Pubblicato in: Geopolitica Europea

Donbas. Ordinata la mobilizzazione generale dai 18 ai 55 anni.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-02-21.

Donbas 002

«Pro-Russian separatist leader calls for full military mobilization in Ukraine’s Donetsk region»

«Russia claims the surge of forces, which began in the autumn, has always been for military exercises and that it poses no threat to Ukraine or any other nation»

«A separatist leader in Ukraine ordered a full military mobilisation on Saturday amid ongoing tension between Moscow and Kiev»

«Denis Pushilin, the head of the pro-Russian separatist government in the Donetsk region has signed a decree on general mobilization»

«The People’s Council of the DPR has approved the decree of the head of the DPR on general mobilization»

«The Russian-backed leaders of Ukraine’s two breakaway regions have announced a general mobilisation, spurring fears of a further escalation in fighting in the ex-Soviet country»

«I urge my fellow citizens who are in the reserves to come to military conscription offices. Today I signed a decree on general mobilisation»

«I appeal to all the men in the republic who can hold weapons to defend their families, their children, wives, mothers, … Together we will achieve the coveted victory that we all need»

«Pasechnik said all men aged 18 to 55 were banned from leaving the area following the general mobilisation order»

* * * * * * *

In effetti, i russi non hanno gran bisogno di entrare in Ukraina, visto che ci sono già.

La popolazione del Donbas è russa e mantiene la lingua russa: forma una entità di fatto da tempo separata dall’Ukraina ed ora anche in grado di competere militarmente.

Impredicibili le possibili conseguenze.

La più probabile potrebbe essere una guerra civile che potrebbe portare al crollo dell’attuale regime ukraino, aprendo la strada ad interventi umanitari pacificatori.

In ogni caso, però, questa mossa spiazza Joe Biden e l’intelligence americana.

* * * * * * *


Pro-Russian separatist leader calls for full military mobilization in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.

Russia claims the surge of forces, which began in the autumn, has always been for military exercises and that it poses no threat to Ukraine or any other nation.

* * *

Donetsk: A separatist leader in Ukraine ordered a full military mobilisation on Saturday amid ongoing tension between Moscow and Kiev, according to media report.

Denis Pushilin, the head of the pro-Russian separatist government in the Donetsk region has signed a decree on general mobilization.

“The People’s Council of the DPR has approved the decree of the head of the DPR on general mobilization,” Sputnik News Agency reported citing a council member Vladislav Berdichevsky.

Russia’s recent build-up of around 150,000 troops just over the border from the Donbas region in the east, in Belarus to the north and Crimea to the south, which began in the autumn, has escalated tensions.

Russia claims the surge of forces has always been for military exercises and that it poses no threat to Ukraine or any other nation, but has refused to offer any real explanation for the biggest build-up of military might in Europe since the Cold War.

The US Embassy in Kiev informed on Thursday that Russia’s shelling of Stanytsia Luhanska in Ukrainian government-controlled territory in Donbas hit a kindergarten, injured two teachers, and knocked out power in the village.

“Russia’s shelling of Stanytsia Luhanska in Ukrainian government-controlled territory in Donbas hit a kindergarten, injured two teachers, and knocked out power in the village. The aggressor in Donbas is clear – Russia,” tweeted US Embassy in Kiev.

Meanwhile, the Russian Emergencies Ministry told Sputnik today that Rostov Region has opened 15 border crossings for refugees from the eastern Ukrainian region of Donbas.

Defence officials in Moscow have said since Tuesday that troops and military hardware are pulling back, having completed some of the drills. Western intelligence officials say, on the contrary, that Russia has moved roughly 7,000 more troops close to the borders in recent days. (ANI)

* * * * * * *


Separatists in Ukraine order ‘general mobilisation’ amid shelling

Announcement comes as Kyiv says a Ukrainian soldier was killed in shelling by rebels in the east of the country.

* * *

The Russian-backed leaders of Ukraine’s two breakaway regions have announced a general mobilisation, spurring fears of a further escalation in fighting in the ex-Soviet country.

The announcements on Saturday came as pro-Russian rebels and Ukraine accused each other of fresh attacks, and Kyiv said a Ukrainian soldier had been killed in separatist shelling.

“I urge my fellow citizens who are in the reserves to come to military conscription offices. Today I signed a decree on general mobilisation,” Denis Pushilin, the leader of the so-called Donetsk People’s Republic, said in a video statement.

Pushilin claimed his region’s forces had prevented attacks he said were planned by the Ukrainian security services, and that the Ukrainian army had launched attacks – accusations that Ukrainian officials have vehemently denied.

“I appeal to all the men in the republic who can hold weapons to defend their families, their children, wives, mothers,” Pushilin added. ”Together we will achieve the coveted victory that we all need.”

The leader of the Luhansk separatist region, Leonid Pasechnik, followed Donetsk in issuing a general mobilisation order to prepare for “repelling aggression”.

Pasechnik said all men aged 18 to 55 were banned from leaving the area following the general mobilisation order.

Kyiv has repeatedly denied any plans to regain control of separatist-held areas using force or of the Crimean peninsula, which was annexed by Moscow in 2014.

Western leaders have for weeks raised the alarm over a build-up of Moscow’s army around Ukraine with Washington warning that an imminent attack could take place.

Kyiv said a Ukrainian soldier was killed on Saturday in clashes with separatists.

“As a result of a shelling attack, one Ukrainian soldier received a fatal shrapnel wound,” the joint military command for east Ukraine reported.

The Ukrainian military said on its Facebook page that it had recorded 19 ceasefire violations by the separatists since the start of the day compared with 66 cases over the previous 24 hours.

Separatists opened fire on more than 20 settlements, using heavy artillery, which has been banned by Minsk agreements, the military said.

More than 14,000 people have been killed in fighting between Ukraine’s army and Moscow-supported separatists since fighting broke out in 2014.

Meanwhile, evacuations of towns and villages in the Luhansk and Donetsk regions continued. According to the Donetsk separatists early on Saturday, more than 6,000 people have already been brought to safety, including 2,400 children. Shelters are ready for these people in the southern Russian region of Rostov.

The separatist leaders had called for people to flee on Friday, justifying the appeal with a threatened attack by Ukrainian government troops.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Stati Uniti

Usa. Disoccupazione iniziale 248k, continua 1,593k. Aumentano, non diminuiscono.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-02-17.

2022-02-17__ Usa Disoccupazione 001

– Producer Price Index, PPI, +9.7%

– Core Consumer Price Index, CPI, +6.0%.

* * * * * * *

A seguito, riportiamo una traduzione in italiano per coloro che non abbiano dimestichezza con la lingua inglese.

* * * * * * *


Jobless claims: Another 248,000 Americans filed new claims last week

New weekly jobless claims unexpectedly rose last week, ending a three-week streak of improvements.

The Labor Department released its latest weekly jobless claims report Thursday at 8:30 a.m. ET. Here were the main metrics from the print compared to consensus estimates compiled by Bloomberg:

                         – Initial jobless claims, week ended Feb. 12: 248,000 vs. 218,000 expected and a revised 225,000 during prior week

                         – Continuing claims, week ended Feb. 5: 1.593 million vs. 1.605 million expected, and a revised 1.619 million during prior week

Even with the rise in filings last week, jobless claims hovered near pre-pandemic levels, given that 2019’s weekly average of new claims was approximately 220,000. In February last year, jobless claims were still coming in at a weekly rate of about 800,000 as virus-related pressures weighed on the labor market.

Initial jobless claims edged higher in January to near 300,000 around the time that Omicron cases surged to a record level in the U.S. Though the virus-induced impact appeared as a brief bump higher in the weekly jobless claims data, the latest monthly jobs report showed surprising resilience. Non-farm payrolls soaring by a much greater-than-expected 467,000 in January while the labor force participation rate rose more than expected.

“The Omicron wave triggered a brief but startling spike in initial jobless claims, but payroll growth slowed only marginally in January, and the initial data for February from Homebase point to a rebound,” Ian Shepherdson, chief economist for Pantheon Macroeconomics, wrote in a note. “At the same time, we are becoming increasingly convinced that the long-awaited rebound in labor participation is now underway, especially among women, who left the labor force in disproportionate numbers when schools and child care were closed.”

“Participation is unlikely to return to its pre-COVID level, thanks in part to early retirement among older people, who have seen big increases in the value of their homes and other assets, but we hope it will rise far enough to ease the pressure on wage growth,” he added.

This week’s jobless claims data also coincides with the survey week for the February jobs report, serving as an advanced indicator of the strength of the labor market heading into that print.

But while labor market data remain an important signal of the health of the broader economy, for policymakers, these reports have been overshadowed by the decades-high prints on inflation emerging as of late. With consumer prices soaring at the fastest rate in four decades, Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) members have now appeared to shift their focus to bringing down inflation rather than further stoking the labor market, which has already shown significant progress in bringing many back to work and providing ample opportunities for workers to switch jobs.

“At the January meeting, the FOMC strongly signaled conditions were ripe for rate hikes starting in March by stressing the risks of persistent, above target inflation and the progress made in the labor market,” Sam Bullard, managing director and senior economist at Wells Fargo Corporate and Investment Banking, wrote in a note. “For now, we continue to think the most likely outcome is that the Fed will act in a ‘measured’ way, with 25 bps hikes.”

* * * * * * *


Richieste di lavoro: Altri 248.000 americani hanno presentato nuove richieste la scorsa settimana

Le nuove richieste di lavoro settimanali sono aumentate inaspettatamente la scorsa settimana, terminando una serie di tre settimane di miglioramenti.

Il Dipartimento del Lavoro ha rilasciato il suo ultimo rapporto settimanale sulle richieste di lavoro giovedì alle 8:30 a.m. ET. Ecco le principali metriche dalla stampa rispetto alle stime di consenso compilate da Bloomberg:

                         – Richieste iniziali senza lavoro, settimana conclusa il 12 febbraio: 248.000 contro 218.000 previsto e un 225.000 rivisto durante la settimana precedente

                         – Sollecitazioni continue, settimana conclusa il 5 febbraio: 1,593 milioni contro 1,605 milioni previsti e 1,619 milioni rivisti durante la settimana precedente

Anche con l’aumento dei depositi la scorsa settimana, le richieste di lavoro si sono aggirate vicino ai livelli pre-pandemici, dato che la media settimanale delle nuove richieste del 2019 era di circa 220.000. Nel febbraio dell’anno scorso, i reclami senza lavoro arrivavano ancora a un tasso settimanale di circa 800.000 mentre le pressioni legate al virus pesavano sul mercato del lavoro.

Le richieste iniziali di disoccupazione sono aumentate a gennaio fino a circa 300.000 nel periodo in cui i casi di Omicron hanno raggiunto un livello record negli Stati Uniti. Sebbene l’impatto indotto dal virus sia apparso come un breve aumento nei dati settimanali delle richieste di lavoro, l’ultimo rapporto mensile sui posti di lavoro ha mostrato una sorprendente capacità di recupero. I libri paga non agricoli sono aumentati di molto più del previsto di 467.000 a gennaio, mentre il tasso di partecipazione della forza lavoro è aumentato più del previsto.

“L’onda Omicron ha innescato un breve ma sorprendente picco nelle richieste iniziali di disoccupazione, ma la crescita dei libri paga ha rallentato solo marginalmente a gennaio, e i dati iniziali per febbraio da Homebase indicano un rimbalzo”, ha scritto Ian Shepherdson, capo economista di Pantheon Macroeconomics, in una nota. “Allo stesso tempo, siamo sempre più convinti che il tanto atteso rimbalzo nella partecipazione al lavoro sia ora in corso, soprattutto tra le donne, che hanno lasciato la forza lavoro in numero sproporzionato quando le scuole e la cura dei bambini sono state chiuse.”

“È improbabile che la partecipazione torni al suo livello pre-COVID, grazie in parte al pensionamento anticipato tra gli anziani, che hanno visto grandi aumenti nel valore delle loro case e di altri beni, ma speriamo che aumenti abbastanza da allentare la pressione sulla crescita dei salari”, ha aggiunto.

I dati sui disoccupati di questa settimana coincidono anche con la settimana del sondaggio per il rapporto sui posti di lavoro di febbraio, servendo come un indicatore avanzato della forza del mercato del lavoro verso quella stampa.

Ma mentre i dati del mercato del lavoro rimangono un segnale importante della salute dell’economia in generale, per i politici, questi rapporti sono stati oscurati dalle stampe decennali sull’inflazione che stanno emergendo di recente. Con l’impennata dei prezzi al consumo al ritmo più veloce degli ultimi quattro decenni, i membri del Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) sembrano ora spostare la loro attenzione sulla riduzione dell’inflazione piuttosto che sull’ulteriore stimolazione del mercato del lavoro, che ha già mostrato progressi significativi nel riportare molti al lavoro e nel fornire ampie opportunità ai lavoratori di cambiare lavoro.

“Alla riunione di gennaio, il FOMC ha segnalato con forza che le condizioni erano mature per un rialzo dei tassi a partire da marzo, sottolineando i rischi di un’inflazione persistente e superiore all’obiettivo e i progressi fatti nel mercato del lavoro”, ha scritto in una nota Sam Bullard, managing director e senior economist di Wells Fargo Corporate and Investment Banking. “Per ora, continuiamo a pensare che il risultato più probabile sia che la Fed agisca in modo ‘misurato’, con rialzi di 25 punti base”.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Finanza e Sistema Bancario, Stati Uniti

Usa. Gen22. Consumer Price Index +7.5%. Biden in Nome di Dio vattene.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-02-10.

2022-02-10__ US CPI 000

                         In Sintesi.

«Over the last 12 months, the all items index increased 7.5 percent»

«The all items index rose 7.5 percent for the 12 months ending January, the largest 12-month increase since the period ending February 1982»

«The energy index rose 27.0 percent over the last year, and the food index increased 7.0 percent»

«The food index increased 0.9 percent in January»

«The index for cereals and bakery products increased the most, rising 1.8 percent over the month»

«The index for other food at home increased 1.6 percent in January»

«The food at home index rose 7.4 percent over the last 12 months»

«By far the largest increase was that of the index for meats, poultry, fish, and eggs, which rose 12.2 percent over the year»

«The index for limited service meals rose 8.0 percent over the last 12 months, and the index for full service meals rose 7.1 percent»

«The energy index rose 27.0 percent over the past 12 months with all major energy component indexes increasing»

«The gasoline index rose 40.0 percent over the last year»

«The index for natural gas rose 23.9 percent over the last 12 months»

«The index for electricity rose 10.7 percent»

«Major contributors to this increase include shelter (+4.4 percent) and used cars and trucks (+40.5 percent)»

2022-02-10__ US CPI 001

* * * * * * *

Questo è semplicemente il risultato della incompetente gestione della Harris-Biden Administration e della Fed, che languno inerti incapaci di alcunché.

Questi rincari dei prezzi al consumo si ripercuoteranno su quelli alla produzione, generando così un malvagio circolo vizioso inflattivo. L’epidemia non ci entra proprio nulla.

Sarebbe anche l’ora che Joe Biden smettesse di giocare con i soldatini di piombo e pensasse maggiormente a sanare questa situazione da catastrofe.

Biden, in Nome di Dio, vattene!

* * * * * * *


US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Consumer Price Index – January 2022

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increased 0.6 percent in January on a seasonally adjusted basis, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Over the last 12 months, the all items index increased 7.5 percent before seasonal adjustment.

Increases in the indexes for food, electricity, and shelter were the largest contributors to the seasonally adjusted all items increase. The food index rose 0.9 percent in January following a 0.5-percent increase in December. The energy index also increased 0.9 percent over the month, with an increase in the electricity index being partially offset by declines in the gasoline index and the natural gas index.

The index for all items less food and energy rose 0.6 percent in January, the same increase as in December. This was the seventh time in the last 10 months it has increased at least 0.5 percent. Along with the index for shelter, the indexes for household furnishings and operations, used cars and trucks, medical care, and apparel were among many indexes that increased over the month. 

The all items index rose 7.5 percent for the 12 months ending January, the largest 12-month increase since the period ending February 1982. The all items less food and energy index rose 6.0 percent, the largest 12-month change since the period ending August 1982. The energy index rose 27.0 percent over the last year, and the food index increased 7.0 percent.

                         Food.

The food index increased 0.9 percent in January. The food at home index increased 1.0 percent over the month after rising 0.4 percent in December. Five of the six major grocery store food group indexes increased in January. The index for cereals and bakery products increased the most, rising 1.8 percent over the month. The index for other food at home increased 1.6 percent in January, while the index for dairy and related products rose 1.1 percent. The fruits and vegetables index rose 0.9 percent over the month, and the meats, poultry, fish, and eggs index increased 0.3 percent. The only grocery store group index not to increase in January was the index for nonalcoholic beverages, which was unchanged.

The food away from home index rose 0.7 percent in January following an increase of 0.6 percent in December. The index for full service meals and the index for limited service meals both also rose 0.7 percent over the month.

The food at home index rose 7.4 percent over the last 12 months. All of the six major grocery store food group indexes increased over the period. By far the largest increase was that of the index for meats, poultry, fish, and eggs, which rose 12.2 percent over the year. The index for dairy and related products increased 3.1 percent, the smallest 12-month increase among the groups. 

The index for food away from home rose 6.4 percent over the last year, the largest 12-month increase since January 1982. The index for limited service meals rose 8.0 percent over the last 12 months, and the index for full service meals rose 7.1 percent. The index for food at employee sites and schools, in contrast, declined 46.9 percent over the past 12 months, reflecting widespread free lunch programs.

                         Energy.

The energy index increased 0.9 percent in January. The electricity index rose sharply in January, increasing 4.2 percent. The gasoline index fell 0.8 percent in January after rising rapidly in the autumn of 2021. (Before seasonal adjustment, gasoline prices rose 0.1 percent in January.) The index for natural gas also declined in January, falling 0.5 percent after declining 0.3 percent in December.

The energy index rose 27.0 percent over the past 12 months with all major energy component indexes increasing. The gasoline index rose 40.0 percent over the last year, despite declining in January. The index for natural gas rose 23.9 percent over the last 12 months, and the index for electricity rose 10.7 percent.

                         All items less food and energy.

The index for all items less food and energy rose 0.6 percent in January, the same increase as December. The shelter index increased 0.3 percent in January as the rent index increased 0.5 percent and the owners’ equivalent rent index rose 0.4 percent. The index for household furnishings and operations rose 1.3 percent over the month following a 1.1-percent increase in December. The used cars and trucks index rose 1.5 percent in January, a deceleration from the 3.3-percent increase reported in December.

The medical care index rose 0.7 percent in January. The index for hospital services increased 0.5 percent and the index for prescription drugs rose 1.3 percent, while the index for physicians’ services declined 0.1 percent. Other indexes that rose in January include recreation (+0.9 percent), apparel (+1.1 percent), personal care (+1.0 percent), airline fares (+2.3 percent), and education (+0.2 percent).

Only a few indexes decreased in January; among those that did were lodging away from home (-3.9 percent) and wireless telephone services (-0.1 percent). The index for new vehicles was unchanged over the month.

The index for all items less food and energy rose 6.0 percent over the past 12 months. Major contributors to this increase include shelter (+4.4 percent) and used cars and trucks (+40.5 percent). However, the increase is broad-based, with virtually all component indexes showing increases over the past 12 months.

                         Not seasonally adjusted CPI measures.

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increased 7.5 percent over the last 12 months to an index level of 281.148 (1982-84=100). For the month, the index increased 0.8 percent prior to seasonal adjustment. 

The Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W) increased 8.2 percent over the last 12 months to an index level of 276.296 (1982-84=100). For the month, the index rose 0.9 percent prior to seasonal adjustment. 

The Chained Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (C-CPI-U) increased 7.1 percent over the last 12 months. For the month, the index increased 0.8 percent on a not seasonally adjusted basis. Please note that the indexes for the past 10 to 12 months are subject to revision.

* * * * * * *


Table 1. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U. S. city average, by expenditure category

Table 2. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U. S. city average, by detailed expenditure category

Table 3. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U. S. city average, special aggregate indexes

Table 4. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): Selected areas, all items index

Table 5. Chained Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (C-CPI-U) and the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U.S. city average, all items index

Table 6. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U.S. city average, by expenditure category, 1-month analysis table

Table 7. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U.S. city average, by expenditure category, 12-month analysis table

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Stati Uniti

Usa. Disoccupazione. Iniziale 286k, continua 1,635k. Una altra severa débâcle.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela

2022-01-21.

2022-01-21__ Usa 001

                         In sintesi.

– Initial jobless claims totaled 286,000 for the week ended Jan. 15, well above the 225,000 estimate

– Continuing claims also rose, jumping to 1.64 million

– California showed a sharp 6,075 jump in claims

– New York reported a slide of 14,011

– Total recipients of all unemployment compensation programs rose by 180,114 to 2.13 million

* * * * * * *

Il 13 gennaio il Ppi, Producer Price Index, valeva il +9.7%, anno su anno

Il 12 gennaio il Cpi, Core Consumer Price Index, valeva il +5.5%, anno su anno.

Biden. Commento della Casa Bianca ai dati sulla inflazione. – Fotocopia.

Usa. Dec21. Indice dei Prezzi al Consumo, CPI, +7.0% anno su anno. Inflazione davvero alta.

Dec21. Nonfarm Payroll precipita a 199,000. Attesi 400,000. Una débâcle.

Parafrasando Cromwell: ‘Biden, in nome di Dio,vattene!’

* * * * * * *


Jobless claims jump to 286,000, the highest level since October.

– Initial jobless claims totaled 286,000 for the week ended Jan. 15, well above the 225,000 estimate.

– Continuing claims also rose, jumping to 1.64 million.

– The Philadelphia Fed manufacturing index was higher than expected, though the future prices paid index, an inflation gauge, hit its highest level since August 1988.

* * * * * * *

Jobless claims took an unexpected turn higher last week in a potential sign that the wintertime omicron surge was hitting the employment picture.

Initial filings for the week ended Jan. 15 totaled 286,000, well above the Dow Jones estimate of 225,000 and a substantial gain from the previous week’s 231,000.

The total was the highest since the week of Oct. 16, 2021, and marks a reversal after claims just a few weeks ago hit their lowest level in more than 50 years.

                         Initial claims for unemployment insurance.

“Omicron has put a wrench in where we stand on the labor market front, but with hiring challenges, employers are likely trying to hold onto their workforce,” said Mike Loewengart, managing director of investment strategy at E-Trade. “So this could be a short-term surge in jobless claims.”

Continuing claims, which run a week behind the headline data, also shot up, rising 84,000 to 1.64 million. One bright spot in the data showed that the four-week moving average for continuing claims, which irons out weekly volatility, declined by 55,250 to 1.664 million, the lowest since the week ended April 27, 2019.

California showed a sharp 6,075 jump in claims, while New York reported a slide of 14,011, according to unadjusted data.

                         Continuing claims for unemployment insurance.

Total recipients of all unemployment compensation programs rose by 180,114 to 2.13 million, according to data through Jan. 1.

Jobless claims are seen as a leading real-time gauge of the employment picture, which has brightened in some respects but is still beset by multiple trouble spots.

The unemployment rate has fallen to 3.9% after a record year of nonfarm payrolls growth. Still, the total employment level remains 2.9 million below where it was in February 2020, just before the pandemic declaration.

Labor force participation remains well below pre-pandemic levels, with the current 61.9% rate 1.5 percentage points below the pre-Covid level. The labor force has contracted by nearly 2.3 million during the period.

A separate economic report Thursday morning showed that manufacturing activity expanded faster than expected in the Philadelphia area.

The Philadelphia Federal Reserve’s outlook survey registered a reading of 23.2, a measure of the percentage point difference between companies reporting expansion versus contraction. The estimate had been for 18.5. Just 16% of the companies surveyed said they expect decreases in activity, with gains coming in new orders and future shipments.

The future employment index stumbled 19 points to 38.4, but that still reflects expectations of employment growth.

Inflation, however, remains an issue. The future prices paid index surged 23 points to 76.4, its highest level since August 1988.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Economia e Produzione Industriale, Stati Uniti

USA. Nov21. Sorella miseria e comare fame portano il Producer Price Index a +9.6%.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-12-15.

2021-12-15__ USA PPI 001

Il PCI, indice dei Prezzi al Consumo, a Nov21 valeva 6.8%.

Il PEC, deflatore PCE, a Nov21 valeva 5.0%. [Lo usa la Fed]

L’Indice dei Prezzi alla Importazione valeva 10.2%.

College. Il 78% degli studenti deve scegliere se mangiare o pagare la università.

America. Nov21. Indice dei Prezzi al Consumo +6.8%. Nel Dec20 valeva +1.4%. Carne + 20.9%.

* * * * * * *

Già questi macrodati ricordano strettamente la lista degli annunci funebri.

A Gen21 il PPI, Producer Price Index, valeva 1.7%, ma all’epoca c’era una altra Amministrazione. Poi è subentrata la Harris-Biden Administration.

Gelido il commento della Cnbc.

Wholesale prices measure rose 9.6% in November from a year ago, the fastest pace on record

«Wholesale prices rose 9.6% from a year ago, the highest level going back to November 2010.

The pace was even faster than the 9.2% estimate.

The core producer price index increased at a 6.9% pace, a bit slower than estimates but still the fastest ever. ….

The producer price index for final demand increased 9.6% over the previous 12 months after rising another 0.8% in November. Economists had been looking for an annual gain of 9.2%, according to FactSet.

Excluding food, energy and trade services prices rose 0.7% for the month, putting core PPI at 6.9%, also the largest gain on record. Estimates were for respective gains of 0.4% and 7.2%, meaning the monthly gain was faster than estimates but the year-over-year measure was a bit slower.

The Labor Department’s record keeping for the headline number goes back to November 2010, while the core calculation dates to August 2014.

Those numbers come with headline consumer prices running at their fastest pace in nearly 40 years and core inflation the hottest in about 30 years ….»

* * *

La Harris-Biden Administration e la Fed languono imbelli ed impotenti nel gestire questo immane massacro che loro stesse hanno provocato.

La stagflazione è un mostro spietato e l’inflazione è il suo braccio esecutivo.

Che il 78 percento degli studenti universitari debba scegliere se mangiare oppure pagare le tasse è un dato che grida vendetta.

Le automobili elettriche non sono commestibili, così come non sono mangiabili le trasgressioni degeneri.

* * * * * * *

«the final demand index rose 9.6 percent for the 12 months ended in November»

«For the 12 months ended in November, prices for final demand less foods, energy, and trade services increased 6.9 percent »

«the index for unprocessed goods increased 4.8 percent»

«For the 12 months ended in November, the index for processed goods for intermediate demand advanced 26.5 percent»

 «Over 80 percent of the November advance can be traced to prices for unprocessed energy materials, which moved up 8.7 percent»

«In November, nearly two-thirds of the rise in prices for unprocessed goods for intermediate demand can be attributed to a 14.3-percent increase in the index for natural gas»

« the index for unprocessed goods for intermediate demand jumped 52.5 percent»

«nearly two-thirds of the rise in prices for unprocessed goods for intermediate demand can be attributed to a 14.3-percent increase in the index for natural gas»

«index for services for intermediate demand advanced 8.1 percent»

«rise in the index for services for intermediate demand can be traced to a 6.1-percent advance in prices for securities brokerage, dealing, investment advice, and related services»

«prices for stage 4 intermediate demand rose 12.9 percent»

«For the 12 months ended in November, prices for stage 3 intermediate demand jumped 20.6 percent»

«prices for stage 2 intermediate demand rose 28.1 percent»

«For the 12 months ended in November, prices for stage 1 intermediate demand jumped 20.8 percent»

* * * * * * *


US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Producer Price Indexes – November 2021

The Producer Price Index for final demand increased 0.8 percent in November, seasonally adjusted, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Final demand prices moved up 0.6 percent in each of the 3 prior months. (See table A.) On an unadjusted basis, the final demand index rose 9.6 percent for the 12 months ended in November, the largest advance since 12-month data were first calculated in November 2010.

In November, the index for final demand services rose 0.7 percent and prices for final demand goods increased 1.2 percent.

The index for final demand less foods, energy, and trade services moved up 0.7 percent in November, the largest rise since climbing 0.8 percent in July. For the 12 months ended in November, prices for final demand less foods, energy, and trade services increased 6.9 percent, the largest advance since 12-month data were first calculated in August 2014.

                         Final Demand.

Final demand services: The index for final demand services rose 0.7 percent in November, the eleventh consecutive advance. Over half of the broad-based increase in November can be traced to prices for final demand services less trade, transportation, and warehousing, which climbed 0.6 percent. The indexes for final demand trade services and for final demand transportation and warehousing services also moved higher, rising 0.6 percent and 1.9 percent, respectively. (Trade indexes measure changes in margins received by wholesalers and retailers.)

Product detail: Leading the November increase in the index for final demand services, prices for portfolio management advanced 2.9 percent. The indexes for guestroom rental; securities brokerage, dealing, investment advice, and related services; fuels and lubricants retailing; airline passenger services; and transportation of freight and mail also moved higher. In contrast, margins for chemicals and allied products wholesaling fell 1.3 percent. The indexes for furnishings wholesaling and for bundled wired telecommunications access services also declined. (See table 2.)

Final demand goods: The index for final demand goods rose 1.2 percent in November following a 1.3-percent increase in October. In November, advances were broad based. Prices for final demand goods less foods and energy climbed 0.8 percent, the index for final demand energy jumped 2.6 percent, and prices for final demand foods moved up 1.2 percent.

Product detail: Within final demand goods in November, prices for iron and steel scrap rose 10.7 percent. The indexes for gasoline, fresh fruits and melons, fresh and dry vegetables, industrial chemicals, and jet fuel also moved higher. Conversely, prices for diesel fuel decreased 2.6 percent. The indexes for processed young chickens and for light motor trucks also fell.

                         Intermediate Demand by Commodity Type.

Within intermediate demand in November, prices for processed goods moved up 1.5 percent, the index for unprocessed goods increased 4.8 percent, and prices for services advanced 0.6 percent. (See tables B and C.)

Processed goods for intermediate demand: The index for processed goods for intermediate demand advanced 1.5 percent in November after rising 2.4 percent in October. Over half of the November increase can be attributed to prices for processed materials less foods and energy, which moved up 1.2 percent. The index for processed energy goods rose 3.6 percent. In contrast, prices for processed foods and feeds fell 0.2 percent. For the 12 months ended in November, the index for processed goods for intermediate demand advanced 26.5 percent, the largest 12-month increase since jumping 28.9 percent in December 1974.

Product detail: A major factor in the increase in prices for processed goods for intermediate demand was the index for industrial chemicals, which rose 2.5 percent in November. Prices for utility natural gas, gasoline, electric power, fabricated structural metal products, and hot rolled steel sheet and strip also moved higher. Conversely, the index for confectionery materials fell 6.2 percent. Prices for diesel fuel and for primary nonferrous metals also decreased.

Unprocessed goods for intermediate demand: The index for unprocessed goods for intermediate demand rose 4.8 percent in November, the eighth consecutive increase. Over 80 percent of the November advance can be traced to prices for unprocessed energy materials, which moved up 8.7 percent. The index for unprocessed nonfood materials less energy increased 4.5 percent. In contrast, prices for unprocessed foodstuffs and feedstuffs fell 0.7 percent. For the 12 months ended in November, the index for unprocessed goods for intermediate demand jumped 52.5 percent.

Product detail: In November, nearly two-thirds of the rise in prices for unprocessed goods for intermediate demand can be attributed to a 14.3-percent increase in the index for natural gas. Prices for crude petroleum, grains, iron and steel, nonferrous metal ores, and fresh fruits and melons also moved higher. Conversely, the index for raw milk decreased 10.3 percent. Prices for slaughter poultry and for hides and skins also declined.

Services for intermediate demand: The index for services for intermediate demand advanced 0.6 percent in November after inching up 0.1 percent in October. Most of the increase in November can be attributed to a 0.8-percent rise in prices for services less trade, transportation, and warehousing for intermediate demand. The index for transportation and warehousing services for intermediate demand climbed 0.7 percent, while margins for trade services for intermediate demand were unchanged. For the 12 months ended in November, the index for services for intermediate demand advanced 8.1 percent.

Product detail: Over a quarter of the November rise in the index for services for intermediate demand can be traced to a 6.1-percent advance in prices for securities brokerage, dealing, investment advice, and related services. The indexes for portfolio management, television advertising time sales, transportation of freight and mail, temporary help services, and fuels and lubricants retailing also increased. In contrast, margins for chemicals and allied products wholesaling fell 1.3 percent. The indexes for arrangement of freight and cargo transportation and for business loans (partial) also declined.

                         Intermediate Demand by Production Flow.

Stage 4 intermediate demand: The index for stage 4 intermediate demand increased 1.0 percent in November, the largest rise since moving up 1.3 percent in June. In November, prices for total goods inputs to stage 4 intermediate demand advanced 1.4 percent, and the index for total services inputs climbed 0.7 percent. (See table D.) Increases in prices for fabricated structural metal products; securities brokerage, dealing, investment advice, and related services; portfolio management; utility natural gas; gasoline; and electric power outweighed decreases in the indexes for furnishings wholesaling, chemicals and allied products wholesaling, and diesel fuel. For the 12 months ended in November, prices for stage 4 intermediate demand rose 12.9 percent, the largest advance since 12-month data were first calculated in November 2010.

Stage 3 intermediate demand: The index for stage 3 intermediate demand moved up 0.6 percent in November after rising 1.1 percent in both October and September. In November, prices for total goods inputs to stage 3 intermediate demand increased 0.7 percent, and the index for total services inputs advanced 0.5 percent. Rising prices for grains, television advertising time sales, jet fuel, asphalt, hot rolled steel sheet and strip, and utility natural gas outweighed declines in the indexes for raw milk, slaughter poultry, and arrangement of freight and cargo transportation. For the 12 months ended in November, prices for stage 3 intermediate demand jumped 20.6 percent.

Stage 2 intermediate demand: The index for stage 2 intermediate demand advanced 2.5 percent in November, the eighth consecutive increase. In November, prices for total goods inputs to stage 2 intermediate demand climbed 4.5 percent, and the index for total services inputs moved up 0.6 percent. Increases in the indexes for natural gas, crude petroleum, industrial chemicals, iron and steel scrap, fuels and lubricants retailing, and utility natural gas outweighed falling prices for liquefied petroleum gas, arrangement of freight and cargo transportation, and primary nonferrous metals. For the 12 months ended in November, prices for stage 2 intermediate demand rose 28.1 percent, the largest advance since 12-month data were first calculated in November 2010.

Stage 1 intermediate demand: Prices for stage 1 intermediate demand moved up 1.5 percent in November, the largest increase since a 1.5-percent advance in June. In November, the index for total goods inputs to stage 1 intermediate demand rose 2.0 percent, and prices for total services inputs climbed 0.9 percent. Advances in prices for utility natural gas; securities brokerage, dealing, investment advice, and related services; industrial chemicals; grains; iron and steel scrap; and guestroom rental outweighed decreasing indexes for diesel fuel; hardware, building materials, and supplies retailing; and building materials, paint, and hardware wholesaling. For the 12 months ended in November, prices for stage 1 intermediate demand jumped 20.8 percent.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Economia e Produzione Industriale, Stati Uniti

USA. Oct21. Rapporto Jolt. 11 milioni di posti scoperti.- Altra débâcle per Joe Biden.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-12-10.

2021-12-10__ Jolt 001

«What is JOLTS?

The Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) is conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor. The program involves the monthly collection, processing, and dissemination of job openings and labor turnover data. The data, collected from sampled establishments on a voluntary basis, include employment, job openings, hires, quits, layoffs and discharges, and other separations.

The number of unfilled jobs—used to calculate the job openings rate—is an important measure of the unmet demand for labor. With that statistic, it is possible to paint a more complete picture of the U.S. labor market than by looking solely at the unemployment rate, a measure of the excess supply of labor.

Information on labor turnover is valuable in the proper analysis and interpretation of labor market developments and as a complement to the unemployment rate.» [U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics]

Attenzione! Mentre il numero dei disoccupati, degli impiegati o dei riceventi sussidi sono macrodati statici, relativi al momento del rilevamento, i dati Jolt ne esaminano la struttura dinamica.

* * * * * * *

«The number of job openings increased to 11.0 million on the last business day of October»

«On the last business day of October, the number of job openings increased to 11.0 million (+431,000)»

«In October, the number of hires was little changed at 6.5 million. The hires rate was unchanged at 4. percent»

«Quits are generally voluntary separations initiated by the employee»

«In October, the number of total separations edged down to 5.9 million (-255,000)»

«The number of quits decreased in October to 4.2 million (-205,000). The quits rate decreased to 2.8 percent»

«Over the 12 months ending in October 2021, hires totaled 73.8 million and separations totaled 68.1 million, yielding a net employment gain of 5.7 million»

* * * * * * *

«The number of job openings increased to 11.0 million on the last business day of October»

“il numero di offerte di lavoro è aumentato a 11,0 milioni (+431.000)”

In altri termini, il sistema produttivo offre 11 milioni di posti di lavoro, che però restano scoperti per mancanza di figure professionali adeguate.

Quello che avrebbe potuto essere un ottimo macrodato diventa invece motivo di disillusione.

«The sheer number of jobs going begging in the US has put workers in the driver’s seat for the first time in decades, with many businesses boosting wages and sweetening benefits to lure scarce job hunters ….

But the financial cushion from federal coronavirus-pandemic aid that allowed workers to be more choosy about what position they take is dwindling after federal unemployment benefits expired in September ….

The US economy is still roughly four million jobs shy of regaining its pre-pandemic level from February 2020

A number of factors are believed to be contributing to the current shortfall in available workers, from fear of contracting COVID-19, to older workers opting to take early retirement, to Americans simply deciding to stop working for someone else and opening their own businesses instead.» [Fonte]

Questa è una altra débâcle per Joe Biden.

* * * * * * *


US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Job openings and labor turnover – October 2021

The number of job openings increased to 11.0 million on the last business day of October, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Hires were little changed at 6.5 million and total separations edged down to 5.9 million. Within separations, the quits rate decreased to 2.8 percent following a series high in September. The layoffs and discharges rate was unchanged at 0.9 percent. This release includes estimates of the number and rate of job openings, hires, and separations for the total nonfarm sector, by industry, by four geographic regions, and by establishment size class.

                         Job Openings.

On the last business day of October, the number of job openings increased to 11.0 million (+431,000). The job openings rate was little changed at 6.9 percent. Job openings increased in several industries with the largest increases in accommodation and food services (+254,000); nondurable goods manufacturing (+45,000); and educational services (+42,000). Job openings decreased in state and local government, excluding education (-115,000). The number of job openings increased in the South region. (See table 1.)

                         Hires.

In October, the number of hires was little changed at 6.5 million. The hires rate was unchanged at 4. percent. Hires decreased in finance and insurance (-96,000). Hires increased in educational services (+54,000) and in state and local government education (+37,000). The number of hires was little changed in all four regions. (See table 2.)

                         Separations.

Total separations includes quits, layoffs and discharges, and other separations. Quits are generally voluntary separations initiated by the employee. Therefore, the quits rate can serve as a measure of workers’ willingness or ability to leave jobs. Layoffs and discharges are involuntary separations initiated by the employer. Other separations includes separations due to retirement, death, disability, and transfers to other locations of the same firm.

In October, the number of total separations edged down to 5.9 million (-255,000). The total separations rate was little changed at 4.0 percent. Total separations decreased in finance and insurance (-88,000) and in transportation, warehousing, and utilities (-64,000). Total separations increased in state and local government, excluding education (+28,000). Total separations were little changed in all four regions. (See table 3.)

The number of quits decreased in October to 4.2 million (-205,000). The quits rate decreased to 2.8 percent. Quits decreased in several industries with the largest decreases in transportation, warehousing, and utilities (-57,000); finance and insurance (-45,000); and arts, entertainment, and recreation (-33,000). Quits increased in state and local government, excluding education (+21,000) and in mining and logging (+6,000). The number of quits was little changed in all four regions. (See table 4.)

In October, the number of layoffs and discharges was little changed at 1.4 million. The layoffs and discharges rate was unchanged at 0.9 percent. Layoffs and discharges were little changed in all industries and in all four regions. (See table 5.)

The number of other separations was little changed in October at 373,000. Other separations decreased in finance and insurance (-33,000). The number of other separations increased in state and local government, excluding education (+8,000). Other separations were little changed in all four regions. (See table 6.)

                         Net Change in Employment.

Large numbers of hires and separations occur every month throughout the business cycle. Net employment change results from the relationship between hires and separations. When the number of hires exceeds the number of separations, employment rises, even if the hires level is steady or declining. Conversely, when the number of hires is less than the number of separations, employment declines, even if the hires level is steady or rising.

Over the 12 months ending in October 2021, hires totaled 73.8 million and separations totaled 68.1 million, yielding a net employment gain of 5.7 million. These totals include workers who may have been hired and separated more than once during the year.

* * * * * * *

Table A. Job openings, hires, and total separations by industry, seasonally adjusted

Job Openings and Labor Turnover Technical Note

Table 1. Job openings levels and rates by industry and region, seasonally adjusted

Table 2. Hires levels and rates by industry and region, seasonally adjusted

Table 3. Total separations levels and rates by industry and region, seasonally adjusted

Table 4. Quits levels and rates by industry and region, seasonally adjusted

Table 5. Layoffs and discharges levels and rates by industry and region, seasonally adjusted

Table 6. Other separations levels and rates by industry and region, seasonally adjusted

Table 7. Job openings levels and rates by industry and region, not seasonally adjusted

Table 8. Hires levels and rates by industry and region, not seasonally adjusted

Table 9. Total separations levels and rates by industry and region, not seasonally adjusted

Table 10. Quits levels and rates by industry and region, not seasonally adjusted

Table 11. Layoffs and discharges levels and rates by industry and region, not seasonally adjusted

Table 12. Other separations levels and rates by industry and region, not seasonally adjusted

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Stati Uniti

US. Media liberal vorrebbero convincere che i 3$ al gallone siano un affarone.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-12-07.

2021-11-25__ US Gasoline 001

Di questi tempi i media liberal hanno il loro gran daffare a cercare di addolcire l’amara pozione della stagflazione.

L’articolo riportato, tratto dal The Washington Post, ce la mette tutta per cercare di convincerci che il costo di 3 dollari al gallone di benzina alla pompa sono un affarone.

* * * * * * *

«$3-a-gallon gasoline isn’t as painful as it used to be»

«Given oil’s sharp drop, gasoline prices should soon fall somewhat»

«In any case, this most recent bout of pain at the pump was never really very painful to begin with»

«Any price per gallon beginning with a “3” tends to provoke panic»

«→→ recent gasoline prices don’t look particularly high ←←»

«Yes, they’re a lot higher than last year. But that’s no surprise»

«And gasoline’s share of the American wallet is lower than it has been»

«consider the ubiquitous Toyota RAV4 Crossover SUV»

«The base 2021 model runs about $27,500 and is rated at just more than 31 miles to the gallon»

«Five years ago, the base 2016 model cost about $24,000 and scored about 26 miles to the gallon»

«So even though the sticker price was lower and gasoline was cheaper by about 25%, the combination of better mileage and higher wages mean a driver works fewer hours to cover the cost of buying and running a RAV4 today»

«At 59%, November’s year-over-year price increase is the sharpest in monthly data going back to the early 1990s»

* * * * * * *

Usa. Il 58% degli Elettori ritiene che i media siano ‘nemici del popolo’.

Tutti gli eventi possono essere letti sotto diverse ottiche, ciascuna delle quali individua una qualche verità, sia pur piccola.

Dubitiamo profondamente che le argomentazioni portate avanti dal The Washington Post riescano a convincere gli americani.

Ma tutto questo contorsionismo logico dimostra quanto il costo del carburante sia una pulpite purulenta per i liberal democratici.

Una seconda considerazione viene naturale.

Più i media liberal tentato di trovare pretestuose giustificazioni alla presente crisi, da loro innescata, e più i lettori perdono fiducia in essi. Stanno alacremente lavorando per i Repubblicani: nessuno si azzardi a fermarli!

* * * * * * *


$3-a-Gallon Gasoline Isn’t as Painful as It Used to Be. – The Washington Post.

Given oil’s sharp drop, gasoline prices should soon fall somewhat. In any case, this most recent bout of pain at the pump was never really very painful to begin with.

Any price per gallon beginning with a “3” tends to provoke panic. But on a number of relative measures, recent gasoline prices don’t look particularly high. In this chart they are adjusted for inflation, for example. Yes, they’re a lot higher than last year. But that’s no surprise. 

And gasoline’s share of the American wallet is lower than it has been.

Another way of looking at this is to tweak the familiar metric of miles-per-hour to miles-per-hour-worked: How much driving distance does an average hour of labor buy at the prevailing pump price?

For October, I calculate an hour’s work was enough to buy 7.3 gallons, on average.(1) The latest data for the U.S. vehicle fleet’s average fuel economy from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics are for 2019; I roll these forward through 2021. Meanwhile, the latest data on average fuel economy for new vehicles from the Environmental Protection Agency are for 2020, and I also roll these forward. Using these, we can get a crude measure of just how far the average worker can drive on an hour’s labor, either in their trusty old workhorse or a brand new car. Again, recent history looks similar to the picture before the pandemic.

To make that slightly less abstract, consider the ubiquitous Toyota RAV4 Crossover SUV. The base 2021 model runs about $27,500 and is rated at just more than 31 miles to the gallon.(2)Five years ago, the base 2016 model cost about $24,000 and scored about 26 miles to the gallon. So even though the sticker price was lower and gasoline was cheaper by about 25%, the combination of better mileage and higher wages mean a driver works fewer hours to cover the cost of buying and running a RAV4 today, on average, than back then. (3)

Averages obscure harsher realities away from the mean, of course. And although the recent data don’t look out of the ordinary in terms of their level, they were nearing more dangerous territory (as the charts show). At 59%, November’s year-over-year price increase is the sharpest in monthly data going back to the early 1990s. Yes, that reflects the base effect of a year of lockdowns, but it’s for a product of almost mystical importance to the U.S. consumer, who is reminded of its cost regularly.

The desire to blunt that momentum, and signal concern for those harsher realities, figured large in President Joe Biden’s decision to release oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. And he was surely mindful of the inverse relationship between gasoline prices and the prospects for his green-tinged budget package sitting in the Senate. Even though the numbers don’t reveal an actual emergency, their speed and direction portended real trouble. 

(1) I calculate this by adjusting average hourly wages from the Bureau of Labor Statistics for the all-in average personal tax rate for a one-earner married couple with no children, as calculated by the OECD. The latest data for the latter are from 2020, so I roll that figure forward for 2021, then divide the resulting net hourly wage by the average retail gasoline price as published by the Energy Information Administration.

(2) This assumes 55% city driving and 45% highway driving.

(3) Assuming annual driving of 13,000 miles, the 2016 model required1,254 hours of labor to cover its purchase and first year of fuel costs. The 2021 model requires less than 1,186. Go back a decade, and you needed 1,301 hours to buy and run the same (but far less efficient) SUV.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Stati Uniti

Usa. Midterm. Nei sondaggi i Repubblicani superano i Democratici per 13 punti.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-11-24.

Giulio Romano. Palazzo Gonzaga. Sala dei giganti. 004

«Voters now favor GOP by 13 points for House, Senate»

«With the midterms elections now less than a year away, Republicans have a double-digit lead in their bid to recapture control of Congress»

«→→ if the elections for Congress were held today, 51% of Likely U.S. Voters would vote for the Republican candidate, while 38% would vote for the Democrat ←»

«In January 2018, before voters handed Democrats their first House majority in eight years, Democrats held an eight-point advantage (45% to 37%) in the generic ballot question»

«The 13-point edge for Republicans in the latest poll is larger than Democrats enjoyed at any time during the 2018 midterm campaign»

«While 89% of Republican voters say they would vote for their own party’s candidate, only 77% of Democrats would vote for the Democratic candidate»

«Among voters not affiliated with either major party, 48% would vote Republican and 26% would vote Democrats»

«Fifty-six percent (56%) of whites, 30% of black voters and 47% of other minorities would vote Republican if the election were held today»

«Voters under 40 favor Democrats by a margin of 49% to 40%, but majorities of older voters – 56% of those ages 40-64 and 57% of those 65 and older – would vote Republican»

«The sagging popularity of President Joe Biden has political consequences, as more than half of voters say they would vote against Biden-endorsed candidates in their state»

* * * * * * *

Virtualmente tutti i sondaggi sull’esito di midterm sono concordi nel ritenere che il partito repubblicano abbia ottime possibilità di aggiudicarsi sia il Congresso sia il Senato. Ricordiamo però che a midterm manca ancora un anno.

Joe Biden è il migliore alleato di Mr Trump, ma anche l’inflazione è fattore di massimo pungolo. La gente è sempre più inferocita.

* * * * * * *


Generic Congressional Ballot. Voters Now Favor GOP By 13 Points for House, Senate.

With the midterms elections now less than a year away, Republicans have a double-digit lead in their bid to recapture control of Congress.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that, if the elections for Congress were held today, 51% of Likely U.S. Voters would vote for the Republican candidate, while 38% would vote for the Democrat. Just three percent (3%) would vote for some other candidate, but another eight percent (8%) are not sure.

In January 2018, before voters handed Democrats their first House majority in eight years, Democrats held an eight-point advantage (45% to 37%) in the generic ballot question. That margin narrowed as the November 2018 midterms neared, and was a statistical dead heat – Republicans 46%, Democrats 45% – in the final poll before Democrats won a slim House majority while Republicans maintained control of the Senate.

The 13-point edge for Republicans in the latest poll is larger than Democrats enjoyed at any time during the 2018 midterm campaign, due both to greater GOP partisan intensity and a wide advantage among independents. While 89% of Republican voters say they would vote for their own party’s candidate, only 77% of Democrats would vote for the Democratic candidate. Among voters not affiliated with either major party, 48% would vote Republican and 26% would vote Democrats, with another 17% undecided.

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it’s in the news, it’s in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 2,500 U.S. Likely Voters was conducted on November 8-11, 2021 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/-2 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Fifty-six percent (56%) of whites, 30% of black voters and 47% of other minorities would vote Republican if the election were held today. Sixty-three percent (63%) of black voters, 33% of whites and 38% of other minorities would vote Democrat.

Slightly more women voters than men favor Republican control of Congress.

Voters under 40 favor Democrats by a margin of 49% to 40%, but majorities of older voters – 56% of those ages 40-64 and 57% of those 65 and older – would vote Republican.

Breaking down the electorate by income brackets, Republicans enjoy their largest advantage – 55% to 37% – among voters earning between $50,000 and $100,000 a year.

The Republican advantage is smaller among voters who attended college, and Democrats have a narrow edge – 46% to 44% – among those with postgraduate degrees.

Entrepreneurs and retirees strongly favor the GOP, and most private sector workers would vote Republican, while government employees slightly favor Democrats.

Voters increasingly distrust reporting about politics, and most think the media are less aggressive in questioning President Joe Biden than they were with former President Donald Trump.

The sagging popularity of President Joe Biden has political consequences, as more than half of voters say they would vote against Biden-endorsed candidates in their state. An endorsement by former President Donald Trump would be more valuable, particularly with independent voters.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Economia e Produzione Industriale, Stati Uniti

Usa. Sept21. Rapporto Jolt. – Altra débâcle per Joe Biden.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-11-15.

2021-11-15__ Lavori Jolt 001

«What is JOLTS?

The Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) is conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor. The program involves the monthly collection, processing, and dissemination of job openings and labor turnover data. The data, collected from sampled establishments on a voluntary basis, include employment, job openings, hires, quits, layoffs and discharges, and other separations.

The number of unfilled jobs—used to calculate the job openings rate—is an important measure of the unmet demand for labor. With that statistic, it is possible to paint a more complete picture of the U.S. labor market than by looking solely at the unemployment rate, a measure of the excess supply of labor.

Information on labor turnover is valuable in the proper analysis and interpretation of labor market developments and as a complement to the unemployment rate.» [U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics]

Attenzione! Mentre il numero dei disoccupati, degli impiegati o dei riceventi sussidi sono macrodati statici, relativi al momento del rilevamento, i dati Jolt ne esaminano la struttura dinamica.

* * * * * * *

2021-11-15__ Lavori Jolt 002

«The number of job openings was little changed at 10.4 million on the last business day of September»

«Hires and total separations were little changed at 6.5 million and 6.2 million, respectively»

«Within separations, the quits level and rate increased to a series high of 4.4 million and 3.0 percent, respectively»

«The layoffs and discharges rate was unchanged at 0.9 percent»

«the number and rate of job openings were little changed at 10.4 million and 6.6 percent, respectively»

«the number and rate of hires were little changed at 6.5 million and 4.4 percent, respectively»

«Quits are generally voluntary separations initiated by the employee. Therefore, the quits rate can serve as a measure of workers’ willingness or ability to leave jobs. Layoffs and discharges are involuntary separations initiated by the employer»

«In September, the number and rate of total separations were little changed at 6.2 million and 4.2 percent, respectively»

«the number of layoffs and discharges was little changed at 1.4 million»

«Large numbers of hires and separations occur every month throughout the business cycle»

«Over the 12 months ending in September 2021, hires totaled 73.3 million and separations totaled 67.7 million, yielding a net employment gain of 5.6 million»

* * * * * * *

I nuovi lavori Jolt a settembre sono stati 10.438 milioni, in calo rispetto ai 10.629 del mese di agosto.

Gran brutto risultato per la Harris-Biden Administration.

Gli Stati Uniti sono in piena stagflazione.

Usa. Oct21. PCI, Indice dei Prezzi al Consumo, +6.2% anno su anno.

* * * * * * *


U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey News Release – September 2021.

The number of job openings was little changed at 10.4 million on the last business day of September, the  U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Hires and total separations were little changed at 6.5 million and 6.2 million, respectively. Within separations, the quits level and rate increased to a series high of 4.4 million and 3.0 percent, respectively. The layoffs and discharges rate was unchanged at 0.9 percent. This release includes estimates of the number and rate of job openings, hires, and separations for the total nonfarm sector, by industry, by four geographic regions, and by establishment size class.

                         Job Openings

On the last business day of September, the number and rate of job openings were little changed at 10.4 million and 6.6 percent, respectively. Job openings increased in health care and social assistance (+141,000); state and local government, excluding education (+114,000); wholesale trade (+51,000); and information (+51,000). Job openings decreased in state and local government education (-114,000); other services (-104,000); real estate and rental and leasing (-65,000); and educational services (-45,000). The number of job openings was little changed in all four regions. (See table 1.)

                         Hires

In September, the number and rate of hires were little changed at 6.5 million and 4.4 percent, respectively. Hires increased in health care and social assistance (+109,000) and finance and insurance (+60,000). Hires decreased in state and local government education (-92,000) and educational services (-89,000). The number of hires was little changed in all four regions. (See table 2.)

                         Separations

Total separations includes quits, layoffs and discharges, and other separations. Quits are generally voluntary separations initiated by the employee. Therefore, the quits rate can serve as a measure of workers’ willingness or ability to leave jobs. Layoffs and discharges are involuntary separations initiated by the employer. Other separations includes separations due to retirement, death, disability, and transfers to other locations of the same firm.

In September, the number and rate of total separations were little changed at 6.2 million and 4.2 percent, respectively. Total separations decreased in retail trade (-100,000). The total separations level increased in several industries with the largest increases in other services (+87,000); health care and social assistance (+86,000); and finance and insurance (+61,000). Total separations were little changed in all four regions. (See table 3.)

The number of quits increased in September to a series high of 4.4 million (+164,000). The quits rate also increased to a series high 3.0 percent. Quits increased in several industries with the largest increases in arts, entertainment, and recreation (+56,000); other services (+47,000); and state and local government education (+30,000). Quits decreased in wholesale trade (-30,000). The number of quits increased in the West region. (See table 4.)

In September, the number of layoffs and discharges was little changed at 1.4 million. The layoffs and discharges rate was unchanged at 0.9 percent. Layoffs and discharges were little changed in all industries and in all four regions. (See table 5.)

The number of other separations was little changed in September at 410,000. Other separations increased in finance and insurance (+41,000); state and local government education (+13,000); and other services (+12,000). Other separations were little changed in all four regions. (See table 6.)

                         Net Change in Employment

Large numbers of hires and separations occur every month throughout the business cycle. Net employment change results from the relationship between hires and separations. When the number of hires exceeds the number of separations, employment rises, even if the hires level is steady or declining. Conversely, when the number of hires is less than the number of separations, employment declines, even if the hires level is steady or rising.

Over the 12 months ending in September 2021, hires totaled 73.3 million and separations totaled 67.7 million, yielding a net employment gain of 5.6 million. These totals include workers who may have been hired and separated more than once during the year.

                         Establishment Size Class

In September, the job openings rate decreased in large establishments with 250-999 employees. The total separations rate increased in large establishments with 1,000-4,999 employees. For a more in-depth description of the JOLTS establishment size class estimates, please visit http://www.bls.gov/jlt/sizeclassmethodology.htm.