Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Germania. Sommovimenti di piazza per il caro-affitti.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-04-10.

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Dopo i Gilets Jaunes in Francia, anche i tedeschi sono scesi in piazza.

Per la verità son quattro anni che ogni lunedì gli abitanti di Dresden scendono in piazza per manifestare contro il Governo, ma siccome non sono liberal socialisti la stampa non li menziona: è come se non esistessero.

Adesso invece sono decine di migliaia di patrioti che manifestano contro il rincaro degli affitti, che hanno raggiunto prezzi da capogiro. Prezzi alti se si è tedeschi, che per gli immigrati ci sono prezzi di alto favore.

Il Governo della Große Koalition non sa che pesci prendere.

Dopo aver spolverato il gagliardetto della Stasi, il governo sta meditando sulla possibilità di requisire gli immobili sfitti.

«Far-right AfD party co-leader Alice Weidel criticized the Green party, saying their support for expropriations indicated that they were on their way to embracing full-blown communism»

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«Katja Kipping, head of Germany’s socialist Left party, said she not only supported expropriations, but went as far as saying the government should also be able to confiscate property from housing firms»

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«Markus Söder, the head of Bavaria’s conservative CSU party, told the Münchner Merkur media group that expropriations were “socialist ideas” that had no place in the public discourse»

Sono i problemi irrisolti che hanno alimentato la crescita dei populisti.

Sono le ingiustizie che fanno scendere in piazza la gente inferocita.

Fridays for Future announces ambitious climate goals for Germany

Le variazioni climatiche si apprezzano meglio dormendo sotto i ponti dell’Elba.

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German lawmakers bicker over expropriation to control ‘rental insanity’

German political leaders disagree on whether the government should tackle soaring rents in big cities by expropriating housing. One conservative politician says the proposal smacks of East Germany-style socialism.

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Germany’s political parties weighed in on the debate over rising rents on Sunday, a day after nationwide demonstrations against “rental insanity” triggered calls for expropriating housing from major rental companies.

Green party co-leader Robert Habeck told German newspaper Welt am Sonntag that it was conceivable to crack down on big housing firms that hold tracks of land inactive. If they don’t build new housing or refuse to sell the land back to the city, they can be expropriated, Habeck said.

Rents have been soaring in Germany’s biggest cities, but the problem has been particularly acute in Berlin, which has seen average rents double in the past decade. The capital is, however, far from the most expensive city in Germany. Rents in Munich, Frankfurt and Stuttgart as well as other smaller cities are still much dearer.

Habeck said Germany’s constitution permits expropriation through the power of eminent domain. “It would be absurd if we only used this to build new highways, but not to take action against the rampant housing shortage,” he added.

Katja Kipping, head of Germany’s socialist Left party, said she not only supported expropriations, but went as far as saying the government should also be able to confiscate property from housing firms.

‘Socialist ideas’

But Germany’s conservative parties were swift to condemn calls for expropriation.

Markus Söder, the head of Bavaria’s conservative CSU party, told the Münchner Merkur media group that expropriations were “socialist ideas” that had no place in the public discourse.

Free Democratic Party (FDP) leader Christian Lindner told the Rheinische Post newspaper that “only more apartments” and not “ideas from the GDR” — the former East Germany — would help solve the problem of rising rents. Expropriations would also harm private investments in housing, he added.

Far-right AfD party co-leader Alice Weidel criticized the Green party, saying their support for expropriations indicated that they were on their way to embracing full-blown communism.

While she said she understood public “anger” at rising rents, the head of center-left SPD, Andrea Nahles, told the Bild am Sonntag newspaper that she opposed expropriations because they would take years and wouldn’t help create new housing.

Petition to end high rents

Saturday’s protests saw organizers collect signatures for a petition calling on the local Berlin government to expropriate nearly 250,000 apartments from big rental companies.

Activists say the move would crack down on speculation by cutting rental companies to size and stripping them of the influence they wield on determining market prices.

But housing associations and developers disagree. They argue that expropriation won’t solve the problem and have pushed instead for more housing construction and, in particular, subsidized housing projects.

If the petition gathers 20,000 signatures, Berlin’s government would be required to consider the initiative.

If citizens disagree with the government’s initial response, they can force a referendum on the issue by gathering another 170,000 signatures by February 2020.

Annunci
Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Senza categoria, Unione Europea

Francia. Yellow vest e sondaggi elettorali in picchiata.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-11-25.

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Eurostat riporta come il reddito mediano netto dei francesi sia 1,719 euro al mese. Questo significa che la metà dei francesi deve vivere con meno di tale cifra: sono nella fascia alta dei redditi considerati essere poveri.

In pochi stati dell’Unione Europea la differenze di tenore di vita presenta differenze più stridenti di quelle che intercorrono tra la provincia rurale francese e le grandi città, quali Parigi, Marsiglia e Lione. Farebbe un grande errore chi visitasse la Francia limitandosi alle grandi città, peraltro assai decaduti nell’ultimo ventennio. Se però dovesse limitarsi alle metropoli, almeno vada a vedere le banlieue. I mercatini delle pulci ove si possono comprare delle scarpe usate e con la suola bucata per tre euro: ed il tragico è che di acquirenti ce ne sono, pensasi ed oculati.

«Anti-government protesters clashed with French police on the Champs-Elysees in Paris on Saturday, leaving the area cloaked in tear gas and smoke from fires on a fresh day of demonstrations against President Emmanuel Macron»

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«Demonstrators wearing the yellow, high-visibility vests that symbolise their movement threw projectiles at police preventing them from moving along the famed shopping avenue, which was decked out in twinkling Christmas lights»

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«They also built barricades in some spots, and tore down traffic lights and street signs, creating riotous scenes reminiscent of France’s 1968 civil unrest, or street insurrections in the mid-19th century immortalised in paintings and movies»

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«Police arrested 130 people, 69 of those in Paris, and 24 people were injured, five of them police officers including one who suffered burns to his groin»

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«Macron, targeted by protesters’ calls that he resign»

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«The violence was on a smaller scale than a week ago when the “yellow vest” movement»

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«We’re not here to beat up cops. We came because we want the government to hear us»

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Ma come può un Presidente dei ricchi stare a sentire i poveri ed i miseri?

Emmanuel Macron has spent €26,000 on makeup in his first three months as French president

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I sondaggi sono spietati.

A maggio 2018 REM, La République en Marche! il partito del Presidente Macron, godeva del 33% delle intenzioni di voto, mentre Rassemblement National, il partito di Mrs Marine Le Pen, arrivava al 12%.

Il 12 novembre, una settimana or sono, REM era crollato al 19% e RN era salito al 22%.

Rem avrebbe perso 14 punti percentuali e RN ne avrebbe guadagnato dieci.

Se è vero che Mr Macron sia stato eletto e terminerà, verosimilmente, il proprio mandato, sarebbe altrettanto vero ricordare come a maggio prossimo si voti per le elezioni europee ed, appresso, per le regionali francesi.

Nell’Unione Europea Mr Macron varrà per quanto varranno i diciotto eurodeputati che potrà eleggere: pochino per far sentir bene la propria voce.

Si consideri la fine che sta facendo Frau Merkel.

Challenges for new Franco-German eurozone plan

«With both Macron and Merkel losing support domestically, it is questionable whether their plans will succeed. Even more so, given the opposition by the Hanseatic states, the upcoming European elections and Italy’s political hooliganism.»

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Anche i poveri ed i miseri votano, caro Mr Macron.


France 24. 2018-11-25. ‘Yellow vest’ protesters clash with police on Champs-Elysées in Paris

Anti-government protesters clashed with French police on the Champs-Elysees in Paris on Saturday, leaving the area cloaked in tear gas and smoke from fires on a fresh day of demonstrations against President Emmanuel Macron.

Demonstrators wearing the yellow, high-visibility vests that symbolise their movement threw projectiles at police preventing them from moving along the famed shopping avenue, which was decked out in twinkling Christmas lights.

They also built barricades in some spots, and tore down traffic lights and street signs, creating riotous scenes reminiscent of France’s 1968 civil unrest, or street insurrections in the mid-19th century immortalised in paintings and movies.

Police arrested 130 people, 69 of those in Paris, and 24 people were injured, five of them police officers including one who suffered burns to his groin, the city police department and Interior Minister Christophe Castaner said.

Elsewhere, protesters took over highway toll booths to let traffic pass for free, or held go-slow vehicle processions, underlining one of their core complaints of escalating taxes on car fuel, especially diesel.

Macron, targeted by protesters’ calls that he resign, took to Twitter to thank police.

“Shame” on those who assaulted or intimidated citizens, journalists and politicians, Macron said. “There is no place for violence in the (French) Republic.”

Calm returned to the streets of the capital after midnight on Saturday, with the Champs-Elysees reopening to traffic.

The clean-up operation also got under way as garbage trucks were deployed and workers removed barricades along the famous avenue.     

Smaller than a week ago                

The violence was on a smaller scale than a week ago when the “yellow vest” movement staged its first nationwide protest.

“We’re not here to beat up cops. We came because we want the government to hear us,” said one protest spokeswoman, Laetitia Dewalle, 37, adding that the largely spontaneous movement denounced “violence by pseudo-protesters” on the fringes.

“We have just demonstrated peacefully, and we were teargassed,” said Christophe, 49, who travelled from the Isere region in eastern France with his wife to protest in the capital.

The interior ministry counted 106,000 protesters across France on Saturday, with 8,000 in Paris, of whom around 5,000 were on the Champs-Elysees.

That was far less than the national tally of 282,000 in the November 17 protests.

Castaner said after the tumult died down that damage on the Champs-Elysees was “small”.

The French government cast blame for the unruly protests on far-right politician Marine Le Pen, claiming she egged them on.

But Le Pen rejected that accusation saying she had “never called for any violence whatsoever” and in turn accused the government of “organising the tension” and seeking to make her a scapegoat.

Meanwhile, opposition parties on both the right and left accused the government of trying to reduce the protests to just the sporadic scenes of violence, and turning a deaf ear to the demonstrators’ grievances.

Jean-Luc Melenchon, leader of the radical left France Unbowed party who attended a separate march Saturday protesting violence against women, tweeted that the action on the streets was “a mass protest of the people” which signalled “the end for Castaner”.                 

Rural frustrations

A week ago, two people died and over 750 people, including 136 police officers, were injured in sometimes violent demonstrations that have shone a light on frustrations in many rural areas and small towns of France.

The “yellow vests” hail overwhelmingly from non-urban areas of France. They feel overlooked and penalised by policies they see as being pushed through by elitist politicians in Paris.

Former investment banker Macron was elected on a pledge to put more money in workers’ pockets. But the effects of his pro-business reforms on unemployment and purchasing power have been limited so far.

Many of the often low-income “yellow vest” protesters are particularly incensed at his decision to hike anti-pollution taxes on diesel, while scrapping a wealth tax on the rich.

“I’m not just fighting against the price of fuel. It’s about tax, what we pay,” protester Catherine Marguier told AFP near the village of La Gravelle in northwest France.

Meanwhile, in a separate protest in the southern city of Marseille, police fired teargas at bottle-throwing demonstrators upset by the “gentrification” renovation work on the town’s biggest square. Around 1,200 demonstrators took part and two were arrested.                 

‘Gap between rich and poor’

Revolts against taxes have been a feature of French public life for centuries. Citizens still pay some of the highest in Europe as a percentage of GDP, and fuel-price protests are a common modern occurrence.

Previous rounds pitting the government against drivers took place in 1995, 2000, 2004, and 2008, often when tax increases coincided with high oil prices — as they have this year.

A poll by the Odoxa research group for Le Figaro newspaper this week found that 77 percent of respondents described it as “justified”.