno reddito disponibile, hanno visto le prime fasi di una recessione con un rallentamento delle vendite dei biglietti e della frequenza dei visitatori. Come mostra il nostro grafico, i locali notturni sono in declino nel Regno Unito da ben prima della pandemia. Per questo motivo i locali sono stati costretti a chiudere definitivamente i battenti.

* * * * * * *

«The number of nightclubs in England, Scotland and Wales has dropped to its lowest in more than two decades, with one in five having closed over the past three years, according to the Night Time Industries Association (NTIA). Where 1,418 clubs were recorded as open in March 2020, this dropped to 1,130 in June 2022, after clubs were forced to shut down with the pandemic»

«Central England and Central Wales saw a particularly high number of closures over the past three years, falling from 209 in March 2020 to 150 in June 2022 – a 39 percent decrease. London still has the highest concentration of clubs of anywhere in the UK, with 221 recorded in June of this year, although even that figure has fallen from 497 in 2006.»

«pandemic debt, growing energy bills, workforce challenges, supply chain, increased insurance premiums, landlord pressures and product cost increases. Operating cost pressures coupled with consumers with less disposable income have seen the early stages of a recession with slowing ticket sales and visitor frequency. As our chart shows, night clubs have been on the decline in the UK since well before the pandemic. As reasons clubs have been eventually forced to shut their doors for good»

* * * * * * *


Night Clubs on the Decline in the UK.

The number of nightclubs in England, Scotland and Wales has dropped to its lowest in more than two decades, with one in five having closed over the past three years, according to the Night Time Industries Association (NTIA). Where 1,418 clubs were recorded as open in March 2020, this dropped to 1,130 in June 2022, after clubs were forced to shut down with the pandemic.

Central England and Central Wales saw a particularly high number of closures over the past three years, falling from 209 in March 2020 to 150 in June 2022 – a 39 percent decrease. London still has the highest concentration of clubs of anywhere in the UK, with 221 recorded in June of this year, although even that figure has fallen from 497 in 2006.

The NTIA explains that this decline comes down to a “perfect storm” of events, namely, “pandemic debt, growing energy bills, workforce challenges, supply chain, increased insurance premiums, landlord pressures and product cost increases.” The future outlook doesn’t look much better, as the trade body reports: “Operating cost pressures coupled with consumers with less disposable income have seen the early stages of a recession with slowing ticket sales and visitor frequency.”

As our chart shows, night clubs have been on the decline in the UK since well before the pandemic. Oxford University paper Cherwell cites “redevelopment programs, rising rents and unsympathetic councils” all as reasons clubs have been eventually forced to shut their doors for good.

Pubblicato in: Commercio, Devoluzione socialismo, Regno Unito, Senza categoria

Regno Unito. Cineworld ha presentato istanza di fallimento. 8.9 mld Usd.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-09-10.

2022-09-10__ Cineword 001

Il gruppo britannico Cineworld (CINE.L) ha presentato mercoledì la richiesta di protezione dalla bancarotta negli Stati Uniti, mentre il secondo operatore di catene cinematografiche al mondo lotta per contenere il suo enorme debito. Il deposito del Chapter 11, che consente alle aziende di rimanere in attività mentre cercano di ristrutturare il loro debito, coinvolge le attività di Cineworld negli Stati Uniti, nel Regno Unito e nel Jersey, che coprono la maggior parte delle sue attività.

Le società del gruppo hanno impegni per 1.94 miliardi di dollari da parte dei finanziatori esistenti e Cineworld prevede di gestire le sue attività globali e i suoi cinema come sempre durante il processo. Sebbene Cineworld abbia ribadito che non c’è alcuna garanzia di recupero per i detentori di partecipazioni esistenti, non si aspetta che l’archiviazione comporti una sospensione delle negoziazioni delle sue azioni a Londra.

Mentre l’industria cinematografica sta lottando per riprendersi dalla pandemia, il problema specifico di Cineworld è la quantità di debiti accumulati nel corso degli anni. Il suo debito netto, compresi i debiti di leasing, era di 8.9 miliardi di dollari alla fine del 2021. Escludendo i debiti di leasing, il debito netto era di 4.84 miliardi di dollari a quella data. Il valore di mercato della società era di circa 59 milioni di sterline (68 milioni di dollari) alla chiusura di mercoledì. Cineworld, che gestisce più di 9,000 schermi in 10 Paesi e impiega circa 28,000 persone, ha contratto debiti per finanziare parte dell’acquisto di Regal per 3.6 miliardi di dollari nel 2017 e per sopravvivere alla pandemia.

* * * * * * *

«Britain’s Cineworld Group (CINE.L) on Wednesday filed for bankruptcy protection in the United States as the world’s second-largest cinema chain operator struggles to rein in its massive debt. The Chapter 11 filing, which allows firms to stay in business while trying to restructure their debt, involves Cineworld’s U.S., UK and Jersey operations, covering the bulk of its business.»

«Group companies have $1.94 billion of commitments from existing lenders and Cineworld expects to operate its global business and cinemas as usual throughout the process, it added. While Cineworld reiterated there was no guarantee of any recovery for holders of existing equity interests, it does not expect the filing to result in a suspension of trading in its London shares»

«While the cinema industry has been struggling to recover from the pandemic, Cineworld’s specific issue is the amount of debt it has amassed over the years. Its net debt including lease liabilities stood at $8.9 billion at the end of 2021. Excluding lease liabilities, its net debt was $4.84 billion at that time. The company’s market value was about 59 million pounds ($68 million) at Wednesday’s close. Cineworld, which operates more than 9,000 screens across 10 countries and employs around 28,000 people, took on debt to fund part of its $3.6 billion purchase of Regal in 2017, and more to survive the pandemic.»

* * * * * * *


World’s second-largest movie chain operator Cineworld files for U.S. bankruptcy

– Cineworld’s battered shares rise almost 10%

– Bankruptcy process involves U.S, UK, Jersey business

– Expects to emerge from Chapter 11 in Q1 2023

* * * * * * *

Britain’s Cineworld Group (CINE.L) on Wednesday filed for bankruptcy protection in the United States as the world’s second-largest cinema chain operator struggles to rein in its massive debt.

The Chapter 11 filing, which allows firms to stay in business while trying to restructure their debt, involves Cineworld’s U.S., UK and Jersey operations, covering the bulk of its business.

Cineworld said it expected to emerge from Chapter 11 protection during the first quarter of 2023 and intended to pay all its vendors in full during the process as well as pay employees their usual wages.

Group companies have $1.94 billion of commitments from existing lenders and Cineworld expects to operate its global business and cinemas as usual throughout the process, it added.

Cineworld shares, which hit a record low of 1.80 pence after Wall Street Journal first reported its potential bankruptcy in August, settled 9.9% higher at 4.29 pence on Wednesday.

While Cineworld reiterated there was no guarantee of any recovery for holders of existing equity interests, it does not expect the filing to result in a suspension of trading in its London shares.

Cineworld also said it expected to change its real estate strategy in the United States and would engage with landlords to improve U.S. cinema lease terms.

While the cinema industry has been struggling to recover from the pandemic, Cineworld’s specific issue is the amount of debt it has amassed over the years.

Its net debt including lease liabilities stood at $8.9 billion at the end of 2021. Excluding lease liabilities, its net debt was $4.84 billion at that time. The company’s market value was about 59 million pounds ($68 million) at Wednesday’s close.

Cineworld, which operates more than 9,000 screens across 10 countries and employs around 28,000 people, took on debt to fund part of its $3.6 billion purchase of Regal in 2017, and more to survive the pandemic.

Two years ago, it abandoned plans to take over rival Cineplex (CGX.TO) and is in a legal dispute with the Canadian firm, which has sought C$1.23 billion ($946 million) in damages.

Pubblicato in: Commercio, Devoluzione socialismo, Regno Unito

Regno Unito. I pub servono acqua e molti sono falliti.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-09-06.

Inflazione 002

Regno Unito. Pub. La pinta di birra chiara è salita da 3.96 ad un massimo di 8 sterline.

* * * * * * *

I pub del Regno Unito si preparano a chiudere in massa a causa dell’impennata dei costi energetici

 Come migliaia di pub in tutta la Gran Bretagna, il Red Lion and Sun teme la rovina finanziaria quest’inverno a causa dell’aumento dei costi energetici. Situato in un verdeggiante sobborgo a nord di Londra, la bolletta energetica annuale del pub è destinata a più che quadruplicare quest’anno, passando da 16,000 sterline a 65,000 sterline (76,000 dollari), ha dichiarato James Cuthbertson, direttore di The Frisco Group, che gestisce il pub insieme ad altri due nella capitale e nel sud-est dell’Inghilterra. Dobbiamo trovare 50,000 sterline in più di profitto ogni anno, mentre i profitti si fermano perché i consumatori vedono aumentare i prezzi a casa.

Le piccole imprese britanniche che stanno negoziando nuovi contratti energetici per l’inverno devono affrontare in media un aumento dei prezzi di quattro o cinque volte rispetto agli accordi stipulati due anni fa. Nello stesso periodo, i prezzi all’ingrosso del gas naturale britannico sono aumentati di 14 volte. La scelta è tra aumentare i prezzi, tagliare il personale, ridurre gli orari di apertura o chiudere del tutto. L’anno scorso più di 400 pub britannici hanno chiuso i battenti a causa della pandemia. Oltre all’aumento dei costi dei fattori chiave del processo di produzione della birra, come il luppolo e l’anidride carbonica, i pub, come gran parte dell’industria britannica, devono far fronte anche all’aumento dei costi del personale. La notte sono a letto a preoccuparmi di come diavolo farò a rimanere a galla.

* * * * * * *

«UK pubs brace for mass closures as energy costs soar»

«Like thousands of pubs across Britain, the Red Lion and Sun fears financial ruin this winter as its energy costs surge. Nestled in a leafy north London suburb, the pub’s annual energy bill is on course to more than quadruple this year to 65,000 pounds ($76,000) from 16,000 pounds, said James Cuthbertson, a director of The Frisco Group, which manages the pub along with two others in the capital and southeast England. We need to come up with an extra 50,000 pounds in profits each year, at the same time that profits are coming to a standstill as consumers see their own prices rise at home»

«Small UK businesses negotiating new energy contracts for the winter face on average a four- or five-fold price increase compared with deals made two years ago. Over the same period, British wholesale natural gas prices have risen 14-fold. The choice is between raising prices, cutting staff, reducing opening hours, or closing entirely. More than 400 British pubs closed down last year in the wake of pandemic lockdowns. As well as correspondingly higher costs for key inputs to the brewing process such as hops and carbon dioxide, pubs are – like much of British industry – also facing rising staff costs. I’m lying in bed at night worrying how the hell I’m going to stay afloat»

* * * * * * *


Last orders: UK pubs brace for mass closures as energy costs soar

– Pandemic-hit pubs face huge energy bill challenge

– No price cap on soaring business energy rates

– New UK prime minister under immediate pressure to act

* * * * * * *

London, Sept 1 (Reuters) – Like thousands of pubs across Britain, the Red Lion and Sun fears financial ruin this winter as its energy costs surge, just as business was starting to recover from the fallow years of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Nestled in a leafy north London suburb, the pub’s annual energy bill is on course to more than quadruple this year to 65,000 pounds ($76,000) from 16,000 pounds, said James Cuthbertson, a director of The Frisco Group, which manages the pub along with two others in the capital and southeast England.

“We need to come up with an extra 50,000 pounds in profits each year, at the same time that profits are coming to a standstill as consumers see their own prices rise at home,” he said.

The Red Lion and Sun’s dilemma is typical. Figures from energy analysts Cornwall Insight show that small UK businesses negotiating new energy contracts for the winter face on average a four- or five-fold price increase compared with deals made two years ago.

Over the same period, British wholesale natural gas prices have risen 14-fold, including a doubling since Russia invaded Ukraine in February.

For Cuthbertson and others in his position, the choice is between raising prices, cutting staff, reducing opening hours, or closing entirely.

More than 400 British pubs closed down last year in the wake of pandemic lockdowns, according to a British real estate analysis company, and that number could rocket.

“It is extraordinarily difficult to see how good local community pubs are going to find their way through,” said Emma McClarkin, chief executive officer of the British Beer and Pub Association (BBPA).

Almost two thirds of British hospitality businesses are currently in the red, according to research from the BBPA, the British Institute of Innkeeping, and UK Hospitality.

                         PUB LUNCH WITH WATER

Cuthbertson said the Red Lion and Sun had cut back on lighting and could not rule out having to shut down over winter.

Keris de Villiers, who owns three pubs in south London, said raising prices, even by 20 just pence per pint, would really affect her regulars. “Many … are elderly and are struggling to afford to heat their homes,” she said.

Surging consumer price inflation – which hit a 40-year high of 10.1% in July and is set to rise further – will also limit the amount of money Britons have to spend on going out.

As well as correspondingly higher costs for key inputs to the brewing process such as hops and carbon dioxide, pubs are – like much of British industry – also facing rising staff costs.

The Bank of England forecasts Britain’s economy will slip into recession later this year and remain there throughout 2023.

“Trips to the pub will be few and far between in the months to come,” Hargreaves Lansdown analyst Susannah Streeter predicted.

Drinkers at the Red Lion and Sun were already cutting back, Cuthbertson said.

“I’ve seen three of our regulars in a single day choosing tap water over a pint to go with their lunch,” he said. “I’d maybe seen that only once a month before this.”

Further up the food chain, major publicly listed pub owners including Mitchells & Butlers and J D Wetherspoon have reported slower sales growth and potential losses this year due to rising costs. When British pubs and bars were closed outright during the COVID-19 pandemic, the state intervened with emergency funds.

Today, any similar intervention remains uncertain, as the government has said no new policies will be decided on before a new prime minister is announced on Sept. 5.

“I’m lying in bed at night worrying how the hell I’m going to stay afloat,” said Cuthbertson. ($1 = 0.8599 pounds).

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Commercio, Devoluzione socialismo

Germania. Consumatori imbufaliti dalla Shrinkflation. Inflazione mascherata.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-08-20.

2022-08-18__ Forget Inflation. Shrinkflation Is Sparking Fury in Germany 001

Nota.

«Shrinkflation is the practice of reducing the size of a product while maintaining its sticker price. Raising the price per given amount is a strategy employed by companies, mainly in the food and beverage industries, to stealthily boost profit margins or maintain them in the face of rising input costs.»

«Unione delle parole inglesi shrink (stringere) e inflation (inflazione), il termine indica una sempre più diffusa tecnica di marketing che consiste nel ridurre la quantità di prodotto in una confezione lasciando il prezzo assoluto invariato»

* * * * * * *

Gli acquirenti sono sempre più arrabbiati per i tentativi di aumentare i prezzi dei prodotti in modo furtivo. Sebbene la cosiddetta shrinkflation – in cui il costo di un prodotto rimane invariato anche se le sue dimensioni diminuiscono – non sia un fenomeno nuovo, le autorità per la tutela dei consumatori della prima economia europea sono inondate di reclami. La sola sede di Amburgo ne ha ricevute circa 100 nelle ultime due settimane, un record da tre a cinque volte superiore alla norma.

L’elenco dei pacchetti bluff del gruppo include un’inflazione del 14% per gli orsetti gommosi e del 20% per le patatine. I produttori hanno definito un salto di prezzo del 25% per alcune margarine un passo eccezionale in tempi difficili causati da un drammatico aumento dei costi in tutta la catena di approvvigionamento, comprese le materie prime.

I prezzi dei prodotti alimentari sono il principale motore dell’inflazione tedesca dopo l’energia, con un aumento annuo del 14% a luglio, quasi il doppio rispetto all’indice generale. Quello che stiamo vedendo ora è solo l’inizio. Tra la vendita di merci in confezioni vecchie e la progettazione, produzione e consegna di quelle nuove, i preparativi per gli aumenti occulti dei prezzi richiedono circa metà anno. L’inflazione tedesca raggiungerà un picco del 9,1% in questo trimestre, prima di scendere gradualmente verso il 2%.

* * * * * * *

«Shoppers getting increasingly angry at attempts to hike goods prices by stealth. While so-called shrinkflation — where the cost of a product stays the same though its size declines — isn’t a new phenomenon, consumer-protection authorities in Europe’s top economy are being inundated by complaints. Its Hamburg branch alone received about 100 in the past two weeks — a record that’s three to five times above the norm.»

«The group’s list of  bluff packages includes 14 per cent inflation for gummy bears and 20 per cent for potato chips. Manufacturers have called a 25 per cent price jump for some margarines an exceptional step in difficult times caused by dramatic cost increases across the whole supply chain, including raw materials.»

«Food prices are the biggest driver of German inflation after energy, rising at an annual pace of 14 per cent in July — almost twice as much as the overall index. What we’re seeing now is really just the beginning. Between selling goods in old packaging and planning, producing and delivering new ones, preparations for covert price increases take about half a year. German inflation will peak at 9.1 per cent this quarter before gradually falling toward two per cent»

* * * * * * *


Forget Inflation. Shrinkflation Is Sparking Fury in Germany

Shoppers getting increasingly angry at attempts to hike goods prices by stealth.

While so-called shrinkflation — where the cost of a product stays the same though its size declines — isn’t a new phenomenon, consumer-protection authorities in Europe’s top economy are being inundated by complaints.

Its Hamburg branch alone received about 100 in the past two weeks — a record that’s three to five times above the norm.

The group’s list of “bluff packages” includes 14 per cent inflation for gummy bears and 20 per cent for potato chips. Manufacturers have called a 25 per cent price jump for some margarines an “exceptional step in difficult times” caused by “dramatic cost increases across the whole supply chain, including raw materials.”

Food prices are the biggest driver of German inflation after energy, rising at an annual pace of 14 per cent in July — almost twice as much as the overall index. That’s stretching the budgets of low-income households which, after more than two years of pandemic disruptions, have dwindling cash buffers.

“What we’re seeing now is really just the beginning,” according to Armin Valet, a nutrition specialist at the consumer-protection authority in Hamburg. He struggles to think of any product group without examples.

“Between selling goods in old packaging and planning, producing and delivering new ones, preparations for covert price increases take about half a year,” he said. “Experience suggests this shrinkflation scam will be heavily used in the fall, winter and early next year.”

Germany’s statistics office is aware of what’s happening and says it isn’t fooled by such tactics. Price collectors tracking the costs of more than 300,000 goods and services each month also make note of the volumes they’re offered in. Prices are then converted so data reflect consumers’ pain.

German inflation will peak at 9.1 per cent this quarter before gradually falling toward two per cent, Bloomberg Economics predicts.

Pubblicato in: Agricoltura, Commercio, Stati Uniti

Usa. Un panino 18 Usd, una libbra di pomodori 12 Usd, patatine fritte 15 Usd.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-08-12.

Lavrov Putin che ridono 011

Saper interpretare correttamente i macrodati è sia una scienza sia una arte che richiedono vaste conoscenze : ma non tutti sono tenuti a dominare questo settore. Ogni persona ha il suo campo in cui eccelle.

Qui riportiamo invece i costi che qualsiasi persona vive tutti i santi giorni quando si prende un sandwich oppure un cartoccio di patatine fritte.

I dati sono stati rilevati a New York.

A nostro sommesso avviso le elezioni di midterm saranno determinate proprio dalla inflazione. Ma non era la Russia che sarebbe dovuta fallire?

* * * * * * *

Nota.

Pound: a unit of weight equal to 16 oz. avoirdupois (0.4536 kg), or 12 oz. troy (0.3732 kg). A troy ounce is a unit of measure used for weighing precious metals that dates back to the Middle Ages. Originally used in Troyes, France, one troy ounce is equal to 31.1034768 grams.

Bagel: a dense bread roll in the shape of a ring, made by boiling dough and then baking it.

Guacamole: a dish of mashed avocado mixed with chopped onion, tomatoes, chilli peppers, and seasoning.

* * * * * * *

Mentre gli affitti e il costo delle corse Uber hanno raggiunto livelli da capogiro, l’aumento dei prezzi dei generi alimentari è uno dei risultati più dolorosi dell’inflazione. A maggio, i prezzi dei generi alimentari nell’area di New York sono aumentati al ritmo annuale più rapido dal 1981. I prezzi dei generi alimentari erano ancora più alti del 9.1% rispetto all’anno precedente a New York e del 10.4% a livello nazionale. Il numero di bambini che visitano le dispense alimentari è aumentato del 55% all’inizio dell’anno rispetto a prima della pandemia.

3.50 dollari per un bagel con crema di formaggio e 1.50 dollari per un caffè caldo in un carretto. Poiché i prezzi elevati di cibo e benzina hanno messo a dura prova il suo budget, a volte salta la colazione o il pranzo per far fronte ai suoi 700 dollari di affitto mensile, o fa acquisti nei negozi da 99 centesimi. Il suo salario orario è recentemente aumentato del 5.4%, da 24.62 a 25.95 dollari.

Gli è costato 3.75 dollari per una pallina di gelato alla fragola, un ordine che è aumentato di 25 centesimi quest’estate. Ha anche comprato una scatola di dolci, tra cui una porzione di tiramisù da 7 dollari, che è aumentata di 50 centesimi. Non volete arrabbiarvi troppo, perché sapete che anche i ristoratori stanno pagando un prezzo elevato, quindi provate empatia, ma siete arrabbiati per l’aumento dei prezzi. Un nuovo frigorifero ha impiegato più di un anno per arrivare. I prezzi del burro sono aumentati, in parte a causa degli alti costi dei mangimi per il bestiame, esacerbati dalla siccità in alcune parti degli Stati Uniti.

18 dollari per un panino. Ha speso 30.48 dollari: un caffè freddo a 4 dollari, un panino con gamberi e scalogno a 18 dollari e una torta di riso ai frutti di bosco a 6 dollari. Hanno aumentato i prezzi per far fronte all’aumento dei costi del cibo e della manodopera, ma non hanno voluto specificare di quanto. Secondo il Dipartimento dell’Agricoltura degli Stati Uniti, il prezzo delle uova, ingrediente di molti prodotti Win Son, dovrebbe aumentare del 78% quest’anno, dopo che una grave epidemia di influenza aviaria ha decimato gli allevamenti di polli e ridotto la produzione di uova.

8 dollari per i mirtilli. È rimasta scioccata nello scoprire che una libbra di frutti di bosco costava almeno 8 dollari. Poiché la guerra in Ucraina ha limitato la fornitura di petrolio, i prezzi elevati del gas hanno reso più costoso per i camion del signor Migliorelli trasportare i prodotti a 100 miglia dalla Hudson Valley alla città. Il prezzo dei fertilizzanti è salito alle stelle, esacerbato dalle interruzioni della catena di approvvigionamento e delle esportazioni dovute alla guerra. Una libbra di pomodori ciliegini al suo stand costa ora 12 dollari, contro i 10 dell’anno scorso.

15 dollari per le patatine fritte. Ha ordinato un cocktail di gin e vodka blu neon per 20 dollari, e poi ha diviso 15 dollari di patatine fritte e 19 dollari di patatine con guacamole.

* * * * * * *

«While rent and the cost of Uber trips have reached eye-popping levels, rising food prices are among the most painful results of inflation. In May, food prices in the New York City area rose at their fastest annual pace since 1981. Food prices were still 9.1 percent higher than a year earlier in New York and 10.4 percent higher nationwide. The number of children visiting food pantries was 55 percent higher earlier this year than it was before the pandemic»

«$3.50 for an everything bagel with plain cream cheese and $1.50 for a hot coffee at a street cart. Since high food and gas prices have strained his budget, he will sometimes skip breakfast or lunch to make his $700 monthly rent, or shop at 99-cent stores. His hourly wage recently increased by 5.4 percent, from $24.62 to $25.95»

«It cost him $3.75 for one scoop of strawberry ice cream, an order that increased by 25 cents this summer. He also bought a box of pastries, including a $7 portion of tiramisù, which increased by 50 cents. You almost don’t want to get too mad because you know the restaurant owners are also paying a hefty priceSo you feel empathy, but you’re upset about the price increases. A new refrigerator took more than a year to arrive. Butter prices have surged, partly because of high costs for cattle feed, exacerbated by a drought in parts of the United States»

«$18 for a Sandwich. He spent $30.48 — a cold brew coffee for $4, a shrimp scallion pancake sandwich for $18 and a berry rice cake for $6. They have increased prices to deal with rising food and labor costs, but declined to detail by how much. The price of eggs, an ingredient in several Win Son items, is projected to jump 78 percent this year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, after a major bird flu outbreak decimated chicken flocks and lowered egg production.»

«$8 for Blueberries. She was shocked to discover that a pint of berries was now at least $8. As the war in Ukraine constrained the supply of oil, high gas prices made it more expensive for Mr. Migliorelli’s trucks to drive produce 100 miles from the Hudson Valley to the city. The price of fertilizer has soared, exacerbated by the supply-chain and export disruptions of the war. A pound of cherry tomatoes at his stand is now $12, up from $10 last year»

«$15 for French Fries. She ordered a neon blue gin and vodka cocktail for $20, and then split $15 French fries and $19 chips with guacamole»

* * * * * * *


$15 French Fries and $18 Sandwiches: Inflation Hits New York

As food prices rise at the fastest rate in decades, it’s become more expensive to eat and drink in New York City.

This was supposed to be a summer of long-awaited celebrations in New York City, the return of a packed calendar full of birthday dinners and happy hours. But New Yorkers are confronting sticker shock everywhere they look, whether they’re shopping for barbecue supplies at the grocery store, ordering a beer after work or grabbing a late-night slice of pizza.

While rent and the cost of Uber trips have reached eye-popping levels, rising food prices are among the most painful results of inflation. In May, food prices in the New York City area rose at their fastest annual pace since 1981, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The effects have been especially visible throughout the city — everybody has to eat.

The increase slowed in June, the most recent inflation report showed, but food prices were still 9.1 percent higher than a year earlier in New York and 10.4 percent higher nationwide.

Rising prices have come for beloved New York staples like the ice cream cones at Mister Softee trucks and the bacon, egg and cheese sandwiches at bodegas. And they have worsened the city’s hunger crisis; the number of children visiting food pantries was 55 percent higher earlier this year than it was before the pandemic, according to City Harvest, the largest food rescue organization in New York City.

Many restaurants and bars that survived the pandemic resisted raising prices last year, afraid of scaring away customers during a fragile recovery. Now, as businesses have increased wages to attract workers in a competitive labor market while facing soaring food and energy costs, higher prices are popping up on menus across the city.

We followed five New Yorkers last month during their weekly eating routines to document where they were seeing the effects of inflation.

                         $3.50 for a Bagel

On a recent Monday morning, shortly after arriving at work, Mamadu Jalloh paid $3.50 for an everything bagel with plain cream cheese and $1.50 for a hot coffee at a street cart near his job in Queens, where he works at a nonprofit organization that helps formerly homeless adults.

The cart’s owner, Ali Apdelwyhap, had just raised coffee prices by 50 cents. Almost every single item in his cart had become more expensive, even the bags of ice he uses to store drinks. He was hesitant to go beyond 50 cents, worried his regulars — who include a large number of construction workers — would stop coming. “It’s too much for people,” he said.

Before the pandemic, Mr. Apdelwyhap’s breakfast cart had been parked in Midtown, serving lawyers and bankers who seemed less sensitive to price increases. Now, with most office workers no longer commuting five days a week, he said he can’t sustain his business there. He settled on this new corner along the northeastern waterfront in Queens after noticing construction sites nearby, hoping it would be a place where workers were required to show up in person.

Mr. Jalloh, 28, is one of them, driving in five days a week from his home in the South Bronx. Since high food and gas prices have strained his budget, he will sometimes skip breakfast or lunch to make his $700 monthly rent, or shop at 99-cent stores.

His hourly wage recently increased by 5.4 percent, from $24.62 to $25.95, as part of a citywide cost-of-living adjustment given to certain nonprofit workers. But, Mr. Jalloh said, it has done little to defray the impact of inflation. “It’s helping, but it’s not really helping,” he said.

                         $3.75 for Ice Cream

Patrick Dunne, a second-year medical student, stopped by Veniero’s Pasticceria & Caffe, a bakery in the East Village of Manhattan, for a midday snack. It cost him $3.75 for one scoop of strawberry ice cream, an order that increased by 25 cents this summer. He also bought a box of pastries, including a $7 portion of tiramisù, which increased by 50 cents.

Mr. Dunne, 25, brought the pastries back to his family in the Bronx. He moved in with them after leaving his Manhattan apartment early in the pandemic, and now, with rents surging, he cannot afford his own place.

Mr. Dunne was excited about a summer of eating out with friends, but on days when he has hospital shifts, he more frequently brings granola bars from home or eats from the dollar menu at McDonald’s.

“You almost don’t want to get too mad because you know the restaurant owners are also paying a hefty price,” he said. “So you feel empathy, but you’re upset about the price increases.”

At Veniero’s, the staff was juggling an onslaught of pandemic disruptions. A new refrigerator took more than a year to arrive. Butter prices have surged, partly because of high costs for cattle feed, exacerbated by a drought in parts of the United States. A waitress who quit because she was unvaccinated has not yet been replaced.

Robert Zerilli, the fourth-generation owner, said he “had no choice” but to raise prices last month. “We have to make a profit,” he said.

                         $18 for a Sandwich

During his lunch break on a work-from-home day, Mychal Lopez, 32, walked to Win Son Bakery, a Taiwanese cafe near his apartment in Brooklyn’s East Williamsburg neighborhood. He spent $30.48 — a cold brew coffee for $4, a shrimp scallion pancake sandwich for $18 and a berry rice cake for $6.

The owners of Win Son said they have increased prices to deal with rising food and labor costs, but declined to detail by how much. The price of eggs, an ingredient in several Win Son items, is projected to jump 78 percent this year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, after a major bird flu outbreak decimated chicken flocks and lowered egg production.

Mr. Lopez said the coffee at Win Son was still cheaper than the typical price in Midtown, where he commutes four days a week to his job for a fashion retailer. The average price of a 16-ounce cold brew around there is $4.88, according to the prices listed at 13 coffee shops.

Mr. Lopez said he has been bringing lunch to the office more after he recently paid $6 for a matcha latte in Midtown. “It’s symptomatic of New York,” he said, sighing. “You’re just like, this is what I need to do to live in the city and get through the day.”

                         $8 for Blueberries

For years, Margaret Rodgers, a retiree who lives in Astoria, Queens, has shopped for fruits and vegetables at the Union Square farmers’ market in Manhattan. She keeps track of her food budget by filling a pouch with $80 in cash. But lately, the pouch has emptied after just two trips to the market. She was shocked to discover that a pint of berries was now at least $8.

“For the first time in my life, I am really feeling the effects of the increasing cost of food,” said Ms. Rodgers, 79.

Ken Migliorelli, who sells produce at the market from his family farm in Dutchess County, said he has had to raise prices across the board. As the war in Ukraine constrained the supply of oil, high gas prices made it more expensive for Mr. Migliorelli’s trucks to drive produce 100 miles from the Hudson Valley to the city. The price of fertilizer has soared, exacerbated by the supply-chain and export disruptions of the war.

This year, Mr. Migliorelli raised the price of blueberries by $2 to $3; they’re now $8 a pint. A pound of peaches rose to $5, from $3.50 last year.

Zaid Kurdieh of Norwich Meadow Farms, another vendor at the Union Square market, said he is trying to minimize price increases on staples like zucchini and carrots, but plans to raise prices by as much as 30 percent on items that are in demand at high-end restaurants, like baby squash. A pound of cherry tomatoes at his stand is now $12, up from $10 last year.

“I can’t keep up with expenses at the moment,” Mr. Kurdieh said. “I’m not seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.”

                         $15 for French Fries

After a day of work, Kathy Li met up with a colleague at the Skylark, a cocktail bar near Times Square. She ordered a neon blue gin and vodka cocktail for $20, and then split $15 French fries and $19 chips with guacamole — a price she described as “ridiculous.”

Ms. Li, 30, said the financial firm where she works provides free breakfast, lunch and snacks, which frees up her budget to go out frequently for drinks or dinner.

This summer, the Skylark raised prices on its chips and guacamole by $1.25 after avocado prices skyrocketed. (The United States temporarily suspended avocado imports from the Mexican state of Michoacan after a U.S. inspector there faced a safety threat.)

Because of the pandemic, the bar stayed shut until October 2021, and then the Omicron variant prompted widespread cancellations of holiday parties in December, typically the bar’s most lucrative month, according to David Rabin, a Skylark co-owner.

Mr. Rabin has been trying to recover from those losses while also contending with high employee turnover. He increased wages for some managers and spent more on training new hires for positions like security guards.

Mr. Rabin and the bar’s managers had a monthslong debate about whether to raise alcohol prices by $1 and charge $20 per cocktail, a threshold that Mr. Rabin had long resisted.

“We’re not trying to make anyone feel like we’re trying to fleece them,” Mr. Rabin said. But after noticing similar bars in the area charging at least $20, the bar owners decided to make the move. “It has become, unfortunately, the norm,” he said.