Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Senza categoria, Unione Europea

Slovakia. Exit polls. Ps 4 seggi, Smer 3.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-05-26.

2019-05-26__Slovakia__001

Il partito Progressive Slovakia (Ps) della presidente Zuzana Caputova avrebbe conquistato la maggioranza relativa con il 20.1% dei voti. Lo Smer mà sarebbe al 15.7%, e L’SNS al 12.1%.

Sono risultati non ufficiali.

Nota.

Alcuni media riportano il tutto come grande vittoria della Caputova.

Diamo piacevolmente atto che PS ho ottenuto la maggioranza relativa, che darebbe diritto a 4 europarlamentari, ma saremmo alquanto interdetti a definire ciò come ‘aver vinto le elezioni’.


Europee 2019, in Slovacchia gli exit poll premiano la coalizione progressista

I liberali di centrosinistra di Progressive Slovakia (Ps) della neo-presidente Zuzana Caputova hanno vinto le europee in Slovacchia, secondo i dati diffusi dal quotidiano ‘Dennik’. Sconfitta per i socialdemocratici dell’ex premier Robert Fico, al 15% contro il 24% di cinque anni fa. L’estrema destra si afferma come terza forza politica.

Annunci
Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Slovakia. Zuzana Čaputová. I liberal iniziano ad averne dei dubbi.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-04-21.

2019-04-19__Slovakia__001

Mrs Zuzana Čaputová è stata eletta presidente della Slovakia.

Zuzana Caputova eletta presidente della Slovakia.

Slovakia. Presidenziali. Caputova 40.04%. Una lezione da meditare.

Slovakia. Mrs Zuzana Caputova potrebbe vincere le elezioni presidenziali.

*

«As populist parties sweep into power across Europe, Slovakia takes a liberal turn by electing a leftist anti-corruption activist from outside the political establishment for president last month»

*

«For a traditional and religious country, electing a woman, a divorced mother living in an informal relationship, and a human rights lawyer holding liberal views on LGBT rights and abortion legislation constitutes a novelty and a shift in attitudes.»

*

«Zuzana Caputova’s victory not only represents a turning point for Slovakia, but also a ray of hope for the region where nationalist, anti-EU and anti-immigration sentiments have grown over the past years.»

*

«While liberals rejoice, some urge caution over the growing support for the far-right in Slovakia, as well as over voting alignment between the ruling SMER-DS and the far-right on social and ethical issues.»

*

«Although some would label Caputova’s triumph as a “victory for liberalism”, it is unclear whether the voters in Slovakia opted for a liberal candidate because they align with liberal values, or because their respect for the rule of law took priority over their personal conservativism when casting a vote»

*

«The two anti-system candidates – the conspirationist former justice minister Stefan Harabin and neo-fascist Marian Kotleba – together attracted nearly a quarter of the votes»

*

«According to the AKO agency opinion poll, public support for Kotleba’s anti-European, far-right People’s Party Our Slovakia (LSNS) rose from 9.5 percent in February to 11.5 percent in April»

*

«In the run up to the elections, the ruling SMER-DS and the far-right LSNS held talks, joined forces and aligned their votes on social and ethical issues, such as to cap retirement age at 64, or to halt ratification of a European treaty designed to combat violence against women. …. In addition to SMER-DS, the Centre-right Slovak National party and the populist We Are Family also held talks with the far-right. …. Considering political pragmatism and lack of consistency displayed by Robert Fico in the past, observers do not exclude that SMER-DS would align with any of the political parties represented in the parliament in order to push its agenda in the future.»

*

«Rather than voting for a woman, observers note, the public voted for the candidate who was credible, independent from the establishment, and who was perceived as capable of bringing about positive change»

*

«The office of the president is largely a ceremonial role in Slovakia, with the real powers of the state being vested in the hands of the prime minister.»

*

«Although the political sands in Slovakia are shifting and it is too early to make any predictions, one could imagine two political blocs consolidating ahead of the 2020 elections: a liberal-democratic one, led by the outgoing president Andrej Kisa and, symbolically, by the president-elect Caputova; and a nationalist bloc with authoritarian-coloured tendencies formed by parties such as SMER-DS, the Slovak National party and the We Are Family, which is connected to Marine Le Pen’s and Matteo Salvini’s ENF group»

* * * * * * *

Stando ai sondaggi eseguiti da Poll of Polls, lo Smer avrebbe il 19.7% e Progresívne Slovensko + Spolu otterrebero il 14.4% dei voti: messi assieme avrebbero il 34.4%, percentuale che non permetterebbe l’ingresso al governo.

Nel converso, Sloboda a Solidarita (Ecr) avrebbe il 12.9%, Ľudová strana – Naše Slovensko, ĽSNS (NI) l’11.5% e Obyčajní Ľudia l’8.6%: in totale raggiungerebbero il 33% dei suffragi. Sme Rodina, 10.7% non è stata conteggiata pur essendo chiaramente populista. Ma se fosse possibile una sinergia, il blocco di destra arriverebbe al 43.7% dei voti.

*

Le prossime elezioni dovrebbero chiarire alla fine la situazione numerica.

In linea generale, però, sembrerebbe prospettarsi un risultato elettorale non favorevole ai liberal.


EU Observer. 2019-04-17. Caputova triumph not yet a victory for Slovak liberalism

For a traditional and religious country, electing a woman, a divorced mother living in an informal relationship, and a human rights lawyer holding liberal views on LGBT rights and abortion legislation constitutes a novelty and a shift in attitudes.

*

As populist parties sweep into power across Europe, Slovakia takes a liberal turn by electing a leftist anti-corruption activist from outside the political establishment for president last month.

For a traditional and religious country, electing a woman, a divorced mother living in an informal relationship, and a human rights lawyer holding liberal views on LGBT rights and abortion legislation constitutes a novelty and a shift in attitudes.

Zuzana Caputova’s victory not only represents a turning point for Slovakia, but also a ray of hope for the region where nationalist, anti-EU and anti-immigration sentiments have grown over the past years.

While liberals rejoice, some urge caution over the growing support for the far-right in Slovakia, as well as over voting alignment between the ruling SMER-DS and the far-right on social and ethical issues.

Victory for liberalism?

Although some would label Caputova’s triumph as a “victory for liberalism”, it is unclear whether the voters in Slovakia opted for a liberal candidate because they align with liberal values, or because their respect for the rule of law took priority over their personal conservativism when casting a vote.

We should not forget about the first round of presidential elections, which revealed the uglier side of Slovak politics.

The two anti-system candidates – the conspirationist former justice minister Stefan Harabin and neo-fascist Marian Kotleba – together attracted nearly a quarter of the votes.

According to the AKO agency opinion poll, public support for Kotleba’s anti-European, far-right People’s Party Our Slovakia (LSNS) rose from 9.5 percent in February to 11.5 percent in April.

In the run up to the elections, the ruling SMER-DS and the far-right LSNS held talks, joined forces and aligned their votes on social and ethical issues, such as to cap retirement age at 64, or to halt ratification of a European treaty designed to combat violence against women.

In addition to SMER-DS, the Centre-right Slovak National party and the populist We Are Family also held talks with the far-right.

Considering political pragmatism and lack of consistency displayed by Robert Fico in the past, observers do not exclude that SMER-DS would align with any of the political parties represented in the parliament in order to push its agenda in the future.

Prime minister Peter Pellegrini, however, rejected any suggestion of a future coalition government with the far-right LSNS.

Gender equality in Slovakia

Observers also caution against jumping to conclusions over how progressive Slovak society is in terms of gender equality and women’s representation in national governments.

According to the 2017 Gender Equality Index of the European Institute for Gender Equality, Slovakia placed third to last among EU members in gender equality, performing on par with Romania and slightly better than Hungary and Greece.

In fact, in the run up to the elections, many doubted that a woman stood a chance of becoming a president in Slovakia.

Rather than voting for a woman, observers note, the public voted for the candidate who was credible, independent from the establishment, and who was perceived as capable of bringing about positive change.

As such, Caputova’s success should be viewed partly as a result of public disillusionment with the governing coalition a year after the killings of an investigative journalist and his fiancee, and partly as an outcome of her campaign, which displayed her authenticity, honesty, empathy, reluctance to undermine other candidates or to use aggressive vocabulary, and a strong record as an activist against injustice.

It was her image of authenticity and political decency that united the divided electorate in Slovakia.

In this regard, Caputova rise and appeal is comparable to that of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in the US Congress.

Beginning of the road to change

The office of the president is largely a ceremonial role in Slovakia, with the real powers of the state being vested in the hands of the prime minister.

Caputova nevertheless committed to ensuring justice for all Slovaks by reinforcing the independence of the public prosecutor’s office and in the naming of judges, which will fall under her responsibility.

Despite the limitations she will face, the symbolic value of her election should not be underestimated.

Caputova victory already boosted her Progressive Slovakia (PS) party’s prospects in EU elections and contributed to the consolidation the liberal camp at home.

Because her victory came at a low turnout of 40 percent, to push her agenda the president-elect will need to work together with, and secure the backing of, the parliament dominated by SMER-DS, led by Fico.

All eyes now turn to the national parliamentary elections, which are due in a year, and which will constitute the real test for the progressive left in Slovakia.

Although the political sands in Slovakia are shifting and it is too early to make any predictions, one could imagine two political blocs consolidating ahead of the 2020 elections: a liberal-democratic one, led by the outgoing president Andrej Kisa and, symbolically, by the president-elect Caputova; and a nationalist bloc with authoritarian-coloured tendencies formed by parties such as SMER-DS, the Slovak National party and the We Are Family, which is connected to Marine Le Pen’s and Matteo Salvini’s ENF group.

Rather than paving the way for a more liberal region, the situation in Slovakia can also take the Austrian turn, where a liberal president finds himself in a difficult position having to balance a right-wing coalition government.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Zuzana Caputova eletta presidente della Slovakia.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-03-31.

2019-03-31__Zuzana Caputova __001

Nessuno se ne era accorto. Dai fatti si sarebbe detto l’opposto.


Mrs Zuzana Caputova è stata eletta presidente della Slovakia conquistandosi il 58% dei suffragi: una vittoria chiara e netta.

Se è vero che la carica presidenziale in Slovakia sia in gran parte rappresentativa, sarebbe altrettanto vero ponderare con grande cura il contesto in cui tale elezione si è svolta e la personalità della neo-presidente.

*

La Slovakia negli ultimi anni è andata incontro a quel fenomeno di parcellizzazione del quadro politico che sta caratterizzando tutta l’Europa. I partiti tradizionali non richiamano più a lungo Elettori ed i partiti nuovi sulla scena non riescono ancora ad imporsi. Da questo punto di vista la vittoria di Mrs Zuzana Caputova potrebbe essere interpretata come il segno dell’emersione di un partito che possa raggiungere una maggioranza governativa senza dover scendere a compromessi con troppi altri partiti di una coalizione più obbligata che desiderata. Sempre da questa ottica, la chiarezza politica fa aggio sulle tesi propugnate: il chaos partitico è quasi immancabilmente foriero di severi vulnus alla democrazia.

Questa candidatura andata a buon fine ricorda, mutatis mutandis, l’irrompere sul proscenio politico di Mr Macron. In questa fase storica è diventato concretamente possibile che un nuovo partito e nuovi volti possano imporsi fino a conseguire anche la maggioranza. Il fenomeno sembrerebbe essere più ascrivibile al tracollo dei partiti tradizionali che a veementi capacità demagogiche delle nuove formazioni: l’Elettore vuole vedere volti nuovi e sentirsi proporre nuovi traguardi.

Altrettanto sicuramente l’Elettorato, e non solo quello slovacco, sente impellente la necessità di uomini politici ragionevolmente immuni dai fenomeni di corruzione che purtroppo sono stati un fatto costante in questa Europa negli ultimi lustri. Questo concetto potrebbe anche essere esteso. Un certo quale grado di corruzione è sempre insito nella gestione del potere: diventa problema severo quando travalica i limiti del sano buon senso e, soprattutto, quando dalle alte sfere diventa pessima abitudine della minutaglia politica ed amministrativa. L’Elettore medio sembrerebbe essere molto più tollerante verso un governante un po’ troppo spigliato piuttosto che nei confronti del vigile urbano che esige la tangente per non dare le multe di divieto di sosta. In altri termini, conta più il grado di percezione della corruzione che la sua reale entità.

In Slovakia si era assistito anche a fenomeno di rara gravità, quali l’assassinio di Mr Jan Kuciak, un reporter. Al momento, mandanti ed esecutori non sono ancora stati identificati in modo inequivocabile, e ciascuna fazione ne addossa la colpa alle altre. Fatto sta che gli Elettori proprio non ne vogliono più sapere di vivere in una collettività ove sia possibile l’omicidio politico.

Da ultimo, ma non certo per ultimo, si dovrebbe far notare la grande differenza che intercorre tra la conquista ed il mantenimento del potere. Il Macbeth di Shakespeare illustra ad arte questo problema. L’esperienza italiana del M5S  dovrebbe insegnare. Al momento, in questa particolare Europa, è abbastanza facile coagulare consensi attorno a degli slogan che soddisfino visceralmente l’Elettorato, ma una formazione politica che si contraddistingua per i ‘NO’ e per le dichiarazioni utopiche può forse raggiungere il potere, ma non riesce a mantenerlo: si disgrega rapidamente. Non solo. Per governare serve non solo il vasto consenso popolare, ma anche la disponibilità di persone che siano in grado di ricoprire tutta la sfaccettatura di governo e sottogoverno che la formazione politica deve occupare e dar significato. Se è facile proporsi come ‘anticorruzione’ è terribilmente difficile agire da elementi isolati, senza il pieno governo dell’apparato burocratico dello stato. Gli Elettori conferiscono un mandato, ma sono anche molto esigenti nell’esigere che esso sia portato a buon fine.

Se sicuramente la Caputova può al momento contare su solidi appoggi in sede dell’Unione Europea, altrettanto sicuramente è ancora debole patria e nulla vieta di pensare che con le prossime elezioni europee le vengano a mancare gli appoggi internazionali.

*

Vedremo come si comporterà Mrs Zuzana Caputova nel suo nuovo ruolo di presidente dello stato.

Se questa elezione costituisce sicuramente un valido precedente, altrettanto sicuramente si dovrebbe tener conto di altri fenomeni in atto in questa Europa dilaniata dal travaglio delle prossime elezioni europee.

Romania. Arrestata Laura Kövesi, candidata di Juncker a capo della Procura Europea.

Il caso della Kövesi non riguarda soltanto i fatti interni della Romania, bensì gli equilibri fluttuanti all’interno dell’Unione Europea e, più in generale, della situazione politica mondiale.

Se nulla vieta di pensare che l’elezione di Mrs Zuzana Caputova sia l’inizio di un rinnovamento, nulla vieterebbe di pensare che anche l’arresto della Kövesi sia solo il primo di una lunga lista.

*


Ansa. 2019-03-31. Slovacchia: Zuzana Caputova presidente

Comprensibilità, cordialità, affidabilità, capacità di evitare conflitti: queste le caratteristiche che hanno portato Zuzana Caputova, fino a poco tempo fa poco nota all’opinione pubblica, ad essere eletta presidente della Slovacchia.

“Sono felice del risultato – ha detto Caputova, dopo aver ringraziato i suoi elettori – perché si vede che nella politica si può entrare con opinioni proprie e la fiducia si può conquistare anche senza linguaggio aggressivo e colpi bassi. L’onestà nella politica può essere la nostra forza”. 

La 45enne, ex vicepresidente del piccolo partito non governativo ‘Slovacchia progressista’, è entrata in politica nel 2017 dopo la lotta durata anni contro una discarica illegale a Pezinok che l’ha messa contro gli uomini al potere e imprenditori controversi.

Nel ballottaggio, Caputova ha vinto con il 58% dei consensi sull’eurodeputato Maros Sefcovic, che si è fermato al 42% e ha riconosciuto la vittoria della avversaria. L’affluenza alle urne è stata del 41,8%.

*


Bbc. 2019-03-31. Zuzana Caputova becomes Slovakia’s first female president

Anti-corruption candidate Zuzana Caputova has won Slovakia’s presidential election, making her the country’s first female head of state.

Ms Caputova, who has almost no political experience, defeated high-profile diplomat Maros Sefcovic, nominated by the governing party, in a second round run-off vote.

She framed the election as a struggle between good and evil.

The election follows the murder of an investigative journalist last year.

Jan Kuciak was looking into links between politicians and organised crime when he was shot alongside his fiancée in February 2018.

Ms Caputova cited Mr Kuciak’s death as one of the reasons she decided to run for president, which is a largely ceremonial role.

With almost all votes counted, she has won about 58% to Mr Sefcovic’s 42%.

She gained prominence as a lawyer, when she led a case against an illegal landfill lasting 14 years.

Aged 45, a divorcee and mother of two, she is a member of the liberal Progressive Slovakia party, which has no seats in parliament.

In a country where same-sex marriage and adoption is not yet legal, her liberal views promote LGBTQ+ rights.

Anti-corruption candidate leads Slovak poll

The political novice bucking Europe’s populist trend

The opponent she defeated, Mr Sefcovic, is vice president of the European Commission.

He was nominated by the ruling Smer-SD party, which is led by Robert Fico, who was forced to resign as prime minister following the Kuciak murder.

In the first voting round, Ms Caputova won 40% of the vote, with Mr Sefcovic gaining less than 19%.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Slovakia. Presidenziali. Caputova 40.04%. Una lezione da meditare.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-03-17.

Pifferaio Magico. Hameln. Koppen.

 Lapide nella Chiesa di Hameln.


«Al secondo turno delle elezioni presidenziali in Slovacchia passano l’avvocatessa Zuzana Caputova e il diplomatico Maros Sefcovic»

*

«Dopo lo scrutinio del 92% dei voti del primo turno, la Caputova è in testa con il 40,04%, mentre Sefcovic ha ottenuto il 18,72%.»

*

«I see the message from voters as a strong call for change»

*

«The Slovak presidency is a largely ceremonial office, but the president has limited powers of veto over laws passed by parliament»

* * * * * * * *

Slovakia. Mrs Zuzana Caputova potrebbe vincere le elezioni presidenziali.

Le elezioni presidenziali hanno sempre avuto la grande caratteristica di essere centrate sulla personalità dei candidati forse ancor più che sui loro programmi.

Il successo di Mrs Zuzana Čaputová si presta ad alcune considerazioni che potrebbero anche essere estese a tutto l’elettorato europeo.

– Per quanto riguarda l’Unione Europea, nel 2008 il pil dell’eurozona era 14,113.094 miliardi Usd, ed a fine 2017 era 12,589.880 miliardi. Similmente, il pil procapite è crollato da 42,770 Usd a 36,670 Usd.

Riassumendo: il pil è sceso di 1,523.21 miliardi Usd ed il pil procapite di 6,100 Usd. Nel contempo, il pil cinese è cresciuto del 139%, quello indiano del 96% e quello degli Stati Uniti del 34%. Ricordiamo che questi dati sono espressi in dollari americani, non in euro.

Anche se la gente comune non ha presente codeste cifre, l’aria di stagnazione economica generalizzata grava pesante sull’eurozona. E l’inquietudine economica si ripercuote severamente sulle scelte politiche.

– In tutta l’Unione Europea si evidenzia una disaffezione degli Elettori nei confronti dei partiti tradizionali, che hanno perso quasi ovunque larghe quote di consenso. A questo fenomeno si è associata una frammentazione politica, per cui in quasi tutti gli stati sono presenti quasi una decina di formazioni politiche, ma con risultati difficilmente superiori al 10% – 15%. Questo fenomeno obbliga la formazione di coalizioni governative instabili, in quanto formate da partiti spesso con programmi divergenti.

– La conseguenza di quanto evidenziato è una impossibilità oggettiva ad affrontare le grandi sfide europee e nazionali. Questa è una palude politica chiaramente avvertita dall’Elettorato, che è diventato molto mobile: ci si dovrebbero aspettare successi impensabili, ma spesso per nulla duraturi. Nessun politico né alcun partito potrà considerare stabile l’Elettorato che lo ha espresso.

– Un altro grande problema che emerge è un fenomeno di gestione personalistica del potere che spesso sfocia in veri e propri episodi di corruzione fin troppo evidenti per poter essere tollerati dal popolo. Il comportamento etico e morale dei governanti sta rapidamente diventando un elemento di grande importanza. Tuttavia la onestà è solo un requisito, importante sicuramente ma non certo l’unico, di un governante.

* * *

Le conseguenze sono sotto gli occhi di tutti.

In tutta la Unione Europea assistiamo ad un fiorire di partiti politici ‘di protesta’: formula invero molto riduttiva.

Spesso arrivano a posti di grande responsabilità politica persone degnissime, ma digiune dei reali problemi che dovrebbero cercare di risolvere. Non solo. I nuovi eletti si scontrano con un apparato burocratico nominato e cresciuto dal pregresso governo e sono spesso facili prede di navigati marpioni.

I recenti accadimenti della Catalogna in Spagna e dei Gilets Jaunes in Francia dovrebbe anche indicarci come il tasso di esasperazione stia rapidamente salendo nell’europeo medio. E questo sarebbe un fenomeno da non trascurarsi. Nei climi politici rancorosi sorgono spesso dei demagoghi che trascinano le masse come il pifferaio magico.

*

Prendiamo quindi atto alla luce di quanto detto che Mrs Zuzana Čaputová potrebbe verosimilmente essere il nuovo presidente della Slovakia, che a breve dovrebbe andare alle elezioni politiche.

È un personaggio politico entrato prepotentemente in scena e che nel volgere di qualche mese è riuscito a conquistarsi una larga fetta dell’Elettorato. Verosimilmente la sua elezione potrebbe concorrere a stabilizzare il quadro politico slovacco.


Ansa. 2019-03-17. Slovacchia, sarà sfida Caputova-Sefcovic

Al secondo turno delle elezioni presidenziali in Slovacchia passano l’avvocatessa Zuzana Caputova e il diplomatico Maros Sefcovic.

 Dopo lo scrutinio del 92% dei voti del primo turno, la Caputova è in testa con il 40,04%, mentre Sefcovic ha ottenuto il 18,72%.
L’affluenza alle urne è stata del 46,04%. Il ballottaggio si terra’ il 30 marzo.


Bbc. 2019-03-17. Anti-corruption candidate Zuzana Caputova leads Slovak poll

Lawyer and anti-corruption campaigner Zuzana Caputova has easily won the first round of Slovakia’s presidential election.

She has just over 40% with Maros Sefcovic of the ruling Smer-SD party her nearest rival on less than 19%.

Ms Caputova came to prominence during mass protests sparked by the murder of a journalist who had been investigating political corruption.

As no candidate won more than 50%, a second-round run-off will be held.

Turnout was just under 50%.

If Ms Caputova, 45, wins the second round in a fortnight’s time, she will become Slovakia’s first female president.

“I see the message from voters as a strong call for change,” she said early on Sunday.

A member of the small Progressive Slovakia party, which has no seats in parliament, she is a newcomer to politics, whereas her conservative 52-year-old opponent is vice-president of the European Commission.

Ms Caputova first rose to prominence when she led a battle lasting 14 years against an illegal landfill.

More recently, Slovakia has seen large anti-government rallies following the murder of journalist Jan Kuciak and his fiancée in February last year.

The protests prompted Prime Minister Robert Fico to resign.

A new suspect in the killings was charged earlier this week with ordering the murders.

Four others were charged by investigators last year.

Ms Caputova was backed in her campaign by outgoing President Andrej Kiska, who did not seek a second term in office.

The Slovak presidency is a largely ceremonial office, but the president has limited powers of veto over laws passed by parliament.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Slovakia. Mrs Zuzana Caputova potrebbe vincere le elezioni presidenziali.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-03-16.

2019-03-16__Slovakia__001

Oggi si vota in Slovakia il primo turno delle elezioni presidenziali.

Due sono i candidati di rilievo.

Maroš Šefčovič, 1966, membro fino al 1990 del Communist Party of Czechoslovakia, quindi membro della direzione della socialdemocrazia. Una lunghissima carriera consumata all’interno delle strutture dell’Unione Europea.

Dal 2009 al 2010 è European Commissioner for Education, Training, Culture and Youth, dal 2010 al 2014 è European Commissioner for Interinstitutional Relations and Administration, dal 2014 ad oggi è European Commissioner for the Energy Union.

Un curriculum di tutto rispetto: può piacere o non piacere politicamente, ma nessuno potrebbe negare il valore intrinseco della persona.

Zuzana Čaputová, 1973, esponente di Progressive Slovakia, formazione politica non rappresentata in parlamento. Di ideologia liberal socialista, si è distinta come avvocato delle ngo operanti in Slovakia.

*

I sondaggi elettorali sono quasi impossibili da essere interpretati.

L’ultimo sondaggio della Phoenix Research darebbe Šefčovič al 19.8% e la Čaputová al 18.5%: tenendo conto dell’errore di stima, sarebbe un sostanziale testa a testa, che si risolverebbe quindi solo al secondo turno.

Lasciano invero molto perplessi i sondaggi pubblicati nel corso dell’ultimo mese da numerose società che darebbero la Čaputová al 37.9%, al 44.8% ed anche al 52.9%: li riportiamo in fotocopia per correttezza.

Ricordiamo come le elezioni politiche si terranno l’anno prossimo.

Nota.

Di fronte a sondaggi così discrepanti si resta impossibilitati di esprimere una qualsivoglia considerazione.

Li abbiamo riportati in fotocopia proprio per portare a conoscenza del largo pubblico l’intrinseca difficoltà che si incontra a trattare questi argomenti.


Bloomberg. 2019-03-16. Europe’s Populists Set for Slap in Slovakia’s Presidential Race

– NGO lawyer Caputova leads polls for first-round vote Saturday

– Anti-establishment judge, top EU official vie for runoff spot

*

An election in the heart of the European Union’s increasing populist eastern wing is poised to deliver a different kind of anti-establishment triumph.

Sandwiched between Poland and Hungary — perennial thorns in the side of Brussels officials — Slovakia is set to pick as president an NGO lawyer who backs EU integration, vows to fight nationalism and wants to rebuild a system skewed to favor politicians and their cronies.

Zuzana Caputova’s rise has been rapid. A year ago, her biggest claim to fame was stopping a well-connected businessman from building a landfill in Slovakia’s wine country. Now, polls indicate the 45-year-old will comfortably win Saturday’s ballot and will also prevail in a likely runoff two weeks later. She’s trouncing the pro-Russian populist candidate.

Her victory would be a marked departure from the governments in Warsaw and Budapest, which the EU accuses of trampling over democracy and the rule of law.

“Uniquely for the region, a liberal is leading polls by a wide margin,” said Otilia Dhand, senior vice president at Teneo Intelligence in Brussels. “But support has less to do with her ideological leanings and more to do with the fact that she represents a clear break from what voters perceive as corrupt and ineffective political elites.”

Caputova has ridden a wave of anti-government anger triggered last year’s murder of an investigative journalist and his fiancee. A local businessman was charged this week with ordering the killing. Inspired by her slogan — ‘Let’s fight evil together’ — voters have taken to the streets in the biggest protests since the fall of the Iron Curtain.

As vice-chairwoman of the Progressive Slovakia party, Caputova supports gay partnerships and adoption, a rare stance in the predominantly Catholic nation. Once deemed a long-shot for president, which is largely ceremonial but plays a key role in forming governments and appointing judges, she mesmerized audiences in television debates.

That helped her overtake former frontrunner Maros Sefcovic, vice president of the European Commission, who’s now in second place. While Slovaks generally embrace the EU, Sefcovic has suffered as the candidate of the ruling Smer party, whose three-term prime minister was ousted last year by anti-graft demonstrators.

Despite robust economic growth, record-low unemployment and rising living standards, some voters are turning away from traditional political forces toward figures mounting xenophobic campaigns.

Stefan Harabin, an anti-NATO Supreme Court judge, is Caputova’s main populist challenger. He says he’d take a more active foreign-policy role, working to annul sanctions against Russian and repel migrants.

But Harabin is a long way behind in the hunt to succeed incumbent Andrej Kiska, who’s stepping down after one term. He has just 12 percent support, compared with 45 percent for Caputova and about half that for Sefcovic, according to a Feb. 26-28 FOCUS survey. Caputova would get 64 percent in a runoff.

Polls open Saturday at 7 a.m. in Bratislava and runs until 10 p.m. There are no exit polls.

Caputova says Slovakia is at a crossroads.

“We’re facing a crisis of confidence in politics and democratic values are being doubted,” the mother-of-two said in the town of Zilina, a nationalist bastion where she was cheered by a packed crowd. “If we don’t stop this trend, extremists will gain more ground.”