Pubblicato in: Cina, Devoluzione socialismo, Stati Uniti

Cina. Blocca le pellicole della Disney-Marvel. Contenuti contrari ai principi cinesi.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-01-27.

Cina 017

Il problema non è nuovo.

Cina. Il film The Battle of Lake Changjin visto da 633 milioni di persone. Hollywood nei triboli.

Hollywood. Sta perdendo il grande mercato cinese. Troppo liberal.

Bbc. Bandita dalla Cina perché propala fake news. – Xinhua e Bbc.

Cina. Si ribella alla femminilizzazione dei suoi maschi. Li vuole virili.

EU – Cina. La guerra delle TV sale. Vodafone Germany blocca la CGTN.

Cina. Sbrigativo giro di vite sugli stili di vita effeminati che depravano i giovani.

Cina. “Homosexuality as a “psychological disorder” in a university textbook”.

Cina. Bando dei videogames, ‘electronic drugs’. Mr Xi vuole tutelare la gioventù.

Cina. Si ribella alla femminilizzazione dei suoi maschi. Li vuole virili.

* * * * * * *

«If you get in bed with the devil, don’t be surprised when you get burned»

«That’s a lesson that Hollywood is learning after the communists shut out all four of Disney’s Marvel movies from releasing in China last year»

«Those movies were Disney’s highest-grossing of 2021, which means the home of Mickey-Mouse took a major hit in the pocketbook by being frozen out by the Chi-coms»

«→→ Never has an industry deserved this kind of pantsing more than Hollywood ←←»

«The ultra-liberal institution has courted the Chinese for decades, ignoring human rights abuses while virtue signaling about the most mundane things domestically»

«Hollywood has always known what was hiding behind the curtain, but they suckled at the communist teet anyway»

«Further, in bowing to China, the movie industry often ignored the wants and desires of its own citizens, producing sub-par»

«Hollywood arrogantly flew too close to the sun, and I think it’s all downhill from here»

* * * * * * *

Il problema è davvero molto semplice.

Le pellicole prodotte da Hollywood grondano di tematiche particolarmente invise e sgradite da parte dei cinesi.

Non esiste pellicola che non inneggi i gay, specie poi le lesbiche, con lunghe scene di rapporti di tal fatta.

Leitmotiv ossessivo è la supremazia esistenziale del femminile, con personaggi a cromosomi XY che sono femminielli prostrati in adorazione di codesto dogma.

Le femmine protagoniste sono tutte straricche con lavori da oltre il milione, ottenuto in virtù delle quote rosa.

I personaggi di colore sovrabbondano, un must liberal, ma sono alieni ai cinesi che non comprendono cosa ci entrino a fare.

I rari personaggi asiatici sono relegati al ruolo di burattini da dileggiare, oppure dei cattivi di turno.

Infine, da ultimo ma non certo per ultimo, vi è un continuo peana alla ideologia liberal, alla supremazia americana ed occidentale, quando poi non vi siano assunzioni lesive la dignità nazionale cinese, specie poi la sua integrità territoriale

Poi, gli americani si stupiscono che i cinesi vietino la circolazione sul loro territorio di siffatte pellicole.

Sono irredimibili.

* * * * * * *


China declares war on Hollywood, stop Disney-Marvel movies

Beijing has declared war on Hollywood. Last year, the Chinese authorities blocked the theatrical release of all four films produced by Disney-Marvel. A sign, according to observers, of the leeway that China intends to place on the penetration of its market by the US majors. But, at the origin of this choice, there would not be the wider political and commercial tensions with Washington, but the idea of ​​transforming the national film industry into a means to guide the masses and pursue the political objectives of the regime.

The Chinese one, Rebecca Davis, China correspondent for Variety, explains to Axios, “is a real departure from the global entertainment industry”. Paul Dergarabedian, an analyst at Comscore, underlines instead that “the pandemic has put China in a better position to control theatrical releases” on its territory.

Despite Disney’s efforts to please the Beijing authorities, its highest grossing, all Marvel titles, have not been cleared. At the base of the decisions, officially, there would have been disputes relating to the way in which some characters were represented, or other problems related to comments made by the directors or actors of the films.

It was, explains Shawn Robbins, chief analyst at Boxoffice pro, of “political” choices, which prevented the Disney-Marvel films from accessing the rich Chinese market, on which they would have a “very positive impact”. The stop in Beijing, however, did not only concern Marvel films. According to Variety, the market share of US films in China has shrunk overall from 46% in 2020 to 39% in 2021. This, while the market share of Chinese films increased. Of all foreign films screened in Chinese cinemas last year, only 28% were newly released films, the rest were previously produced films.

As Aynne Kokas, a communications professor at the University of Virginia, explains to Axios, Beijing’s leadership has set the goal of making China a “strong film powerhouse” by 2035. Meanwhile, China in both 2020 and 2021 overtook the US for tickets sold in cinemas. A result largely due to nationally produced films, compared to about 34 foreign films that each year get the green light from Chinese censorship.

The huge Chinese market also allows domestically produced films not to necessarily aim for a global audience to get big box office hits. It is enough for Chinese films to be successful on the domestic market, explains Dergarabedian. According to an analysis carried out by Axios, of the 200 highest box office takings in China last year, 44 were domestic films, 80 were produced in North America and 76 from other parts of the world. The 44 Chinese films also achieved low grosses outside the national borders.

According to Davis, the Chinese project to create a strong national film industry is not only aimed at countering the US cultural ‘soft power’, of which Hollywood is a powerful vehicle, but also serves to convey the messages of the Communist Party to the masses. An example above all, the great success in 2021 of the Chinese film ‘Battle for Lake Changjin’, one of the highest grossing in the history of cinema in China, a real war propaganda film, which magnifies the fight of the Chinese army against the USA during the Korean War.

Another recently released film, ‘Embrace Again’, employs some of China’s most popular stars to spread Beijing’s narrative of the pandemic, completely ignoring the government’s mistakes in the early stages of the virus spread nationwide and globally. The film was a blockbuster during the end-of-year holidays.

However, despite the efforts of the regime, Chinese public interest in Hollywood films has not waned, as the prevailing online piracy demonstrates. With the spread of streaming services, the US film industry is less dependent on the traditional business model, based on the sale of tickets at the box office, even if companies like Netflix are prevented from entering the Chinese market. But, Dergarabedian points out, the Chinese market “can still make a difference” in terms of success or failure for a film’s global ticket sales.

* * * * * * *


China Gives Hollywood the Pantsing It Deserves.

If you get in bed with the devil, don’t be surprised when you get burned. That’s a lesson that Hollywood is learning after the communists shut out all four of Disney’s Marvel movies from releasing in China last year.

Those movies were Disney’s highest-grossing of 2021, which means the home of Mickey-Mouse took a major hit in the pocketbook by being frozen out by the Chi-coms.

Never has an industry deserved this kind of pantsing more than Hollywood. The ultra-liberal institution has courted the Chinese for decades, ignoring human rights abuses while virtue signaling about the most mundane things domestically (see: Georgia’s voting law). In doing so, Hollywood tied itself to a tyrannical state that was always looking to eventually box them out, and that’s exactly what’s happening now.

China’s goal is to continue to grow its domestic entertainment industry into a dominant force. That isn’t coming via free-market competition either. Rather, it comes from the CCP banning American media products in order to capitalize on increased domestic revenues and controlled messaging. For Xi Jinping and his cohorts, everything is a propaganda opportunity, with few bigger than the big screen. Hollywood has always known what was hiding behind the curtain, but they suckled at the communist teet anyway.

Further, in bowing to China, the movie industry often ignored the wants and desires of its own citizens, producing sub-par, one-sided, overly preachy content. While Hollywood relentlessly lectured normal Americans from their faux moral perch about climate change and transgenderism, they ignored actual atrocities happening in China because they were effectively being paid off.

Now, despite the often embarrassing efforts to keep the communist dollars flowing, Hollywood is being kicked to the curb anyway, left to beg Chinese officials for a chance to nibble at the apple. There’s certainly some poetic justice in that.

As to where things go from here, I suppose the movie industry will come crawling back to Americans, begging them to once again increase their intake of largely garbage content. I doubt that happens, though. Hollywood arrogantly flew too close to the sun, and I think it’s all downhill from here.

* * * * * * *


Cina. Saranno bandite ditte ed istituzioni implicate nelle sanzioni occidentali.

Cina. Impone nuove sanzioni a personaggi americani e canadesi.

Cina. Impone sanzioni su personalità ed istituzioni del Regno Unito.

Cina. Non solo sanzioni. Ancor peggio è il boicottaggio popolare.

Cina. Inizia il boicottaggio delle imprese occidentali. Versace, Zara & Co.

La Cina boicotta Dolce & Gabbana: “hanno offeso la madrepatria”

Sanzioni. Attenti, che la Cina le fa per davvero.

Cina. Le severe sanzioni all’Australia sono un drastico monito per tutto il mondo.

Cina mette dazi severi sull’orzo australiano. Relazioni deteriorate.

Cina. Adesso è lei ad imporre le sanzioni. Il caso della Australia.

Cina. Diffida la Walmart Inc che boicotta i prodotti dello Xinjiang.

Lituania. Cina bandisce le società che hanno rapporti con la Lituania. Vilnius ed EU sulla brace.

Lituania. Blinken e Simonyte e le sanzione imposte dalla Cina. Lituania sulla brace.

Lituania. Cina bandisce le società che hanno rapporti con la Lituania. Vilnius ed EU sulla brace.

Pubblicato in: Cina, Devoluzione socialismo, Diplomazia, Unione Europea

Lituania. Le multinazionali tedesche premono a favore della Cina. Smacco della EU.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-01-26.

Lituania__001

La Cina considera Formosa suo territorio nazionale. La Lituania ha invitato Taiwan ad aprire a Viluns una rappresentanza con tal nome.

La Cina ha bandito dal commercio cinese chiunque avesse mantenuto rapporti economici o commerciali con la Lituania.

Le società tedesche coinvolte ingiungono quindi alla Lituania di desistere da simile atteggiamento, pena l’abbandono e la scelta per la Cina.

«Lithuania has become a no-go zone in China»

* * * * * * *

Lituania. Blinken e Simonyte e le sanzione imposte dalla Cina. Lituania sulla brace.

Lituania. Cina bandisce le società che hanno rapporti con la Lituania. Vilnius ed EU sulla brace.

Russia espelle sette diplomatici della Slovakia, Lituania, Lettonia ed Estonia.

Unione Europea e Visegrad. Scontro (quasi) finale. La Lituania.

Lituania. Altra débâcle socialista. Socialdemocratici crollano al 15.5%.

CEEC. 2020. Interscambio per 103.5 mld Usd, +8.4%, nonostante l’epidemia.

China’s European Diplomacy

Asia alla conquista dell’Europa dell’Est.

* * * * * * *

«China views …. Taiwan as its territory»

«The covert form of trade sanctions came into being after Lithuania recently invited Taiwan, which China claims as its own territory, to open a “representative office” in Vilnius.»

«Taiwan has other offices in Europe and the United States but they use the name of the city Taipei, avoiding reference to the island itself»

«China has told multinationals to sever ties with Lithuania or face being shut out of the Chinese market»

* * * * * * *

«German big business piles pressure on Lithuania in China row»

«Multinationals dragged into dispute by Lithuania blockade»

«Companies urge Lithuania to back down»

«Lithuania is under pressure from German companies to back down in a dispute with China to end a blockade of the Baltic state»

«China has pressed multinationals to sever ties with Lithuania or face exclusion from its market, an unusually harsh move that has dragged companies into a political dispute and placed Beijing on a collision course with the European Union»

«The row erupted after the Baltic state allowed the opening of a de facto embassy by Taiwan, a self-ruled island that China views as part of its territory»

«Some of the companies affected have asked Lithuania’s political leaders to de-escalate the dispute or risk a corporate exodus»

«Many multinationals are affected, but one of the most significant hits is to the German car sector»

«In a letter to Lithuania’s foreign and economy ministers, the German-Baltic Chamber of Commerce said imports of Chinese machinery and parts and the sale of Lithuanian products to China had ground to a halt and that some firms may have to leave»

«the basic business model of the companies is in question and some … will have no other choice than to shut down production in Lithuania»

«The overall damage to industry runs to hundreds of millions of euros, and she was told this would escalate if the dispute continues to interrupt global production»

«The focus of the dispute is the opening of a representative office by Taiwan in Vilnius, although tensions have mounted since Lithuania’s ruling coalition agreed last year to support what it described as “those fighting for freedom” on the island …. Renaming the office to remove the word Taiwan could resolve the dispute. Taiwan has other offices in Europe and the United States but they use the name of the city Taipei, avoiding reference to the island itself.» 

«But salvaging relations will be difficult.»

«The Lithuanian government has betrayed China’s trust, …. For China-Lithuania relations to get back on track, Lithuania must first correct its attitude and take practical actions to correct its mistakes»

«A spokesperson for the European Commission said it would resist “coercive measures”, adding: “We stand by Lithuania. Lithuanian exports are EU exports.”»

«China appeared to reject Brussels’ involvement»

«Problems between China and Lithuania should and can only be solved through bilateral channels between China and Lithuania»

«The stand-off threatens Lithuanian industry, which has built up clusters of factories making parts destined for overseas, such as furniture, clothing, car parts and lasers»

«It has rippled through global supply chains and, in the case of Continental, has had knock-on effects on customers such as luxury carmaker BMW and Volkswagen»

«Lithuania has become a no-go zone in China»

«European companies cannot register it as a country of origin for products they are selling here. It’s been taken off the map»

«If a Lithuanian company needs Chinese components for its production but cannot find them because China is blocking»

* * * * * * *

Questo è un altro segno di quanto siano mutati i tempi.

La Cina è in grado di imporre sanzioni efficaci al sistema produttivo occidentale, che non può fare altro che obbedire.

Si evidenzia un severo scollamento tra la politica e la realtà economica occidentale, che hanno idee ed obiettivi divergenti, se non opposti.

Nessuna realtà economica occidentale intende rinunciare al commercio ed alla produzione in Cina, il più grande mercato mondiale, per assecondare direttive politiche occidentali.

* * * * * * *


Analysis: German big business piles pressure on Lithuania in China row.

–  says Lithuania betrayed its trust on Taiwan

– Multinationals dragged into dispute by Lithuania blockade

– Companies urge Lithuania to back down – sources

* * * * * * *

Vilnius/Frankfurt, Jan 21 (Reuters) – Lithuania is under pressure from German companies to back down in a dispute with China to end a blockade of the Baltic state, as European trade officials struggle to defuse the row, people familiar with the matter said.

China has pressed multinationals to sever ties with Lithuania or face exclusion from its market, an unusually harsh move that has dragged companies into a political dispute and placed Beijing on a collision course with the European Union.  

The row erupted after the Baltic state allowed the opening of a de facto embassy by Taiwan, a self-ruled island that China views as part of its territory.

Some of the companies affected have asked Lithuania’s political leaders to de-escalate the dispute or risk a corporate exodus, according to people involved and correspondence seen by Reuters.

Many multinationals are affected, but one of the most significant hits is to the German car sector.

In a letter to Lithuania’s foreign and economy ministers, the German-Baltic Chamber of Commerce said imports of Chinese machinery and parts and the sale of Lithuanian products to China had ground to a halt and that some firms may have to leave.

Urging the ministers to seek a “constructive solution” to restore relations with China, the chamber said “the basic business model of the companies is in question and some … will have no other choice than to shut down production in Lithuania”.

Last month, Lithuania’s Prime Minister Ingrida Simonyte met with business leaders, including executives from German car-parts giant Continental, to listen to their concerns, said one person who attended.

The overall damage to industry runs to hundreds of millions of euros, and she was told this would escalate if the dispute continues to interrupt global production, the person said.

This week, Lithuanian President Gitanas Nauseda also held talks with business executives when he was urged to make an “immediate de-escalation,” according to one person with knowledge of that discussion.

The European Union’s top trade official, Valdis Dombrovskis, is also attempting to mediate between Beijing and Vilnius, ahead of a possible EU-China summit meeting in the coming months, said a person with knowledge of the matter. Lithuania belongs to the 27-state bloc.

                         RENAMING

The focus of the dispute is the opening of a representative office by Taiwan in Vilnius, although tensions have mounted since Lithuania’s ruling coalition agreed last year to support what it described as “those fighting for freedom” on the island.

Renaming the office to remove the word Taiwan could resolve the dispute. Taiwan has other offices in Europe and the United States but they use the name of the city Taipei, avoiding reference to the island itself.  

But salvaging relations will be difficult.

“The Lithuanian government has betrayed China’s trust,” the Chinese foreign ministry told Reuters in a statement.

“For China-Lithuania relations to get back on track, Lithuania must first correct its attitude and take practical actions to correct its mistakes,” said the ministry, denying that China was exerting economic pressure.

A spokesperson for the European Commission said it would resist “coercive measures”, adding: “We stand by Lithuania. Lithuanian exports are EU exports.”

The Commission said it was reaching out to China to resolve the situation and “collecting facts and evidence” to see if China was complying with international trade rules. “We will not hesitate to act to defend our rights,” said the spokesperson.

So far, there is no sign of a climbdown by Lithuania, with its president telling the business meeting this week that it was up to Brussels, home of the European Commission, to find a solution.

While one Lithuanian official, asking not to be named, said Brussels’ involvement as a go-between was critical, another said EU backing was half-hearted and that its officials too urged Lithuania to compromise.

                         ‘NO-GO ZONE’

China appeared to reject Brussels’ involvement.

“Problems between China and Lithuania should and can only be solved through bilateral channels between China and Lithuania,” said China’s foreign ministry. “Linking China-Lithuania issues to China-EU relations is … unlikely to solve the problem.”

The stand-off threatens Lithuanian industry, which has built up clusters of factories making parts destined for overseas, such as furniture, clothing, car parts and lasers. Hundreds of containers of goods and parts are in limbo.

It has rippled through global supply chains and, in the case of Continental, has had knock-on effects on customers such as luxury carmaker BMW and Volkswagen, two of the people said.

Volkswagen said its production is not affected, while BMW and Continental declined to comment.

“Lithuania has become a no-go zone in China,” said Joerg Wuttke, president of the EU Chamber of Commerce in China.

“European companies cannot register it as a country of origin for products they are selling here. It’s been taken off the map.”

France’s trade minister Franck Riester promised to help Lithuania.

“If a Lithuanian company needs Chinese components for its production but cannot find them because China is blocking … we will be happy to help by putting it in contact with French companies or companies from other Member States,” he said.

Paris, which holds the EU presidency in the coming months, is attempting to speed up introduction of new EU trade defence measures, said French officials.

The measures could penalise China in such disputes, although it is unclear whether Europe, where countries such as Germany depend on it for trade, will agree to them.

Similarly, it has been difficult for Brussels to launch legal action against China because companies affected are unwilling to be publicly named, one person with knowledge of the matter said.

Pubblicato in: Cina, Devoluzione socialismo, Economia e Produzione Industriale

Cina. Di fronte alle sanzioni Intel elimina i riferimenti allo Xinjiang.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-01-15.

1483-1520__Raffaello__La_Scuola_di_Atene_Il Pensatore_

«U.S. chipmaker Intel has deleted references to Xinjiang from an annual letter to suppliers after the company faced a backlash in China for asking suppliers to avoid the sanctions-hit region»

«Last month, Intel was slammed on Chinese social media for a letter to suppliers published on its website»

«The Dec. 23 letter said Intel had been “required to ensure that its supply chain does not use any labour or source goods or services from the Xinjiang region” following restrictions imposed by “multiple governments”»

«The letter now reads that the company prohibits “any human trafficked or involuntary labour such as forced, debt bonded, prison, indentured, or slave labour throughout your extended supply chains.”»

«It apologised last month for the “trouble” it had caused, saying that its commitment to avoid supply chains from Xinjiang was an expression of compliance with U.S. law, rather than a statement of its position on the issue»

«Multinational companies have come under pressure as they aim to comply with Xinjiang-related trade sanctions while continuing to operate in China, one of their biggest markets»

«Intel’s deletion of any reference to Xinjiang in its annual letter to suppliers, which was first reported by the Wall Street Journal, was criticised by U.S. Senator Marco Rubio»

* * * * * * *

Cina. Saranno bandite ditte ed istituzioni implicate nelle sanzioni occidentali.

Cina. Impone nuove sanzioni a personaggi americani e canadesi.

Cina. Impone sanzioni su personalità ed istituzioni del Regno Unito.

Cina. Non solo sanzioni. Ancor peggio è il boicottaggio popolare.

Cina. Inizia il boicottaggio delle imprese occidentali. Versace, Zara & Co.

La Cina boicotta Dolce & Gabbana: “hanno offeso la madrepatria”

Sanzioni. Attenti, che la Cina le fa per davvero.

Cina. Le severe sanzioni all’Australia sono un drastico monito per tutto il mondo.

Cina mette dazi severi sull’orzo australiano. Relazioni deteriorate.

Cina. Adesso è lei ad imporre le sanzioni. Il caso della Australia.

Cina. Diffida la Walmart Inc che boicotta i prodotti dello Xinjiang.

Lituania. Cina bandisce le società che hanno rapporti con la Lituania. Vilnius ed EU sulla brace.

Lituania. Blinken e Simonyte e le sanzione imposte dalla Cina. Lituania sulla brace.

Lituania. Cina bandisce le società che hanno rapporti con la Lituania. Vilnius ed EU sulla brace.

* * * * * * *

E così, anche il colosso Intel ha preferito eliminare tutti i riferimenti allo Xinjiang che le erano stati imposti in America, optando per rimanere sul mercato cinese.

Il bando dalla operatività sul suolo cinese convince qualsiasi multinazionale.

Tutti questi sono semplici esempi di chi oramai detenga il potere di far valere le proprie ragioni.

* * * * * * *


Intel deletes reference to Xinjiang after backlash in China.

Beijing, Jan 11 (Reuters) – U.S. chipmaker Intel has deleted references to Xinjiang from an annual letter to suppliers after the company faced a backlash in China for asking suppliers to avoid the sanctions-hit region.

Last month, Intel was slammed on Chinese social media for a letter to suppliers published on its website. The Dec. 23 letter said Intel had been “required to ensure that its supply chain does not use any labour or source goods or services from the Xinjiang region” following restrictions imposed by “multiple governments”.

This paragraph, or any reference to Xinjiang or China, was no longer in the letter, according to a Reuters review of the same page on Tuesday. The letter now reads that the company prohibits “any human trafficked or involuntary labour such as forced, debt bonded, prison, indentured, or slave labour throughout your extended supply chains.”

Intel did not immediately respond to a request for comment. It apologised last month for the “trouble” it had caused, saying that its commitment to avoid supply chains from Xinjiang was an expression of compliance with U.S. law, rather than a statement of its position on the issue.

Multinational companies have come under pressure as they aim to comply with Xinjiang-related trade sanctions while continuing to operate in China, one of their biggest markets.

The United States has accused China of widespread human rights abuses in Xinjiang, home to the country’s predominantly Muslim Uyghurs, including forced labour. Beijing has repeatedly denied the claims.

Intel’s deletion of any reference to Xinjiang in its annual letter to suppliers, which was first reported by the Wall Street Journal, was criticised by U.S. Senator Marco Rubio.

“Intel’s cowardice is yet another predictable consequence of economic reliance on China,” Rubio said in a statement on Monday.

“Instead of humiliating apologies and self-censorship, companies should move their supply chains to countries that do not use slave labour or commit genocide.”

Rubio was one of four U.S. politicians who introduced the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act last month calling for a ban on imports from Xinjiang over allegations of forced labour there. On Dec. 23, U.S. President Joe Biden signed the act into law.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Cina, Devoluzione socialismo, India, Regno Unito, Russia, Stati Uniti

Mondo. Proiezioni delle nazioni al 2050. Il trionfo dell’oriente. – Bloomberg.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-01-04.

2022-01-01__ Proiezini GDP PPP al 2050 001

Pwc ha reso disponibile il report The World in 20250.

È un testo particolarmente lungo, per cui ne forniremo solo alcuni abstract.

* * * * * * *

«In our latest World in 2050 report we present economic growth projections for 32 of the largest economies in the world, accounting for around 84% of global GDP »

«But we expect a slowdown in global growth after 2020, as the rate of expansion in China and some other major emerging economies moderates to a more sustainable long-term rate, and as working age population growth slows in many large economies»

«China has already overtaken the US in 2014 to become the largest economy in purchasing power parity (PPP2) terms»

«In market exchange rate (MER) terms, we project China to overtake the US in 2028 despite its projected growth slowdown»

«The US could be down to third place in the global GDP rankings while the EU27’s share of world GDP could fall below 10% by 2050»

«We project new emerging economies like Mexico and Indonesia to be larger than the UK and France by 2030 (in PPP terms) while Turkey could become larger than Italy. Nigeria and Vietnam could be the fast growing large economies over the period to 2050»

«These are based on a model that takes account of projected trends in demographics, capital investment, education levels and technological progress»

«India’s share of world GDP in PPP terms could increase steadily from just under 7% in 2014 to around 13.5% in 2050»

«Our model projects that Indonesia (9th in 2014) and Brazil (7th in 2014) could rise to amongst the top 5 largest economies by 2050 in terms of GDP at PPPs»

Nota. La proiezione della EU27 deriva da un conto aggiornato.

* * * * * * *

Questa Tabella conferma sostanzialmente le precedenti.

Entro il 2050, ossia tra trenta anni, il blocco asiatico avrà a livello mondiale il predominio economico indiscusso.

Ciò che Bloomberg denomina ‘Free Economies’ altro non sarebbe che l’enclave liberal socialista occidentale, sempre poi che a tale data esista ancora. A tale data il suo spopolamento degli autoctoni sarà altamente drammatico.

L’occidente è destinato a scomparire, non tanto per la aggressività dei cinesi quanto piuttosto per la sua ideologia suicida.

Ci si metta quindi l’anima in pace. Quello delineato sarà il mondo i cui vivranno i nostri figli e nipoti.

* * * * * * *


Only 26% of World GDP to Come From Free Economies in 2050. – Bloomberg

«                       Highlights

In our latest World in 2050 report we present economic growth projections for 32 of the largest economies in the world, accounting for around 84% of global GDP.

We project the world economy to grow at an average of just over 3% per annum in the period 2014 – 50, doubling in size by 2037 and nearly tripling by 2050.

But we expect a slowdown in global growth after 2020, as the rate of expansion in China and some other major emerging economies moderates to a more sustainable long-term rate, and as working age population growth slows in many large economies.

The global economic power shift1 away from the established advanced economies in North America, Western Europe and Japan will continue over the next 35 years. China has already overtaken the US in 2014 to become the largest economy in purchasing power parity (PPP2) terms. In market exchange rate (MER) terms, we project China to overtake the US in 2028 despite its projected growth slowdown.

India has the potential to become the second largest economy in the world by 2050 in PPP terms (third in MER terms), although this requires a sustained programme of structural reforms3.

We project new emerging economies like Mexico and Indonesia to be larger than the UK and France by 2030 (in PPP terms) while Turkey could become larger than Italy. Nigeria and Vietnam could be the fast growing large economies over the period to 2050.

Colombia, Poland and Malaysia all possess great potential for sustainable long-term growth in the coming decades according to our country experts.

At the same time, recent experience has re-emphasised that relatively rapid growth is not guaranteed for emerging economies, as indicated by recent problems in Russia and Brazil, for example. It requires sustained and effective investment in infrastructure and improving political, economic, legal and social institutions. It also requires remaining open to the free flow of technology, ideas and talented people that are key drivers of economic catch-up growth.

We think that overdependence on natural resources could also impede long term growth in some countries (e.g. Russia, Nigeria and Saudi Arabia) unless they can diversify their economies.

                         Key findings: GDP projections to 2050

This report updates our long-term global economic growth projections4, which were last published in January 2013. These are based on a model that takes account of projected trends in demographics, capital investment, education levels and technological progress. We have updated both the base year data (from 2011 to 2014) and future assumptions on the key drivers of growth, as well as expanding the coverage of the model from 24 to 32 countries (now accounting for around 84% of total world GDP at PPP exchange rates).

The changing league table of world GDP in PPP terms is shown in Table 1. China is already the world’s biggest economy in PPP terms, and we project that India could have the potential to just overtake the US as the world’s second largest economy by 2050 in PPP terms (although the projected difference is small relative to the margin of uncertainty around any such projections).

We project that the gap between the three biggest economies (i.e. China, India and the US) and the rest of the world will widen over the next few decades. In 2014, the third biggest economy in PPP terms (India) is around 50% larger than the fourth biggest economy (Japan). In 2050, the third biggest economy in PPP terms (the US) is projected to be approximately 240% larger than the fourth biggest economy (Indonesia).

The rise of Indonesia and Nigeria through the world rankings throughout the period to 2050 is very striking: Indonesia rises from 9th in 2014 to 4th in 2050, and Nigeria rises from 20th in 2014 to 9th in 2050.

However, average income per capita (i.e. GDP per capita) will still be significantly higher in the advanced economies than the emerging economies in 2050. The current gap in income per capita between developing and developed countries is just too large to bridge fully over this period.»

Pubblicato in: Cina, Devoluzione socialismo, Economia e Produzione Industriale, Materie Prime, Problemia Energetici

Cina. Entrata in funzione la mega Centrale Elettrica a carbone di Shanghaimiao.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-01-12.

Cina Shanghaimiao 001

Questo è il mesto commento di Reuters.

China fires up giant coal power plant in face of calls for cuts.

«China, under fire for approving new coal power stations as other countries try to curb greenhouse gases, has completed the first 1,000-megawatt unit of the Shanghaimiao plant, the biggest of its kind under construction in the country. ….

China is responsible for more than half of global coal-fired power generation and is expected to see a 9% year-on-year increase in 2021 ….

the country is likely to build as much as 150 gigawatts (GW) of new coal-fired power capacity over the 2021-2025 period, bringing the total to 1,230 GW.»

* * * * * * *

«As the world seeks to phase down use of coal, China’s biggest coal-fired power plant has just finished construction and entered operation on Dec. 28»

«The Shanghaimiao plant, located in the country’s top coal-producing region of Inner Mongolia, said on Tuesday that its first of four 1,000-megawatt units was online after passing a 168 hour period of trials»

«The plant will supply power to China’s eastern coastal Shandong Province»

«China’s power generation accounts for one-third of global coal consumption, and the country’s dependence is anticipated to grow by nine percent in 2021»

«the country is likely to build as much as 150 gigawatts (GW) of new coal-fired power capacity over the 2021-2025 period, bringing its total to 1,230 GW ahead of its 2025 deadline»

* * * * * * *

La Cina prosegue imperterrita a costruire centrale elettriche alimentate a carbone.

I media liberal ortodossi usano parole vive solo nella loro ente ideologizzata.

«China, under fire for approving new coal power stations»

Sinceramente, né noi né i cinesi ci si era accorti che la Cina fosse “sotto tiro“.

«As the world seeks to phase down use of coal»

Nella loro congenita e umile modestia, i liber occidentali considerano sé stessi essere e rappresentare “the world”.

Nei fatti, al contrario, il resto del mondo civile li ignora, tanto sono politicamente ed economicamente ininfluenti.

Non sono a quanto pare bastate le dure lezioni del G20 e di Cop26.

* * * * * * *


China Fires Up New Giant Coal Power Plant in Face of Calls for Cuts.

As the world seeks to phase down use of coal, China’s biggest coal-fired power plant has just finished construction and entered operation on Dec. 28.

The Shanghaimiao plant, located in the country’s top coal-producing region of Inner Mongolia, said on Tuesday that its first of four 1,000-megawatt units was online after passing a 168 hour period of trials.

The plant will supply power to China’s eastern coastal Shandong Province.

The thermal power plant is operated by the Guodian Power Shanghaimiao Corporation, a subsidiary of the centrally-owned China Energy Investment Corporation.

China, where coal-fired plants generate more than two-thirds of its electricity, pledged to reduce its reliance on coal as part of global efforts to tackle climate change, but to do so only after 2025.

The power crunch engulfing the country this year has disrupted the daily lives of tens of millions of people, crippled industrial output, and wreaked havoc on global supply chains.As a result, the authorities ordered the mining and burning of more coal to stave off a prolonged energy crisis over the winter.

China’s power generation accounts for one-third of global coal consumption, and the country’s dependence is anticipated to grow by nine percent in 2021, the International Energy Agency said in a report published this month.

China’s State Grid Corporation said in a December report that energy security concerns mean the country is likely to build as much as 150 gigawatts (GW) of new coal-fired power capacity over the 2021-2025 period, bringing its total to 1,230 GW ahead of its 2025 deadline.

Pubblicato in: Cina, Commercio

Cina. Diffida la Walmart Inc che boicotta i prodotti dello Xinjiang.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-01-05.

Cina Usa 001

«From our humble beginnings as a small discount retailer in Rogers, Ark., Walmart has opened thousands of stores in the U.S. and expanded internationally. Through innovation, we’re creating a seamless experience to let customers shop anytime and anywhere online and in stores. We are creating opportunities and bringing value to customers and communities around the globe. Walmart operates approximately 10,500 stores and clubs under 48 banners in 24 countries and eCommerce websites. We employ 2.2 million associates around the world — nearly 1.6 million in the U.S. alone. ….

Walmart has been at the forefront of retail modernization in China since 1996, when we opened a hypermarket and Sam’s Club in Shenzhen. We now serve communities nationwide as a leader in omnichannel retail. We delight customers through nearly 400 stores and clubs as well as multiple e-commerce platforms. Walmart China focuses on nurturing local talent and diversity. Chinese associates make up 99.9% of the total workforce. All stores and clubs are managed by local talents. Women make up more than half of the management at all levels. ….

Revenue: 559.2 billion USD (2021)» [Walmart]

* * * * * * *

China graft agency warns Walmart and Sam’s Club over Xinjiang products.

«Last week, Sam’s Club came under fire in China after users  of the Weibo social media platform shared screenshots allegedly showing that products from the far-western Chinese region of Xinjiang had been removed from the store’s online  app»

* * * * * * *

«China’s anti-graft agency on Friday accused U.S. retail giant Walmart Inc and its Sam’s Club chain of “stupidity and shorted-sightedness” after Chinese news outlets reported Sam’s Club had removed Xinjiang-sourced products from stores»

«Last week, Sam’s Club came under fire in China after several news outlets shared videos and screenshots on the Weibo social media platform that they said showed products from the far-western Chinese region of Xinjiang had been removed from the store’s online app»

«The social media row erupted after U.S. President Joe Biden signed into law on Dec. 23 legislation banning imports from Xinjiang over concern about forced labour there»

«China rejects accusations of forced labour or any other abuses in Xinjiang»

«Neither Walmart nor Sam’s Club has made public statements on the backlash against them in China, and Walmart did not respond to a request for comment on Friday»

«China is a huge market for Walmart, which generated revenue of $11.43 billion in the country during its fiscal year that ended Jan. 31. Of 423 retail units Walmart operates in China, 36 are Sam’s Club stores»

* * * * * * *

Lituania. Blinken e Simonyte e le sanzione imposte dalla Cina. Lituania sulla brace.

China’s European Diplomacy

Women make up 60% of White House staff, diversity total at 44%

Usa. Biden. La Cnn accusa l’Amministrazione delle femmine di mancanza di ‘competenza’.

Lituania. Cina bandisce le società che hanno rapporti con la Lituania. Vilnius ed EU sulla brace.

* * * * * * *

Vedremo come potranno evolvere le cose. Una cosa parrebbe essere certa.

Quanti non cessassero gli attacchi alla Cina sarebbero estromessi da quel mercato.

Adesso è la Cina che può imporre e far rispettare le proprie sanzioni, possibilità di azione oramai persa dell’occidente liberal.

* * * * * * *


China warns Walmart and Sam’s Club over Xinjiang products

Beijing, Dec 31 (Reuters) – China’s anti-graft agency on Friday accused U.S. retail giant Walmart Inc and its Sam’s Club chain of “stupidity and shorted-sightedness” after Chinese news outlets reported Sam’s Club had removed Xinjiang-sourced products from stores.

Last week, Sam’s Club came under fire in China after several news outlets shared videos and screenshots on the Weibo social media platform that they said showed products from the far-western Chinese region of Xinjiang had been removed from the store’s online app.

The social media row erupted after U.S. President Joe Biden signed into law on Dec. 23 legislation banning imports from Xinjiang over concern about forced labour there.

 Walmart is the latest foreign firm to be tripped up by Western pressure over Beijing’s treatment of Uyghurs and other minority Muslims in Xinjiang and China’s importance as a market and supply base.

China rejects accusations of forced labour or any other abuses in Xinjiang.

Neither Walmart nor Sam’s Club has made public statements on the backlash against them in China, and Walmart did not respond to a request for comment on Friday.

The ruling Communist Party’s Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI) accused Sam’s Club of boycotting Xinjiang products and trying to “muddle through” the controversy by remaining silent.

“To take down all products from a region without a valid reason hides an ulterior motive, reveals stupidity and short-sightedness, and will surely have its own bad consequences,” it said on its website.

China is a huge market for Walmart, which generated revenue of $11.43 billion in the country during its fiscal year that ended Jan. 31. Of 423 retail units Walmart operates in China, 36 are Sam’s Club stores, according to its website.

A search for popular Xinjiang goods like raisins on the Sam’s Club China store app did not yield any relevant results, but neither did searches for products from other places, such as Fujian tea, according to a Reuters review on Wednesday.

Pubblicato in: Cina, Devoluzione socialismo, Finanza e Sistema Bancario, Stati Uniti

Inflazione e mercato cinese. Due fenomeni destinati a perdurare. – Bloomberg.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-01-02.

Cigno Nero con Pulcino 001

Lo scorso anno 2021 ha portato due scomode sorprese: l’inflazione e la crisi del mercato cinese.

* * * * * * *

«Inflation and China failed to rattle markets. 2022 might be different»

«A year ago, most economists expected that the Covid-19 pandemic would continue to weigh heavily on the global marketplace, and that the recovery process would be far from smooth»

«But two changes to the landscape — rapid inflation, and questions about the viability of investing in China — caught nearly everyone off-guard»

«And we probably wouldn’t have guessed that markets would by and large take the news in stride»

«I know of no forecaster who came close to projecting a nearly 7% U.S. inflation rate for the end of this year»

«Today, unusually high and persistent inflation has become the consensus call»

«The surge in inflation is even more striking given that, unlike what textbooks and prior experience would suggest, its impact on markets has been muted»

«Yields on government bonds, for example, have been relatively subdued, with 10-year U.S. Treasury notes still trading around 1.50%»

«What makes this even more interesting is that it comes with significant political and institutional stakes»

«From the ability of Democrats to retain control of Congress to the damaged credibility of the Federal Reserve, the 2021 inflation surprise will reverberate throughout 2022»

«Yet to the surprise of many, emerging market equities have underperformed once again»

«Even more unexpectedly, Chinese stocks have been hit hard this year»

«At the most basic level, it isn’t yet clear whether more intervention by Beijing is in the cards or whether the recent default by real estate developer Evergrande will open the way for profitable investing, much as the Russian government’s seizure of oil giant Yukos nearly two decades ago ultimately marked a turning point for investors in that country»

«Amplifying the surprise around China’s investment climate is the lack of any meaningful spread to other emerging markets»

«What occurred in China has remained in China; and what occurred there was far from the “Lehman moment” that some predicted at midyear»

«The evolution of inflation and China’s investability constituted big surprises in 2021, as did their lack of spillover into other areas»

* * * * * * *

Questo tema affrontato da Bloomberg è di notevole interesse culturale e pratico: si è in presenza di due fenomeni inattesi quanto importanti, non affrontabili con i passati schemi mentali.

Tra le molte ed importanti considerazioni una sembrerebbe essere di maggiore interesse generale.

Le borse valori, che erano nate come luogo di incontro tra capitale in cerca di investimenti ed attività produttive in cerca di capitali, hanno perso gran parte della loro funzione originaria. Il valore delle quotazioni azionarie non è più correlato allo stato di salute economica delle società: in passato queste salivano al salire della produttività, adesso invece sotto la azione della speculazione.

Un gruppetto di old friends uniti come ‘latrones scelerum foedere inter se‘ fa artatamente salire le quotazioni: raggiunto un massimo locale vende repentinamente per poi ricomprare a più basse quotazioni. Il tutto con i denari generosamente messi a disposizione delle banche centrali.

Impossibile prevedere quanto a lungo questo sistema possa campare, ma su questa terra nulla è eterno.

* * * * * * *


Inflation and China Failed to Rattle Markets. 2022 Might Be Different.

A year ago, most economists expected that the Covid-19 pandemic would continue to weigh heavily on the global marketplace, and that the recovery process would be far from smooth. But two changes to the landscape — rapid inflation, and questions about the viability of investing in China — caught nearly everyone off-guard.

Even if we had foreseen these developments, it is unlikely that we would have gotten right their broader implications. And we probably wouldn’t have guessed that markets would by and large take the news in stride. That bears remembering as we attempt to make projections for the coming year while still dogged by the pandemic and other uncertainties. 

The Inflation Surprise

I know of no forecaster who came close to projecting a nearly 7% U.S. inflation rate for the end of this year, and that includes those of us who pushed back as early as six months ago against the notion that this bout of inflation would prove to be transitory during 2021.

Today, unusually high and persistent inflation has become the consensus call. Yet even now, there is an under-appreciation of the current inflation dynamics, including supply-chain disruptions and worker shortages associated with the new Covid variant, omicron.

The surge in inflation is even more striking given that, unlike what textbooks and prior experience would suggest, its impact on markets has been muted.

Yields on government bonds, for example, have been relatively subdued, with 10-year U.S. Treasury notes still trading around 1.50%. Indeed, if anything, yields adjusted for inflation have fallen deeper into negative territory. Meanwhile, stocks have gone from one record high to another, reaching a total of 70 for the S&P 500 Index this year.

This makes the new year an uncertain proposition for the economy, for markets and for public policy. 

Will inflation derail economic growth while also worsening inequality? How long will it take for the Federal Reserve to catch up to inflation realities, and which policy measures will it deploy?

How quickly will a tightening of market financial conditions follow the pivot to fewer stimulus policies from central banks? How big will the economic and financial impact be, in the U.S. and across the world?

Will yields rise as bond investors look to limit the erosion in the real value of their investment? If so, how will stocks react?

Which countries and sectors are particularly sensitive to higher market volatility?

What makes this even more interesting is that it comes with significant political and institutional stakes. From the ability of Democrats to retain control of Congress to the damaged credibility of the Federal Reserve, the 2021 inflation surprise will reverberate throughout 2022.

The China Investability Surprise

A year ago, many (not me) were advocating that investors make a significant portfolio shift from the U.S. to emerging markets, with a heavy emphasis on China. After all, foreign stocks had again lagged behind their U.S. counterparts, adding to the apparent relative valuation advantage with which they had started the year. Meanwhile, China’s attractiveness to investors had increased. The country’s economy became the first to recover from the pandemic, adding to the promise of a continuation of an impressive multi-decade rise.

Yet to the surprise of many, emerging market equities have underperformed once again. Even more unexpectedly, Chinese stocks have been hit hard this year as, in a move that surprised many investors, the government began reining in private enterprise in tech, real estate and other  industries.

As Beijing tightened its grip, conventional assessments of economic and business fundamentals had to take a back seat to political debates about the intensity of the Chinese government’s crackdown in the name of “common prosperity.”

This is taking place even as China’s zero-Covid policy is challenged by rising infection numbers. The inclination toward a different treatment of domestic and foreign investors further complicates the investment outlook for the world’s second most powerful economy. 

At the most basic level, it isn’t yet clear whether more intervention by Beijing is in the cards or whether the recent default by real estate developer Evergrande will open the way for profitable investing, much as the Russian government’s seizure of oil giant Yukos nearly two decades ago ultimately marked a turning point for investors in that country.

Amplifying the surprise around China’s investment climate is the lack of any meaningful spread to other emerging markets. What occurred in China has remained in China; and what occurred there was far from the “Lehman moment” that some predicted at midyear.

It is particularly noteworthy that, at least so far, there has been no significant retreat of foreign capital from emerging markets as a whole. Instead, large investors have remained exposed to emerging markets, pushed there in search of higher returns by the low yields and high equity valuations in their home markets in advanced countries.

The evolution of inflation and China’s investability constituted big surprises in 2021, as did their lack of spillover into other areas. It remains to be seen how benign last year’s surprises will stay for the global economy and markets.

Pubblicato in: Cina, Persona Umana, Scienza & Tecnica, Stati Uniti

Persone di Talento. È in corso una competizione mondiale per reclutarli.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-01-02.

2021-12-30__ Talento 001

«I greci ci criticano perché siamo così severi con i nostri figli e così lassi con gli schiavi: non hanno capito che i nostri figli dovranno dominare il mondo»

«When a true genius appears in the world you may know him by this sign; that the dunces are all in confederacy against him»

Il vero tesoro di una nazione è costituito dai suoi uomini di talento. Dopo la fine della guerra mondiale Germania, Giappone ed Italia erano distrutte, prive di risorse, ma avevano conservato con cura le loro persone di talento. Quindici anni dopo si assistette al loro ‘miracolo economico’.

Un Newton oppure una Md Curie fanno una nazione. Un milione di mediocri non fa un genio.

Il problema è identificarli, lasciarli crescere e, sopratutto, non ostacolarli.

* * * * * * *

«Is the U.S. Losing the War for Global Talent?»

«International students, particularly those coming from societies and cultures dramatically different from the US, are still not fully prepared for the vastly different academic culture»

«Students are quite different in how they’re approaching the idea of a foreign credential»

«Should I go to the U.S.? Is that the best return on investment for my family’s money? Or am I going to go to the U.K. or some other country?»

«Until about a decade ago, international students in the U.S. were dominated by those coming to the U.S. to pursue a master’s or Ph.D.»

«Then, with the huge growth in the Chinese middle class, there was this big influx of young Chinese students at the undergraduate level»

«foreign undergraduates, for the most part, have been full-fee paying students»

«Many families are now rethinking whether they have the resources to pay for their children’s education abroad»

«→→ What is it that Americans don’t understand about the experiences of international students? ←←»

«People don’t often appreciate how important international students have been to the post-1960s history of success of the U.S., from technology to academia to medicine»

«in the U.S., we do not want to have a candid conversation about the pathway from higher education to skilled talent and how countries grow their talent pool»

«If we look at the statistics, 70 to 80 percent of international students continue to stay on in the U.S. after their studies»

«More generally, we need to smooth that pathway from being a student to joining the workforce»

«When you’re an international student, everything you do in your program of study is governed by immigration rules»

«The policies in Canada are much friendlier to international students because of that clear understanding that education is a pathway to careers and the workforce»

* * * * * * *

Cina. Di gran lunga i migliori studenti al mondo.

Italia. Un addetto alla scuola ogni 5.57 studenti, sei volte più che in Cina.

Scuola Italiana. Fotocopie di una burocrazia satanica.

Invalsi 2019, l’Italia divisa in due. Quasi la metà dei maturandi «analfabeta» in matematica

Nuova Zelanda. Cresce il numero di studenti con proficiency in Cinese.

Cina. I grandi Atenei inglesi stanno trasferendosi in Cina.

Coronavirus e Cina mettono in dissesto le Università inglesi.

Conoscere e capire la Cina. Test di ammissione in seconda elementare.

* * * * * * *

Università. Rank mondiale. Irrompono le cinesi e declinano le liberal.

«Irrompono a viva forza le università cinesi nelle top 100.

Peking University, 27°, richiama il 16% di studenti stranieri;

Tsinghua University, 30°, richiama il 9% di studenti stranieri;

University of Hong Kong, 40°, richiama il 42% di studenti stranieri;

Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, 44°, richiama il 31% di studenti stranieri;

Chinese University of Hong Kong, 58°, richiama il 31% di studenti stranieri

* * * * * * *

I dati dei Rank mondiali sono inequivocabili.

Le università cinesi attirano gli studenti molto di più di quelle americane, che una volta erano posto mitico ed ambito ove andare a studiare.

Non è tempo e luogo per una analisi approfondita, ma almeno un elemento salta immediatamente agli occhi.

«in the U.S., we do not want to have a candid conversation».

«Stati Uniti d’America dove un professore viene licenziato per aver detto che “L’uragano Harvey è la risposta del karma al voto repubblicano del Texas”. Il tutto è avvenuto all’Università di Tampa, il nome del professore di sociologia è quello di Kenneth L. Storey»

Privare l’università della possibilità di esprimere liberamente le proprie opinioni la denatura e la rende solo strumento di azione politica, ossia tutto tranne che ‘università’: logico quindi che gli studenti esteri le evitino.

* * * * * * *


Is the U.S. Losing the War for Global Talent?

International students, particularly those coming from societies and cultures dramatically different from the US, are still not fully prepared for the vastly different academic culture.

* * *

This is one of a series of interviews by Bloomberg Opinion columnists on how to solve the world’s most pressing policy challenges. It has been edited for length and clarity.

Virginia Postrel: You came to the U.S. as a graduate student in psychology in 1992 and worked for many years at the Institute of International Education, as well as other jobs in international education. Your new book, “America Calling,” is a memoir of your own experiences and a report on the general state of foreign students in the U.S. How is the experience of current students different today from when you came? 

Rajika Bhandari, author, “America Calling: A Foreign Student in a Country of Possibility”: Students are quite different in how they’re approaching the idea of a foreign credential. They’re seeing it from the perspective of a very savvy consumer. Should I go to the U.S.? Is that the best return on investment for my family’s money? Or am I going to go to the U.K. or some other country? Students are armed with information in a way that they never were before.

However, there’s a lot that hasn’t changed. First and foremost are the enduring challenges around immigration, which rule the existence of an international student’s life in the U.S. in a way that most people who don’t have to experience it will never fully understand.

The other piece that remains the same is that international students, particularly those coming from societies and cultures dramatically different from the U.S., are still not fully prepared for the vastly different academic culture: the idea of a college classroom as a very open, democratic environment; the idea of really being independent in your learning; the idea that you can and should question your professor because you will actually be assessed on how well you’re able to articulate your ideas and to think critically. That can really be a shock for many students coming from highly traditional Asian cultures, where there are strict hierarchies in the classroom — and God forbid you ever question the professor.

VP: What is the current breakdown between graduate and undergraduate international students?

RB: Until about a decade ago, international students in the U.S. were dominated by those coming to the U.S. to pursue a master’s or Ph.D. Then, with the huge growth in the Chinese middle class, there was this big influx of young Chinese students at the undergraduate level. Over the past few years, we’ve seen more undergraduates coming to the U.S. However, according to some of the statistics for this year, it seems like that gap may be narrowing once again.

One reason is that foreign undergraduates, for the most part, have been full-fee paying students. They’re the ones who really fund the bottom line of U.S. institutions. Yet those are also the ones whose families have really been economically impacted by the pandemic. In many countries, the middle class itself has shrunk. Many families are now rethinking whether they have the resources to pay for their children’s education abroad.

VP: What is it that Americans don’t understand about the experiences of international students?

RB: People don’t often appreciate how important international students have been to the post-1960s history of success of the U.S., from technology to academia to medicine. One of the co-founders of Moderna was an international student. The new CEO of Twitter was an international student. Many Americans know that these individuals are immigrants, but what that journey has been — and why education has been a really critical aspect to that journey — is not well understood.

VP:  There’s a kind of pantomime, enacted by everyone involved, which holds that students come to the U.S. to study and then go back to their home countries. That’s what the student visas are based on. When you came, that was your intention as well. In what ways is that model not realistic?

RB: That question really gets at the heart of why I wrote this book. I felt a growing sense of frustration that in the U.S., we do not want to have a candid conversation about the pathway from higher education to skilled talent and how countries grow their talent pool.

In almost every developed country—look at the U.K. Australia, New Zealand, Germany, many others—the pathway from education to immigration has been omnipresent for a very long time. In the U.S., that’s not the case. If we look at the statistics, 70 to 80 percent of international students continue to stay on in the U.S. after their studies. Yet the flow of international students is still viewed within this framework of “exchange,” this pantomime, as you said earlier, of bilateral exchange. But it’s not an exchange. Many more students are coming than going. The number who come on exchange programs, like the flagship Fulbright Program, is very, very small. Most students who are coming here are individually motivated students funding their way.

One of the biggest challenges is that the F-1 international student visa continues to remain what’s called a “single intent visa,” which means that an undergraduate student at the age of 17 has to stand before a consular affairs officer in their home country and say, “Yes, I’m fairly certain that after four years, I’m coming back.” How can you know? We don’t ask 17-year-olds in the U.S. to know exactly what they’re going to decide four years down the line. I think most students are being honest, stating what they think is the right thing for them. It was true for me. But you evolve and change.

VP: So what reforms to the system what would you propose?

RB: First, remove that single-intent requirement of the student visa. Another issue is that currently, the applied work opportunities that international students have after their studies, through the Optional Practical Training Program, are incredibly fraught. The program was not created by legislation. So it’s like a sword hanging over every international student: Will I be able to pursue this one year of work after studies or not? What’s going to happen?

More generally, we need to smooth that pathway from being a student to joining the workforce. The restrictions and backlogs right now are really significant. It’s an issue of looking at the talent that the U.S. is losing — talent that’s been trained in the U.S.

VP: How does the U.S. immigration system shape the experience of international students while they’re here? How do they have a different experience from a similarly situated American student who might be in the same program with them?

RB: There’s this crippling sense of uncertainty that governs your entire time in the U.S. There are so many immigration rules to abide by, for example, in how much coursework you need to take each semester. Most American students are free to take the semester off, particularly graduate students: “I’ll continue to enroll, but I’m going to go work for two years at the World Bank.” None of that freedom exists for international students. When you’re an international student, everything you do in your program of study is governed by immigration rules.

I say sarcastically in the book that many people have the stereotype that “Oh, international students are brilliant, they finish their doctoral degrees in just five or six years, they’re so smart.” It’s not that they’re smart. They don’t have a choice. There is no option but to keep marching along and to meet those requirements, or you immediately fall out of status and have to head back to your country.

This sense of uncertainty hovers over you as you go through that pathway. It’s an endless process of waiting and not knowing. You’re applying for your Optional Practical Training work permit, and then you’re waiting and waiting, because you don’t know when it’ll come through. Then you might apply for an H1-B work permit. And that comes with its own uncertainties. It’s really something that governs an international student’s entire existence in the way that American students don’t even have to ever think about.

VP: How does that compare to say, the experience in Canada?

RB: The policies in Canada are much friendlier to international students because of that clear understanding that education is a pathway to careers and the workforce.

VP: Many people who want to restrict but not eliminate immigration want to skew it toward highly educated individuals who bring lots of human capital. But I worry about some of the potential side effects of that model. Part of the implicit American social contract—which is not always honored—is that we respect each other as individuals, and especially in the context of work. We respect the person who’s doing a job. We don’t look down on them because it’s a lower-paid job or requires less education. The work itself is worthy of respect. Does taking in lots of privileged people from hierarchical societies like India’s risk eroding the egalitarian relationships of everyday American life? Do people who come from the elite of highly hierarchical societies bring that elite view with them and inject it into daily American life?

RB: That is a fabulous question. And I do not put myself above that. I do think that there’s something special about entering a new society as a student, because you’re like a sponge, and you’re at an age where your values and ideas and beliefs are still being shaped. And so the experience can have a profound and transformative impact on a person. And it definitely did on me.

I realize that I came in with a lot of those ideas that you just laid out, from a society that was very rigidly structured across class lines. I had my own biases and beliefs, whether it was about race and skin color, or the dignity of labor. Being in the U.S. really forced me to confront my own biases, and to evolve and change into being more open in my thinking, and hopefully being a better human being.

And so that’s one thing that I’m imparting to students these days, when they ask me, I want to come to the U.S. and study, how can I succeed? One of my challenges to them is really think about making yourself open to how a society can actually transform you.

VP: How did studying and living in the U.S. help you understand India better?

RB: When you leave your home, and you’re away for sufficient enough period of time, it really gives you that sense of objectivity and the feeling of being an outsider looking in — knowing that society really well, but still being one step removed. For me, those learnings were largely around sexism and my place in the world as a young woman: seeing my homeland and my society for what it is and realizing that that’s not what I wanted for myself, that I wanted something different.

VP:  Even though there are certainly negative experiences in the book, it did make me feel good about the country. It was a positive view of America—not a beautiful fairy tale, but if you want to come here and then you end up staying, there must be something good about the country.

RB:  I’m really happy to hear you say that. What draws people to the U.S.? I say in the book that it’s the country that gave the world Indiana Jones. I wasn’t trying to be flippant — but just to say that there’s this idea of freedom embodied in different ways: freedom of thought, the freedom to pursue one’s aspirations, freedom to reinvent yourself.

VP: You have a great example of your surprise at seeing somebody in the U.S. who had braces as an adult. You see it as a sign of reinventing yourself.

RB:  It’s that freedom, manifested in many different ways, that students also encounter as soon as they arrive here. They are pushed to think in ways they had not experienced before. And I think it’s what really draws people here. It’s still present, despite all of the challenges that the country has had over the past four or five years.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Virginia Postrel is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. She is a visiting fellow at the Smith Institute for Political Economy and Philosophy at Chapman University and the author, most recently, of “The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World.”

Pubblicato in: Armamenti, Cina

Cina. Nel 2030 disporrà di oltre mille testate atomiche. Un arsenale offensivo.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-01-01.

2021-11-15__ China’s Nuclear Development 001

«China is building new nuclear weapons much faster than previously predicted, already has a “nascent nuclear triad,” and will field more than 1,000 nuclear warheads by 2030»

«the accelerating pace of the [People’s Republic of China’s] nuclear expansion may enable [it] to have up to 700 deliverable nuclear warheads by 2027, … [and] at least 1,000 warheads by 2030, exceeding the pace and size»

«In its last report, the Pentagon said China had 200 nuclear warheads and was expected to double that number by the end of the decade»

«China is “developing a first-strike capability.”»

«China’s plan for now is to develop a “credible second-strike” capacity with nuclear weapons»

«According to a State Department disclosure in early October, the U.S. has 3,750 nuclear warheads, down from 3,805 a year earlier and 3,822 in 2018»

«The Pentagon said the People’s Liberation Army Rocket Forces are developing new intercontinental ballistic missiles that will “significantly improve” their overall force, and they will be equipped with multiple independently targeted warheads, necessitating an increase in warhead production»

«China is expanding its inventory of road-mobile DF-26 intermediate-range ballistic missiles, which can strike ground or maritime targets, and in 2020, fielded its first hypersonic weapons system, the DF-17 hypersonic glide vehicle-capable medium-range ballistic missile»

«China has also built up its H-8 bomber force, adding a “nuclear air-launched ballistic missile,” effectively establishing China’s own version of a triad, along with intercontinental ballistic missiles and submarine-launched ballistic missiles»

«China’s nuclear missile submarine fleet includes six boats, each of which can carry 12 CSS-N-14 (JL-2) sea-launched ballistic missiles»

«The H-6N can carry six land-attack cruise missiles with a range allowing it to hit targets “in the second island chain” from airfields in the mainland»

2021-11-15__ China’s Nuclear Development 002

* * * * * * * *

Armamenti Nucleari. È in atto una corsa al riarmo per la prossima guerra.

Cina. Mica solo armamenti nuovi di zecca.

Cina. Starebbe (potrebbe) trasferendo armamenti atomici nelle isole artificiali.

Cina. Gli Usa sono indifesi rispetto ai missili ipersonici suborbitali. – Generale Milley.

Cina. I lanciatori dei missili ipersonici DF-17 sono diventati stealth.

Cina. Testato un missile atomico ipersonico suborbitale. Usa colti di sorpresa.

Biden dice di essere ‘preoccupato’ dei missili ipersonici cinesi e russi. La prossima guerra.

Missili a 6 volte la velocità del suono, testati in Cina nuovi velivoli ipersonici

* * *

A quanto sarebbe dato di sapere, la Cina ha un problema di breve termine che si embrica su quello a medio-lungo termine.

L’obiettivo immediato sarebbe il poter disporre di una forza dissuasiva credibile, che possa scoraggiare un attacco esterno.

L’obiettivo di medio-lungo termine sembrerebbe consistere nel poter disporre di una credibile ed efficiente forza nucleare di attacco.

* * * * * * * *


China’s Nuclear Development Outstrips Predictions; 1,000 Warheads by 2030.

China is building new nuclear weapons much faster than previously predicted, already has a “nascent nuclear triad,” and will field more than 1,000 nuclear warheads by 2030, according to the Pentagon’s 2021 report on China’s military power, released Nov. 3.  

According to a Pentagon briefing paper highlighting changes from the 2020 edition of the report, “the accelerating pace of the [People’s Republic of China’s] nuclear expansion may enable [it] to have up to 700 deliverable nuclear warheads by 2027, … [and] at least 1,000 warheads by 2030, exceeding the pace and size” that the Defense Department previously projected. China is also shifting to a “launch on warning” posture for its nuclear weapons.

In its last report, the Pentagon said China had 200 nuclear warheads and was expected to double that number by the end of the decade, indicating nearly a trebling of its deployment pace in the coming years. Moreover, the new document only captures developments up to December 2020, and its 2021 release was about two months late, the Pentagon said. The pace may have accelerated even further since.

Air Force Secretary Frank Kendall, speaking at AFA’s Air, Space & Cyber Conference in September, foreshadowed the report, saying that, in his view, China is “developing a first-strike capability.”

The Pentagon was not as alarming, saying China’s plan for now is to develop a “credible second-strike” capacity with nuclear weapons, meaning enough could survive a first strike by the U.S. to retaliate with “multiple rounds of counterstrike, deterring an adversary with the threat of unacceptable damage.”

Even at 1,000 nuclear weapons, though, China will not have achieved parity with the U.S. in terms of warheads, according to a senior defense official who briefed reporters ahead of the report’s release.

According to a State Department disclosure in early October, the U.S. has 3,750 nuclear warheads, down from 3,805 a year earlier and 3,822 in 2018. The U.S. inventory has declined due to the decay of the warheads’ plutonium cores and a replacement pace that doesn’t keep up with retirements.

The Pentagon said the People’s Liberation Army Rocket Forces are developing new intercontinental ballistic missiles that will “significantly improve” their overall force, and they will be equipped with multiple independently targeted warheads, necessitating an increase in warhead production.

China is expanding its “capacity to produce and separate plutonium by constructing faster breeder reactors and reprocessing facilities,” the report said.

The PLARF “has commenced building at least three new solid-fueled ICBM silo fields, which will cumulatively contain hundreds of new ICBM silos,” the report noted. Concurrently, China is expanding its inventory of road-mobile DF-26 intermediate-range ballistic missiles, which can strike ground or maritime targets, and in 2020, fielded “its first hypersonic weapons system, the DF-17 hypersonic glide vehicle-capable medium-range ballistic missile.”

In August, China tested a globe-circling hypersonic weapon, which may have been the DF-17.

China has also built up its H-8 bomber force, adding a “nuclear air-launched ballistic missile,” effectively establishing China’s own version of a triad, along with intercontinental ballistic missiles and submarine-launched ballistic missiles.

The PRC also plans to “increase the peacetime readiness of its nuclear forces by moving to a launch-on-warning (LOW) posture with an expanded silo-based force,” the paper said.

There “clearly has been a change” in China’s approach to nuclear weapons, the defense official said. Besides diversifying its nuclear arsenal, China is also expanding the underlying infrastructure needed to make warheads and connect its weapons with a command and control network, he said.

“The nuclear expansion the PRC is undertaking is certainly very concerning to us,” the official asserted. It “raises some questions … They haven’t really explained why they’re doing it, [and] … we’d like to have more insight into their intentions.”

Compared to China’s historic stockpiles, “they’re moving in a direction that substantially exceeds where they’ve been before in numbers and capabilities,” the official said. This “reinforces the importance of pursuing some practical measures for risk reduction.” While China has a “no first use” of nuclear weapons policy, it is “suggesting in some of their professional military writings that maybe that wouldn’t apply” in all circumstances, the official said. Given that, and the shift to a launch-on-warning posture, “That just makes it more important that responsible powers that seek those capabilities … need to have discussions with each other,” he said.

The official declined to say more because the Nuclear Posture Review is ongoing, and the issue of China’s growing nuclear force will be dealt with in the resulting document.

The U.S. has urged China in recent years to participate in joint strategic arms talks with the U.S. and Russia, but China has declined, saying it is not interested. China is signatory to no nuclear arms agreements or protocols.

The report said China fields about 100 ICBMs in different basing modes, including roll-out and road-mobile missiles. It “appears to be doubling the numbers of launchers in some ICBM units.” The PLA is developing a “DF-5C and may be developing a DF-32 ICBM.”

China’s nuclear missile submarine fleet includes six boats, each of which can carry 12 CSS-N-14 (JL-2) sea-launched ballistic missiles. The next generation of SSBN submarine likely goes into production “in the early 2020s.” The new model will likely also have upgraded missiles.

The People’s Liberation Army Air Forces have operationally fielded the H-6N bomber—a derivative of Russia’s Tu-16 Badger bomber—“providing a platform for the air component” of China’s nascent triad. The H-6N force is developing tactics and the aircraft is equipped with an air-refueling probe. It also has a recessed space in the fuselage likely meant “for external carriage of an ALBM believed to be nuclear capable.”

The H-6N can carry six land-attack cruise missiles with a range allowing it to hit targets “in the second island chain” from airfields in the mainland. The H-6K is being equipped with YJ-12 anti-ship cruise missiles to hit targets in the same range, “significantly extending” the Chinese Navy’s reach.

The PLAAF “is also developing new medium- and long-range stealth bombers to strike regional and global targets,” the report said. While this was publicly announced in 2016, “it may take more than a decade to develop this type of advanced bomber,” the Pentagon said.

Pubblicato in: Cina, Devoluzione socialismo

Lituania. Blinken e Simonyte e le sanzione imposte dalla Cina. Lituania sulla brace.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-12-28.

Lituania__001

«China claims democratically governed Taiwan as its own territory»

«China downgraded its diplomatic ties with Lithuania last month after the opening of a representative office by Taiwan in Vilnius under its own name»

«China has told multinational companies to sever ties with Lithuania or face being shut out of the Chinese market, and the Asian economic power has told Continental AG, the German car tyres and parts maker, to stop using parts made in Lithuania»

«Lithuanian Prime Minister Ingrida Simonyte on Tuesday discussed U.S. support for Lithuania in response to Chines economic pressure with Secretary of State Antony Blinken»

* * * * * * *

Lituania. Cina bandisce le società che hanno rapporti con la Lituania. Vilnius ed EU sulla brace.

Russia espelle sette diplomatici della Slovakia, Lituania, Lettonia ed Estonia.

Unione Europea e Visegrad. Scontro (quasi) finale. La Lituania.

Lituania. Altra débâcle socialista. Socialdemocratici crollano al 15.5%.

CEEC. 2020. Interscambio per 103.5 mld Usd, +8.4%, nonostante l’epidemia.

China’s European Diplomacy

Asia alla conquista dell’Europa dell’Est.

* * * * * * *

I tempi sono mutati in gran fretta.

Non è più l’occidente liberal ad imporre sanzioni. Lo è invece la Cina che può imporle, con la formula che chi non accettasse che Formosa sia parte integrante della Cina si vedrebbe precluso il mercato cinese.

* * * * * * *


Lithuanian PM discusses China pressure with top U.S. diplomat Blinken.

Vilnius, Dec 21 (Reuters) – Lithuanian Prime Minister Ingrida Simonyte on Tuesday discussed U.S. support for Lithuania in response to Chinese economic pressure with Secretary of State Antony Blinken, her office said.

China downgraded its diplomatic ties with Lithuania last month after the opening of a representative office by Taiwan in Vilnius under its own name.

China has told multinational companies to sever ties with Lithuania or face being shut out of the Chinese market, and the Asian economic power has told Continental AG, the German car tyres and parts maker, to stop using parts made in Lithuania.

China claims democratically governed Taiwan as its own territory and has in the past two years stepped up military and diplomatic pressure to assert its sovereignty claims, fueling anger in Taipei and deep concern in Washington.

In a statement, Simonyte’s office said, “the Prime Minister has thanked the U.S. for its expressed solidarity and support to Lithuania.” “U.S. support to Lithuania, in response to Chinese economic pressure, was discussed during the call,” the statement said.

“It is important that like-minded countries which share respect to international rules must be in solidarity in face of economic pressure. We must continue to share information and coordinate our actions inside the EU and with U.S. and with democratic states in Indian-Pacific ocean region,” Simonyte was quoted in the statement as saying.