Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Stati Uniti

Harris-Biden Administration. Stanno iniziando a litigarsi. Kamala-Harris.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-07-07.

Kamala Harris 001

Women make up 60% of White House staff, diversity total at 44%

«Women make up 60% of the White House staff appointed by President Joe Biden, while people from racially or ethnically diverse communities account for 44%, the White House on Thursday as it released an annual personnel report to Congress. ….

The administration had hired 1,500 presidential appointees across the federal government in the first 100 days in office, double the number hired by any prior administration in that time period»

* * * * * * *

La Harris-Biden Administration è diventata il tempio del matriarcato: 60% di femmine ed il restante di dubbia attribuzione.

La mentalità ed i comportamenti femminili regnano sovrani, facendo emergere vicende umane già mirabilmente descritte ne i Caratteri di Teofrasto, usando spesso proposizioni proslettiche.

Come in ogni gineceo che si rispetti, lo staff di Kamala Harris è stato definito essere un “managed chaos”: un nido di vipere.

* * * * * * *

«Harris’ staff struggles are nothing new. People who have worked for her in the past describe days as “managed chaos.” “The boss’ expectations won’t always be predictable,” said one former Harris Senate aide.»

«‘Not a healthy environment’: Kamala Harris’ office rife with dissent»

«There is dysfunction inside the VP’s office, aides and administration officials say. And it’s emanating from the top»

«When Vice President Kamala Harris finally made the decision to visit the Mexico border last week, people inside her own office were blindsided by the news»

«The handling of the border visit was the latest chaotic moment for a staff that’s quickly become mired in them»

«Harris’ team is experiencing low morale, porous lines of communication and diminished trust among aides and senior officials»

«Much of the frustration internally is directed at Tina Flournoy, Harris’ chief of staff, a veteran of Democratic politics who began working for her earlier this year»

«In interviews, 22 current and former vice presidential aides, administration officials and associates of Harris and Biden described a tense and at times dour office atmosphere»

«While much of the ire is aimed at Harris’ chief, two administration officials said the VP herself also bears responsibility for the way her office is run. “It all starts at the top,” said one of the administration officials, who like others requested anonymity to be able to speak candidly about a sensitive matter»

«It’s not a healthy environment and people often feel mistreated. It’s not a place where people feel supported but a place where people feel treated like s—.»

«→→ The dysfunction in the VP’s ranks threatens to complicate the White House’s carefully crafted image as a place staffed by a close-knit group of professionals working in concert to advance the president’s agenda ←←»

«Just six months in, some of those aides in the Office of the Vice President said they are eyeing other employment opportunities. Others have left already. In recent days, two top advance staffers, Karly Satkowiak and Gabrielle DeFranceschi, parted ways with Harris in what they and Harris officials said were long-planned departures, a point disputed by two other people familiar with the matter»

«If you have an opinion about how things should run and it’s not listened to, that can be frustrating»

«People who Clinton knew for decades all of a sudden couldn’t get through to him because Tina choked off contact»

«Recently, a Harris friend personally reached out to Flournoy on behalf of one of the party’s top donors to try to arrange a brief meeting. They were ignored. …. This is someone who has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars—millions, even—for your boss and you’re just blowing them off?»

«Next time Kamala wants [them] for something, it’s like, ‘Hey, I couldn’t even get a call-back from your chief of staff!’»

«People who have worked for her in the past describe days as “managed chaos.”»

«What’s more concerning for people inside and out of Harris’ orbit is staunching the bleeding among frustrated staff and meaningfully improving the low morale in the office, which could cause damage to her relationship with Biden and his team»

* * * * * * *


La Harris-Biden Administration sta abbrustolendo sul braciere repubblicano, incapace di gestire il senato ed adesso messa nel collimatore delle corti di giustizia, ivi compresa la Suprema Corte.

A ciò si aggiunga anche una non comune incapacità gestionale.

Ma midterm si sta avvicinando implacabilmente.

* * * * * * *


Cosa sta succedendo nell’ufficio di Kamala Harris?

Gli alleati della vicepresidente bocciano i rumors riportati da Politico e dalla Cnbc come parte di una campagna per “sabotarla”.

La Casa Bianca è intervenuta in difesa del vicepresidente Kamala Harris dopo le voci di tensioni e addirittura risse nel suo ufficio. Gli alleati della vicepresidente bocciano i rumors riportati da Politico e dalla Cnbc come parte di una campagna per “sabotarla”. Diversi portavoce della Casa Bianca e persino Ron Klain, capo di gabinetto del presidente Joe Biden, sono scesi in campo per difendere Harris: “È una campagna architettata per sabotarla”, ha affermato Cedric Richmond, uno dei più stretti consiglieri di Biden, al quotidiano digitale Axios.

Le voci sono iniziate mercoledì, quando Politico ha pubblicato un articolo che descrive, tra l’altro, il risentimento di diversi dipendenti Harris per non aver appreso che il vicepresidente stava pianificando un viaggio al confine messicano, visita avvenuta venerdì scorso.

Il giornale ha citato 22 funzionari ed ex funzionari dell’amministrazione Biden che hanno ritratto un’atmosfera tesa nell’ufficio di Harris, dove il morale del personale sarebbe basso e molti dipendenti sarebbero ai ferri corti con il capo di gabinetto della vicepresidente, la veterana stratega democratica Tina Flournoy.

Secondo le fonti consultate da Politico, Flournoy limiterebbe troppo l’accesso ad Harris, ritarda il processo decisionale ed è eccessivamente severa con alcuni membri della squadra. La portavoce della Casa Bianca Jen Psaki si è limitata a difendere Harris, senza commentare le presunte lamentele della sua squadra. “Il vicepresidente è un alleato incredibilmente importante per il presidente degli Stati Uniti. Ha un lavoro complesso, un lavoro duro e ha un’ottima squadra intorno a lei che la supporta”, ha sottolineato Psaki.

Allo stesso modo, il capo dello staff della Casa Bianca, Ron Klain, ha dichiarato alla CNN che Harris gode della “fiducia” di Biden e che il suo lavoro come vicepresidente “ha dato i suoi frutti”. Da quando è salito al potere a gennaio, Harris è diventato il bersaglio preferito dell’opposizione repubblicana, soprattutto dopo che si è intestata la missione di arginare l’immigrazione dal Centroamerica.

La popolarità di Harris è inferiore a quella di Biden, con il 44% rispetto al 51% del presidente, secondo una media dei sondaggi prodotti dal sito Real Clear Politics. Come vicepresidente, Harris è vista da molti nel partito come l’erede politico del 78enne Biden, che non ha chiarito la sua intenzione di candidarsi per un secondo mandato nel 2024. 

* * *


‘Not a healthy environment’: Kamala Harris’ office rife with dissent

There is dysfunction inside the VP’s office, aides and administration officials say. And it’s emanating from the top.

When Vice President Kamala Harris finally made the decision to visit the Mexico border last week, people inside her own office were blindsided by the news.

For days, aides and outside allies had been calling and texting with each other about the political fallout that a potential trip would entail. But when it became known that she was going to El Paso, it left many scrambling, including officials who were responsible for making travel arrangements and others outside the VP’s office charged with crafting the messaging across the administration.

The handling of the border visit was the latest chaotic moment for a staff that’s quickly become mired in them. Harris’ team is experiencing low morale, porous lines of communication and diminished trust among aides and senior officials. Much of the frustration internally is directed at Tina Flournoy, Harris’ chief of staff, a veteran of Democratic politics who began working for her earlier this year.

In interviews, 22 current and former vice presidential aides, administration officials and associates of Harris and Biden described a tense and at times dour office atmosphere. Aides and allies said Flournoy, in an apparent effort to protect Harris, has instead created an insular environment where ideas are ignored or met with harsh dismissals and decisions are dragged out. Often, they said, she refuses to take responsibility for delicate issues and blames staffers for the negative results that ensue.

While much of the ire is aimed at Harris’ chief, two administration officials said the VP herself also bears responsibility for the way her office is run. “It all starts at the top,” said one of the administration officials, who like others requested anonymity to be able to speak candidly about a sensitive matter.

“People are thrown under the bus from the very top, there are short fuses and it’s an abusive environment,” said another person with direct knowledge of how Harris’ office is run. “It’s not a healthy environment and people often feel mistreated. It’s not a place where people feel supported but a place where people feel treated like s—.”

The dysfunction in the VP’s ranks threatens to complicate the White House’s carefully crafted image as a place staffed by a close-knit group of professionals working in concert to advance the president’s agenda. It’s pronounced enough that members of the president’s own team have taken notice and are concerned about the way Harris’ staffers are treated.

Symone Sanders, senior advisor and chief spokesperson for Harris, pushed back against the complaints and defended Flournoy saying she has an “open door policy” and that “Black women like me would not have the opportunity to work in politics without Tina.” Of the chief of staff’s anonymous critics, she added: “People are cowards to do this this way.”

“We are not making rainbows and bunnies all day. What I hear is that people have hard jobs and I’m like ‘welcome to the club,’” Sanders added. “We have created a culture where people, if there is anything anyone would like to raise, there are avenues for them to do so. Whoever has something they would like to raise, they should raise it directly.”

Harris and Flournoy’s defenders also note that women in power—Black women in particular—are subjected to standards that men often don’t have to clear. A tough and demanding office environment may be seen as a virtue for one and a sign of disorder and lack of leadership acumen for another.

But for some of the people who know Harris best, it’s become an all-too-familiar pattern for a politician who has churned through several iterations of staff on her rise and took office with a team almost entirely new to her.

Just six months in, some of those aides in the Office of the Vice President said they are eyeing other employment opportunities. Others have left already. In recent days, two top advance staffers, Karly Satkowiak and Gabrielle DeFranceschi, parted ways with Harris in what they and Harris officials said were long-planned departures, a point disputed by two other people familiar with the matter.

For DeFranceschi, the deputy director of advance, the departure came down to a “difference in opinion on how things should run,” according to another person familiar with the matter, who said that Harris’ office is run “very different” from the Obama operation, where DeFranceschi previously worked. “If you have an opinion about how things should run and it’s not listened to, that can be frustrating.”

DeFranceschi did not respond to a request for comment.

A third Harris aide who worked on her digital team, Rajan Kaur, left the staff after opting not to relocate to Washington from Brooklyn.

Anita Dunn, a senior adviser to the president, defended Flournoy as well as the decision to keep news of the border trip contained among a small group of people, saying Harris’ office didn’t want it to leak or “turn it into a spectacle.”

“It was closely held and there may be people whose feelings were a little hurt on her staff that they weren’t brought into the discussion,” Dunn said. “But any suggestion that it was mishandled or kept a secret from people who needed to know about the arrangements or needed to know about it is absolutely not true.”

Asked if she was aware of the complaints about the VP’s office, Dunn replied that it was “not anywhere near what you are describing.”

Flournoy is a longtime Democratic operative who worked in President Bill Clinton’s White House as well as on Clinton’s reelection campaign and Vice President Al Gore’s 2000 campaign. She’s part of an informal group of Black women who’ve worked together for decades in Democratic politics, which includes Donna Brazile, Minyon Moore, Leah Daughtry and Yolanda Caraway.

“Look, [Tina’s] strong, she’s intelligent, she’s driven, and she expects strong, intelligent, driven people around her,” said Daughtry. “But some people may find strong, driven, smart people intimidating, but I think that’s more projection than reality because that’s just not Tina’s intent or style. And nothing in her experience would lead you to think that she’s an intimidating person.”

Flournoy is respected among operatives beyond that group. Indeed, some of the biggest names in Democratic politics who had gotten word of it called in advance of this story to speak well of her. Others took to Twitter on Tuesday to push back on a CNBC report that said Flournoy’s role as a gatekeeper for Harris was roiling outside allies and big donors who have seen their access to her severely curtailed.

The thrust of their critique was it’s the chief of staff’s role to shield their boss from outside influences and ensure only important matters land on their desk.

But Flournoy has developed a reputation for taking that sentry position to an extreme, often refusing to delegate and second-guessing other staffers, according to two people with direct knowledge of Flournoy’s time as President Bill Clinton’s post-presidential chief of staff, the job she held before Harris hired her.

 “People who Clinton knew for decades all of a sudden couldn’t get through to him because Tina choked off contact,” one of the people said, speaking on condition of anonymity. “Because Clinton didn’t use email”—he only used his BlackBerry to communicate with family, close friends and a handful of aides—”she was able to keep many FOBs [friends of Bill] out.”

While it’s part of a chief of staff’s job to limit access to her boss, the person added, “you can’t just flat out ignore people and not get back to them.”

In interviews with POLITICO, some aides and allies are concerned Harris is being ill-served by stepping too far back and letting her political apparatus atrophy. Flournoy has summarily rejected the idea of Harris spending more time tending to her past relationships or capitalizing on her new post to create new ones, a move that people in the VP’s orbit view as short-sighted.

Recently, a Harris friend personally reached out to Flournoy on behalf of one of the party’s top donors to try to arrange a brief meeting. They were ignored. The friend said it wasn’t clear whether Flournoy knew who they were. The donor also contacted Harris’ office personally to connect, and didn’t hear back for weeks. They eventually were told the VP was too busy to schedule some time.

“This is someone who has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars—millions, even—for your boss and you’re just blowing them off?” the Harris friend asked. “Next time Kamala wants [them] for something, it’s like, ‘Hey, I couldn’t even get a call-back from your chief of staff!’”

Every vice president has had to balance the demands of being a supportive second-in-command while also keeping an eye on future political opportunities. But Harris’ task is more complicated. It’s not clear whether Biden will run again in 2024—at which point she’d be the logical standard-bearer for the party. She also has felt an acute need to demonstrate her loyalty to Biden after working hard to earn it prior to being nominated as his veep.

For that reason, some outside allies acknowledged that Harris has gone out of her way not to engage in politicking—either subtle or overt—given the sensitivities among Biden’s own team. But far more of the allies maintain that it’s unreasonable, foolish even, not to support efforts to burnish her own profile while seemingly every other Democrat with national ambitions is allowed to hobnob with political acquaintances and cozy up to donors.

“She’s been in public life for 30 years. F—. You don’t just all of a sudden go radio silent,” added another Harris confidant and long-serving former aide. The person rejected the idea that Harris is unaware of the problems in her office.

“She is the most perceptive person on the planet,” the person said. “She might not have first-hand knowledge, but it’s hard to imagine she doesn’t have a sense of what’s going on.”

Harris’ staff struggles are nothing new. People who have worked for her in the past describe days as “managed chaos.” “The boss’ expectations won’t always be predictable,” said one former Harris Senate aide.

Her presidential campaign operation imploded in a painful maze of finger-pointing and leaks. Harris jettisoned nearly everyone from that campaign and returned to the Senate in 2020 with her government staff and a small outside political operation in tow. When she was put on the presidential ticket, she was given a staff of mostly handpicked, trusted aides from Bidenworld. It did the job. The team avoided the spiral of internal backbiting.

The pressure-packed VP’s office has been a different story, and it hasn’t helped that few of her aides had any familiarity with their boss or her chief of staff when they started their jobs.

The morale level for current Harris staffers is “rough” and in many ways similar to the failed presidential campaign and her Senate office, according to the former Senate aide, who is in touch with current Harris staffers.

Part of what has created that climate is the portfolios that Harris has accepted to work on, which include some of the most intractable issues facing the Biden administration. Harris was, early on, tasked with tackling the root causes of the flow of migrants to the southern border. It immediately made her the focus of conservative criticism, including the demand that she personally go to the southern border to assess the situation.

For weeks, Harris’ aides argued that she didn’t have to go there right away to show leadership on the issue. Instead, she flew to the countries where the migrants were originating and traveling through.

The trip to Guatemala and Mexico had its share of bumps. In an interview with NBC News, Harris scoffed at the idea she’d go to the border, by arguing that she hadn’t been to Europe, either. The answer spawned a flurry of stories quoting former staffers about her shortcomings in impromptu moments, which frustrated Harris personally, as well as members of her team.

Weeks later, Harris finally decided to take the trip to El Paso. Her team insisted that it was not in response to her critics. But other aides and confidants said it was evident she was trying to just move past the coverage and, in doing so, may have helped affirm the right-wing misinformation campaign against her.

It didn’t help matters that the border visit seemed hastily put together, symbolized by a news conference Harris held in which she struggled to speak over the engine of a roaring plane.

Harris’ defenders argue that these moments are overblown; that few people beyond the politically obsessive will remember the din of a press conference or whether she went to the border on her own volition or under duress.

“Vice President Harris is focused on the work, not the chatter at the water cooler,” Sanders said.

What’s more concerning for people inside and out of Harris’ orbit is staunching the bleeding among frustrated staff and meaningfully improving the low morale in the office, which could cause damage to her relationship with Biden and his team. Harris, these people said, excels when those around her project calm and order, creating a sense of confidence and certainty.

“When people feed her anxieties, all of that goes away,” said another Harris friend, “exacerbating the bad tendencies.”

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Stati Uniti

Biden. Ordine esecutivo sulle catene di approvvigionamento critiche per economia e sicurezza.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-03-01.

Biden 001

«Remember that old proverb: “For want of a nail, the shoe was lost.  For want of a shoe, the horse was lost.”  And it goes on and on until the kingdom was lost, all for the want of a horseshoe nail.»

*

«Remarks by President Biden at signing of an executive order on supply chains»

«The Vice President and I had a very productive meeting with a bipartisan group of senators and House members to address an issue of both concern to our economic security, as well as our national security: the resilience and reliability of our critical supply chains»

«This is a critical area where Republicans and Democrats agreed it was one of the best meetings — it’s the best meeting I think we’ve had so far, although we’ve only been here about five week»

«And the bottom line is simple: The American people should never face shortages in the goods and services they rely on, whether that’s their car or their prescription medicines or the food at the local grocery store.»

«And remember, the shortages in PPE during this pandemic –that meant we didn’t have the masks; we didn’t have gowns or gloves to protect our frontline health workers»

«And they were rewashing and reusing their masks over and over again in the OR.»

«That should never have never happened»

«And this will never happen again in the United States, period»

«We shouldn’t have to rely on a foreign country»

«And the best way to do that is by protecting and sharpening America’s competitive edge by investing here at home»

«Resilient, diverse, and secure supply chains are going to help revitalize our domestic manufacturing capacity and create good-paying jobs, not $15 an hour — which is what we need to do someday»

«And all this won’t just strengthen our domestic capacity, it will help unleash new markets around the world and grow opportunities for American businesses to export their goods that we’re going to be making»

«Remember that old proverb: “For want of a nail, the shoe was lost.  For want of a shoe, the horse was lost.”  And it goes on and on until the kingdom was lost, all for the want of a horseshoe nail.»

«Even small failures at one point in the supply chain can cause outside impacts further up the chain»

«Recently, we’ve seen how a shortage of computer chips — computer chips like the one I have here — you can hardly see it I imagine; it’s called a “semiconductor” — has caused delays in production of automobiles that has resulted in reduced hours for American workers»

«I’m directing senior officials in my administration to work with industrial leaders to identify solutions to this semiconductor shortfall and work very hard with the House and Senate»

«But we all recognize that the particular problem won’t be solved immediately»

«The order I’m about to sign does two things.  First, it orders a 100-day review of four vital products: semiconductors — one; key minerals and materials, like rare earths, that are used to make everything from harder steel to airplanes; three, pharmaceuticals and their ingredients; four, advanced batteries, like the ones used in electric vehicles»

«There’s strong bipartisan support for fast reviews of these four areas because they’re essential to protecting and strengthening American competitiveness»

«I’m grateful for the members of Congress who came to see me — Republican leaders, as well as Democrats.»

* * * * * * *

Biden sta inaugurando un nuovo modo di amministrare la cosa pubblica. Una sorta di concertazione tra i due partiti, ove le differenze non siano ostacolo contrapposto, bensì due differenti modi di vedere la realtà, fatto questo che consente di migliorare i provvedimenti da prendersi.

Solo il tempo dirà se questa sia una iniziativa proficua, ma in questo momento sembrerebbe proprio poterlo essere.

Nota.

Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes.

*


White House. Remarks by President Biden at Signing of an Executive Order on Supply Chains

THE PRESIDENT:  Good afternoon.  The Vice President and I had a very productive meeting with a bipartisan group of senators and House members to address an issue of both concern to our economic security, as well as our national security: the resilience and reliability of our critical supply chains.

This is a critical area where Republicans and Democrats agreed it was one of the best meetings — it’s the best meeting I think we’ve had so far, although we’ve only been here about five weeks.  But it was like the old days — people actually are on the same page. 

There were — good, bipartisan work has already been done.  The leaders of this operation in the House and Senate already did — have done great work, and I want to thank them for their leadership.

We’re here to build on that.  And the bottom line is simple: The American people should never face shortages in the goods and services they rely on, whether that’s their car or their prescription medicines or the food at the local grocery store.

And remember, the shortages in PPE during this pandemic –that meant we didn’t have the masks; we didn’t have gowns or gloves to protect our frontline health workers.

We heard horror stories of doctors and nurses wearing trash bags over their gown — over their dress in order to — so they wouldn’t be in trouble, because they had no gowns.  And they were rewashing and reusing their masks over and over again in the OR.

That should never have never happened.  And this will never happen again in the United States, period.  We shouldn’t have to rely on a foreign country — especially one that doesn’t share our interests or our values — in order to protect and provide our people during a national emergency. 

That’s why one of the first executive orders I signed, as some may remember, was to ensure that we’re manufacturing more protective equipment for healthcare workers here at home.

And today, I’m shortly going to be signing another executive order that’ll help address the vulnerabilities in our supply chains across additional critical sectors of our economy so that the American people are prepared to withstand any crisis and rely on ourselves.

This is about making sure the United States can meet every challenge we face in this new era — pandemics, but also in defense, cybersecurity, climate change, and so much more.  And the best way to do that is by protecting and sharpening America’s competitive edge by investing here at home.  As I’ve said from the beginning, while I was running: We’re going to invest in America.  We’re going to invest in American workers.  And then we can be in a much better position to even compete beyond what we’re doing now.

Resilient, diverse, and secure supply chains are going to help revitalize our domestic manufacturing capacity and create good-paying jobs, not $15 an hour — which is what we need to do someday.  And sooner is better, in my view.  But jobs that are at the prevailing wage. 

We’re going to spare new — spur new opportunities for small businesses, communities of color, and economically distressed areas.  And I will drive new investment in research and innovation and our workforce, investing in training and university partnerships that are going to lead to new technologies and new solutions. 

And all this won’t just strengthen our domestic capacity, it will help unleash new markets around the world and grow opportunities for American businesses to export their goods that we’re going to be making. 

These are the kinds of commonsense solutions that all Americans can get behind — workers and corporate leaders, Republicans and Democrats.  It’s about resilience, identifying possible points of vulnerabilities in our supply chains, and making sure we have the backup alternatives or workarounds in place. 

Remember that old proverb: “For want of a nail, the shoe was lost.  For want of a shoe, the horse was lost.”  And it goes on and on until the kingdom was lost, all for the want of a horseshoe nail.  Even small failures at one point in the supply chain can cause outside impacts further up the chain. 

Recently, we’ve seen how a shortage of computer chips — computer chips like the one I have here — you can hardly see it I imagine; it’s called a “semiconductor” — has caused delays in production of automobiles that has resulted in reduced hours for American workers.  A 21st century horseshoe nail. 

This semiconductor is smaller than a postage stamp, but it has more than 8 billion transistors — 8 billion transistors, 10,000 times thinner than a single human hair in this one chip.  These chips are a wonder of innovation and design that powers so much of our country, enables so much of our modern lives to go on — not just our cars, but our smartphones, televisions, radios, medical diagnostic equipment, and so much more.

We need to make sure these supply chains are secure and reliable.  I’m directing senior officials in my administration to work with industrial leaders to identify solutions to this semiconductor shortfall and work very hard with the House and Senate.  They’ve authorized the bill, but they need (inaudible) $37 billion, short term, to make sure we have this capacity.  We’ll push for that as well.  But we all recognize that the particular problem won’t be solved immediately. 

In the meantime, we’re reaching out to our allies, semiconductor companies, and others in the supply chain to ramp up production to help us resolve the bottlenecks we face now.  We need help to stop — we need to stop playing catch up after the supply-chain crisis hit.  We need to prevent the supply chain crisis from hitting in the first place. 

And in some cases, building resilience will mean increasing our production of certain types of elements here at home.  In others, it’ll mean working more closely with our trusted friends and partners, nations that share our values, so that our supply chains can’t be used against us as leverage. 

It will mean identifying and building surge capacity that can quickly be turned into and ramped up production in times of emergency.  And it will mean investing in research and development, like we did in the ’60s, to ensure long-term competi- — competitiveness in our manufacturing base in the decades ahead.

The order I’m about to sign does two things.  First, it orders a 100-day review of four vital products: semiconductors — one; key minerals and materials, like rare earths, that are used to make everything from harder steel to airplanes; three, pharmaceuticals and their ingredients; four, advanced batteries, like the ones used in electric vehicles.

There’s strong bipartisan support for fast reviews of these four areas because they’re essential to protecting and strengthening American competitiveness.

Second, this order initiates a long-term review of the industry basis of six sectors of our overall economy over the next year.  These reviews will identify policy recommendations to 40 of [fortify] our supply chains, to — it should be to fortify our supply chains at every step, and critically, to start implementing those recommendations right away.  We’re not going to wait for a review to be completed before we start closing the existing gaps. 

And as we implement this work, my administration will draw on a full range of American talent — including labor and industry leaders, policy experts, scientists, farmers, engineers — to get their input. 

I’m grateful for the members of Congress who came to see me — Republican leaders, as well as Democrats.  They’re leading the way.  We’re going to stay in close contact with members of both sides of the aisle and keep advancing our shared goals. 

Everyone has a role to play to strengthen our supply chains in our — and our country.  This is the United States of America.  We are better prepared to meet the challenges of the 21st century than any country in the world.  There’s nothing, nothing, nothing we’ve ever failed to achieve if we work together.  And that’s what we decided to do today, and that’s what we’re going to do: work together. 

So I thank you all.  I’m very optimistic about the meeting we had today with our congressional colleagues.  And now I’m going to walk over and sign that executive order.

(The executive order is signed.)

*

Biden orders review of U.S. supply chains for key products, sectors

WASHINGTON, Feb. 24 (Xinhua) — U.S. President Joe Biden on Wednesday signed an executive order directing a review of supply chains for key products and sectors to address vulnerabilities and risks in U.S. supply chains, which business insiders hope will not result in new trade barriers.

The order directs an immediate 100-day review across federal agencies to address vulnerabilities in the supply chains of pharmaceuticals, critical minerals, semiconductors and large-capacity batteries, according to the White House.

It also calls for a one-year review of supply chain risks in six key sectors of the overall economy, specifically the sectors of the defense, energy, transportation, public health, information communications technology, agricultural commodities and food production.

“Resilient, diverse, and secure supply chains are going to help revitalize our domestic manufacturing capacity and create good-paying jobs,” Biden said at the White House before signing the order, adding the government is reaching out to U.S. allies and semiconductor companies to identify solutions to the current shortages of semiconductor chips, which have forced slowdowns at U.S. car manufacturing plants.

Christopher Roberti, senior vice president for cyber, intelligence and supply chain security policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, said Wednesday that the chamber hopes the administration will engage closely with the private sector to ensure that any policy recommendations “reject punitive approaches, new trade barriers, and one-size-fits-all solutions.” Enditem