Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Stati Uniti

USA. 2021Q2. Pil +6.5%.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-07-31.

2021-07-30__ Usa PCE 001

Si notino due elementi.

– Il pil è aumentato di una percentuale quasi eguale a quella del PCE, ossia il 6.4%. L’aumento del Pil è virtualmente eguale alla inflazione stimata con il PCE,

– Il valore del Pil è artatamente gonfiato, contabilizzando come prodotti da lavoro i sussidi assistenziali.

* * *

«Disposable personal income decreased $1.42 trillion, or 26.1 percent»

«Real disposable personal income decreased 30.6 percent»

«personal saving as a percentage of disposable personal income—was 10.9 percent in the second quarter, compared with 20.8 percent in the first quarter»

Questi macro dati sembrerebbero essere ben poco entusiasmanti.

* * * * * * *


Bureau of Economic Analysis. Gross Domestic Product, Second Quarter 2021 (Advance Estimate) and Annual Update

                         Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 6.5 percent in the second quarter of 2021 (table 1), according to the “advance” estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the first quarter, real GDP increased 6.3 percent (revised).

The GDP estimate released today is based on source data that are incomplete or subject to further revision by the source agency (see “Source Data for the Advance Estimate” on page 3). The “second” estimate for the second quarter, based on more complete data, will be released on August 26, 2021.

The increase in real GDP in the second quarter reflected increases in personal consumption expenditures (PCE), nonresidential fixed investment, exports, and state and local government spending that were partly offset by decreases in private inventory investment, residential fixed investment, and federal government spending. Imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP, increased (table 2).

The increase in PCE reflected increases in services (led by food services and accommodations) and goods (led by “other” nondurable goods, notably pharmaceutical products). The increase in nonresidential fixed investment reflected increases in equipment (led by transportation equipment) and intellectual property products (led by research and development). The increase in exports reflected an increase in goods (led by nonautomotive capital goods) and services (led by travel). The decrease in private inventory investment was led by a decrease in retail trade inventories. The decrease in federal government spending primarily reflected a decrease in nondefense spending on intermediate goods and services In the second quarter, nondefense services decreased as the processing and administration of Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan applications by banks on behalf of the federal government declined.

Current‑dollar GDP increased 13.0 percent at an annual rate, or $684.4 billion, in the second quarter to a level of $22.72 trillion. In the first quarter, current-dollar GDP increased 10.9 percent, or $560.6 billion (revised, tables 1 and 3). More information on the source data that underlie the estimates is available in the Key Source Data and      Assumptions file on BEA’s website.

                         The price index for gross domestic purchases increased 5.7 percent in the second quarter, compared with an increase of 3.9 percent (revised) in the first quarter (table 4). The PCE price index increased 6.4 percent, compared with an increase of 3.8 percent (revised). Excluding food and energy prices, the PCE price index increased 6.1 percent, compared with an increase of 2.7 percent (revised).

                         Personal Income

                         Current-dollar personal income decreased $1.32 trillion in the second quarter, or 22.0 percent, in contrast to an increase of $2.33 trillion (revised), or 56.8 percent, in the first quarter. The decrease  primarily reflected a decrease in government social benefits related to pandemic relief programs, notably the decrease in direct economic impact payments to households established by the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act and the American Rescue Plan Act (table 8). Additional information on factors impacting personal income can be found in Effects of Selected Federal Pandemic Response Programs on Personal Income.

                         Disposable personal income decreased $1.42 trillion, or 26.1 percent, in the second quarter, in contrast to an increase of $2.27 trillion, or 63.7 percent (revised), in the first quarter. Real disposable personal income decreased 30.6 percent, in contrast to an increase of 57.6 percent.

                         Personal outlays increased $680.8 billion, after increasing $538.8 billion. The increase in outlays was led by an increase in PCE for services.

                         Personal saving was $1.97 trillion in the second quarter, compared with $4.07 trillion (revised) in the first quarter.  The personal saving rate—personal saving as a percentage of disposable personal income—was 10.9 percent in the second quarter, compared with 20.8 percent in the first quarter.

                         Source Data for the Advance Estimate

Information on the key source data and assumptions used in the advance estimate is provided in a Technical Note that is posted with the news release on BEA’s website. A detailed Key Source Data and Assumptions file is also posted for each release. For information on updates to GDP, see the “Additional Information” section that follows.

                         Annual Update of the National Economic Accounts

Today’s release also reflects the Annual Update of the National Income and Product Accounts; the updated Industry Economic Accounts will be released on September 30, 2021, along with the third estimate of GDP for the second quarter of 2021. The timespan of the update is the first quarter of 1999 through the first quarter of 2021 and resulted in revisions to GDP, GDI, and their major components. The reference year remains 2012. More information on the 2021 Annual Update is included in the May Survey of Current Business article, GDP and the Economy.
For the period of economic expansion from the second quarter of 2009 through the fourth quarter of 2019, real GDP increased at an annual rate of 2.3 percent, the same as previously published. For the period of economic contraction from the fourth quarter of 2019 through the second quarter of 2020, real GDP decreased at an annual rate of 19.2 percent, also the same as previously published. For the period of economic expansion from the second quarter of 2020 through the first quarter of 2021, real GDP increased at an annual rate of 14.1 percent, an upward revision of 0.1 percentage point from the previously published estimate.

With today’s release, most NIPA tables are available through BEA’s Interactive Data application on the BEA website (www.bea.gov). See Information on Updates to the National Economic Accounts for the complete table release schedule and a summary of results through 2020, which includes a discussion of methodology changes. A table showing the major current‑dollar revisions and their sources for each component of GDP, national income, and personal income is also provided. The August 2021 Survey of Current Business will contain an article describing the update in more detail.

Updates for the First Quarter of 2021

For the first quarter of 2021, real GDP is estimated to have increased 6.3 percent (table 1), 0.1 percentage point less than previously published. The revision primarily reflected downward revisions to federal government spending, state and local government spending, and exports that were partly offset by an upward revision to nonresidential fixed investment.

Real GDI is now estimated to have increased 6.3 percent in the first quarter (table 1); in the previously published estimates, first-quarter GDI was estimated to have increased 7.6 percent. The leading contributor to the downward revision was compensation, based primarily on new first-quarter wage and salary estimates from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

The price index for gross domestic purchases is now estimated to have increased 3.9 percent in the first quarter, 0.1 percentage point lower than previously published (table 4). The PCE price index increased 3.8 percent, 0.1 percentage point higher than previously published. Excluding food and energy prices, the PCE price index increased 2.7 percent, 0.2 percentage point higher than previously published.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Stati Uniti

USA. 2021Q1. Pil ufficiale +6.4%. Detratte sovvenzioni ed inflazione circa zero. – BEA.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-06-25.

2021-06-25__ usa Pil 001

Si faccia la massima attenzione!

«Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 6.4 percent in the first quarter of 2021, reflecting the continued economic recovery, reopening of establishments, and continued government response related to the COVID-19 pandemic»

«The increase in real GDP in the first quarter reflected increases in personal consumption expenditures (PCE), nonresidential fixed investment, federal government spending, residential fixed investment, and state and local government spending The increase in real GDP in the first quarter reflected increases in personal consumption expenditures (PCE), nonresidential fixed investment, federal government spending, residential fixed investment, and state and local government spending»

«The increase in PCE reflected increases in durable goods (led by motor vehicles and parts), nondurable goods (led by food and beverages), and services (led by food services and accommodations). …. The increase in federal government spending primarily reflected an increase in payments made to banks for processing and administering the Paycheck Protection Program loan applications»

* * * * * * *

Cosa sta succedendo?

Il Bureau of Economic Analysis, ossia l’ente governativo che calcola e rilascia il pil ed il pec americano include nel pil tutte le sovvenzioni erogate dallo stato federale, dai singoli stati e dai governi locali. Una cifra immane generata ricorrendo al debito coperto dalla Fed con denaro fiat, che è stata trattata alla stregua di ricchezza generata dalla produzione nazionale, ossia dal lavoro.

Detratte dal calcolo le sovvenzioni assistenziali, il pil sarebbe circa eguale al 4%.

Ma il Pce, personal consumption expenditures, ossia l’indice di inflazione prediletto dalla Fed, è schizzato in questo trimestre proprio al 4%. In altri termini, l’inflazione si fagocita il valore degli aumenti del pil. Si da con una mano e si toglie con l’altra.

Ciò non desta sorprese.

Nel suo Report Personal Income and Outlays, April 2021 il Bureau of Economic Analysis  stesso riportava che il Disposable personal income era -14.6%. Una diminuzione delle entrate dei cittadini del -14.6% sembrerebbe essere non compatibile con un aumento del prodotto interno lordo.

Si noti anche come, sempre il Bureau of Economic Analysis aveva stimato il PCI al 5%:

Consumer prices increase 5.0 percent for the year ended May 2021

«The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers increased 5.0 percent from May 2020 to May 2021. Prices for food advanced 2.2 percent, while prices for energy increased 28.5 percent»

Ma con un aumento del 28.5% dell’energia, come fa l’inflazione ad essere solo il 4%?

*

Bureau of Economic Analysis. Gross Domestic Product (Third Estimate), GDP by Industry, and Corporate Profits (Revised), 1st Quarter 2021.

«Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 6.4 percent in the first quarter of 2021, reflecting the continued economic recovery, reopening of establishments, and continued government response related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The increase was the same rate as the “second” estimate released in May. In the first quarter, government assistance payments, such as direct economic impact payments, expanded unemployment benefits, and Paycheck Protection Program loans were distributed to households and businesses through the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act and the American Rescue Plan Act. In the fourth quarter of 2020, real GDP increased 4.3 percent.»

* * *

Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 6.4 percent in the first quarter of 2021 (table 1), according to the “third” estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the fourth quarter, real GDP increased 4.3 percent.

The “third” estimate of GDP released today is based on more complete source data than were available for the “second” estimate issued last month. In the second estimate, the increase in real GDP was also 6.4 percent. Upward revisions to nonresidential fixed investment, private inventory investment, and exports were offset by an upward revision to imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP (see “Updates to GDP”).

→→ The increase in real GDP in the first quarter reflected increases in personal consumption expenditures (PCE), nonresidential fixed investment, federal government spending, residential fixed investment, and state and local government spending that were partly offset by decreases in private inventory investment and exports. Imports increased. ←←

The increase in PCE reflected increases in durable goods (led by motor vehicles and parts), nondurable goods (led by food and beverages), and services (led by food services and accommodations). The increase in nonresidential fixed investment reflected increases in equipment (led by information processing equipment) and intellectual property products (led by software). The increase in federal government spending primarily reflected an increase in payments made to banks for processing and administering the Paycheck Protection Program loan applications as well as purchases of COVID-19 vaccines for distribution to the public. The decrease in private inventory investment primarily reflected a decrease in retail trade inventories (mainly by motor vehicles and parts dealers).

Current dollar GDP increased 11.0 percent at an annual rate, or $566.8 billion, in the first quarter to a level of $22.06 trillion. In the fourth quarter, GDP increased 6.3 percent, or $324.4 billion (table 1 and table 3). More information on the source data that underlie the estimates is available in the Key Source Data and Assumptions file on BEA’s website.

The price index for gross domestic purchases increased 4.0 percent in the first quarter, compared with an increase of 1.7 percent in the fourth quarter (table 4). The PCE price index increased 3.7 percent, compared with an increase of 1.5 percent. Excluding food and energy prices, the PCE price index increased 2.5 percent, compared with an increase of 1.3 percent.

Gross Domestic Income and Corporate Profits

Real gross domestic income (GDI) increased 7.6 percent in the first quarter, compared with an increase of 19.4 percent in the fourth quarter. The average of real GDP and real GDI, a supplemental measure of U.S. economic activity that equally weights GDP and GDI, increased 7.0 percent in the first quarter, compared with an increase of 11.6 percent in the fourth quarter (table 1).

Profits from current production (corporate profits with inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments) increased $55.2 billion in the first quarter, in contrast to a decrease of $31.4 billion in the fourth quarter (table 10).

Profits of domestic financial corporations decreased $6.4 billion in the first quarter, in contrast to an increase of $17.5 billion in the fourth quarter. Profits of domestic nonfinancial corporations increased $72.1 billion, in contrast to a decrease of $48.2 billion. Rest-of-the-world profits decreased $10.6 billion, compared with a decrease of $0.7 billion. In the first quarter, receipts increased $34.2 billion, and payments increased $44.8 billion.

Updates to GDP

In the third estimate, the change in first-quarter real GDP was the same as in the second estimate. Upward revisions to nonresidential fixed investment, private inventory investment, exports, and PCE were offset by an upward revision to imports. For more information, see the Technical Note. For information on updates to GDP, see the “Additional Information” section that follows.

Real GDP by Industry

Today’s release includes estimates of GDP by industry, or value added—a measure of an industry’s contribution to GDP. In the first quarter, private goods-producing industries increased 5.4 percent, private services-producing industries increased 7.7 percent, and government increased 0.2 percent (table 12). Overall, 17 of 22 industry groups contributed to the first-quarter increase in real GDP.

The increase in private goods-producing industries primarily reflected an increase in durable goods manufacturing (led by computer and electronic products, fabricated metal products, and machinery). The increase was partly offset by decreases in nondurable goods manufacturing (led by petroleum and coal products) and agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting (led by farms).

The increase in private services-producing industries primarily reflected increases in professional, scientific, and technical services; information (led by data processing, internet publishing, and other information services); administrative and waste management services (led by administrative and support services); real estate and rental and leasing; and retail trade. These increases were partly offset by decreases in other services (which includes activities of political organizations); healthcare and social assistance (led by ambulatory health care services); and utilities.

The increase in government reflected increases in federal as well as state and local.

Gross Output by Industry

Real gross output—principally a measure of an industry’s sales or receipts, which includes sales to final users in the economy (GDP) and sales to other industries (intermediate inputs)—increased 8.9 percent in the first quarter (table 16). Private goods-producing industries decreased 1.7 percent, private services-producing industries increased 13.4 percent, and government increased 6.0 percent. Overall, 17 of 22 industry groups contributed to the increase in real gross output, led by retail trade, finance and insurance, and information. A decrease in nondurable goods manufacturing was the most notable offset to these increases.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo

Tempi di Inflazione. Spiegazione e link di alcuni termini più usati.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-06-01.

2021-06-01__ Inflazione 001

Attenzione!!

«Given the strong economic fluctuations in recent quarters, evolutions from Q4 2019 may be considered as reflecting the activity better than quarterly fluctuations.» [Insee]

«The increase in real GDP in the first quarter reflected increases in personal consumption expenditures (PCE), nonresidential fixed investment, federal government spending, residential fixed investment, and state and local government spending that were partly offset by decreases in private inventory investment and exports. Imports increased» [U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, BEA]

* * * * * * *

In questo glossario riportiamo solo le voci più frequentemente utilizzate.

Per ogni voce, compare il link all’ufficio governativo che la emana.

Qualora disponibili, si usino i rapporti sul Q4 2019, ossia sull’ultimo trimestre prima della recessione indotta dalla pandemia.

Si tenga infine sempre presente che i Pil rilasciati dagli stati occidentali sono ‘gonfiati’ perché assumono come ricchezza generata quella proveniente dai sussidi federali, statali e locali, mentre invece essi sono generati dal ricorso al debito. È un maquillage subdolo ma altamente efficace.

Simile ragionamento per gli indici di spesa dei consumatori.

* * * * * *


Borsa Italiana. Cos’è l’inflazione? Significato, cause e calcolo dei tassi di inflazione

                         Inflazione: definizione e significato

L’inflazione, in economia, indica una crescita generalizzata e continuativa dei prezzi nel tempo. È un indicatore fondamentale perché il livello dei prezzi condiziona il potere di acquisto delle famiglie, l’andamento generale dell’economia, l’orientamento delle politiche monetarie delle banche centrali.

                         Come si calcola l’inflazione

Per calcolare l’inflazione è necessario costruire un indice dei prezzi al consumo e nella maggior parte dei paesi la misurazione di questo indice è attribuita all’Istituto nazionale di statistica. In Italia se ne occupa dunque l’Istat che, sulla base dei prezzi di un insieme, denominato paniere, di beni e servizi, rappresentativo dei consumi delle famiglie, calcola il suo indice dei prezzi al consumo. Nel paniere dei prezzi al consumo dell’Istat sono presenti per esempio, con diversi pesi relativi, i prezzi dei prodotti di abbigliamento e delle calzature, dei prodotti alimentari, dei servizi sanitari, dei trasporti, dell’elettricità, dell’acqua e così via.

                         Gli indici dei prezzi al consumo dell’Istat

In particolare, l’Istat elabora tre indici principali dei prezzi al consumo:

– L’indice dei prezzi al consumo Nazionale per l’Intera Collettività (Nic) che misura la variazione nel tempo dei prezzi di beni e servizi acquistati sul mercato per i consumi finali individuali;

– L’indice dei prezzi al consumo per le Famiglie di Operai e Impiegati (Foi): calcola la variazione nel tempo dei prezzi al dettaglio, dei beni e servizi correntemente acquistati dalle famiglie di lavoratori dipendenti;

– L’Indice armonizzato dei prezzi al consumo (Ipca, in inglese l’acronimo è HICP ossia Harmonised Index of Consumer Prices) sviluppato per assicurare una misura dell’inflazione comparabile a livello europeo. A differenza degli indici Nic e Foi, l’indice IPCA si riferisce al prezzo effettivamente pagato dal consumatore ed esclude alcune voci presenti nel paniere degli altri due indici tenendo conto anche delle riduzioni temporanee di prezzo (come saldi, sconti e promozioni).

                         Inflazione, tassi di interesse e politica monetaria

È importante evidenziare che l’indice armonizzato europeo IPCA (o HICP) è di grande rilevanza perché utilizzato come indicatore di verifica della convergenza delle economie dei paesi membri della UE (Unione Europea), al fine della permanenza o dell’ingresso nell’Unione Monetaria. L’indice IPCA è inoltre utilizzato come riferimento dalla Banca Centrale Europea (Bce) per l’attuazione della politica monetaria europea. Come noto l’obiettivo principale della Bce è proprio quello di mantenere nell’Eurozona la stabilità dei prezzi.

La stabilità dei prezzi è infatti considerata una delle condizioni basilari per l’innalzamento del livello dell’attività economica e dell’occupazione. Un’inflazione in rapida crescita (“galoppante”) può infatti erodere il potere d’acquisto delle famiglie, di fatto impoverendole. Al contrario una deflazione, ossia un’inflazione negativa con prezzi in calo, può bloccare l’economia in quanto – per semplificare – i prezzi di vendita delle imprese non coprono i costi di produzione e le mandano in crisi. In ogni caso livelli troppo elevati o troppo bassi di inflazione spaventano gli investitori e danneggiano la fiducia, influendo negativamente sull’attività economica.

Per questi motivi le banche centrali fissano degli obiettivi di inflazione ai quali ancorano la propria politica monetaria ossia gli interventi convenzionali sui tassi d’interesse principali o non convenzionali, come il quantitative easing.
L’obiettivo della Bce è quello di portare su un livello prossimo ma inferiore al 2%, anche se negli ultimi anni è stato promosso un “approccio simmetrico” per cui il target può essere raggiunto sia dal basso che dall’alto (in altre parole non c’è un tetto al 2%, ma eventuali deviazioni dei prezzi possono avvenire in un senso o nell’altro). Questo livello dei prezzi è ritenuto dalla maggior parte delle banche centrali del mondo ottimale al fine di garantire i diversi attori del contesto economico.

* * *


Borsa Italiana. Consumer price index (CPI)

                         L’indice dei prezzi al consumo.

Il Consumer price index (CPI), dall’inglese indice dei prezzi al consumo, è un indice che viene calcolato per mezzo di una media ponderata dei prezzi relativi ad un paniere (insieme) di beni e servizi in un determinato periodo di tempo.

Tale paniere è rappresentativo delle abitudini di spesa del consumatore (urbano) americano medio.

Il CPI è importante in quanto, misurando le variazioni dei prezzi, segnala l’aumento dell’inflazione.

Proprio per questo il CPI viene utilizzato dal Governo federale Usa per decidere quali politiche economiche mettere in atto per prevenire l’inflazione, per calcolare il Pil, che tiene conto della variazione dei prezzi, e per decidere quali programmi governativi adottare in materia di welfare e assistenza.

                         Caratteristiche.

Il Consumer price index viene elaborato dal Dipartimento del Lavoro statunitense (Bureau of Labor Statistics) il quale raccoglie le informazioni dei prezzi al dettaglio di 23 mila imprese che servono 14.500 famiglie.
Il paniere è rappresentativo dell’87% della popolazione statunitense.

Per costruire il CPI servono due tipologie di dati: i prezzi e i pesi.

I prezzi sono raccolti su un campione di beni e servizi mentre i pesi rappresentano delle stime relative alla quota delle differenti tipologie di spesa come percentuale del totale delle spese coperte dall’indice.

Il CPI include le imposte sulle vendite ma non quelle sul reddito.

Sebbene molto rappresentativo la copertura del CPI ovviamente è limitata in quanto, ad esempio, non include i prezzi di investimenti in azioni e obbligazioni nonostante alcune tipologie di investimenti possano rientrare attraverso i prodotti assicurativi.
E’ esclusa inoltre la spesa dei consumatori americani all’estero e quella dei consumatori stranieri in America. Non vengono considerate nell’indice inoltre alcune categorie sociali come i gruppi eccezionalmente ricchi o quelli molto al di sotto della soglia di povertà.

Può essere anche esclusa larga parte della popolazione rurale in quanto l’indice è maggiormente rappresentativo delle abitudini di consumo delle famiglie urbane.

L’indice che solitamente è pubblicato il quindicesimo giorno del mese successivo a quello di riferimento riporta due misure quella cosiddetta Core CPI (ex food and Energy) che non tiene in considerazione dei beni alimentari e i costi energetici, a causa della loro eccessiva volatilità, e il dato non-core CPI comprendente tutto il paniere di beni e servizi.

Il dato “Core” è il più importante tra i due in quanto sulla base di esso la Fed prende le proprie decisioni sui tassi.

*


U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Consumer Price Index

«The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is a measure of the average change over time in the prices paid by urban consumers for a market basket of consumer goods and services. Indexes are available for the U.S. and various geographic areas. Average price data for select utility, automotive fuel, and food items are also available»

Usualmente è pubblicato il decimo giorno di ogni mese e si riferisce a quello pregresso. Con la variazione su base mensile, è riportata anche quella anno su anno. Per esempio:

«In April, the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers rose 0.8 percent on a seasonally adjusted basis; rising 4.2 percent over the last 12 months»

* * *


U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Producer Price Indexes

«The Producer Price Index (PPI) program measures the average change over time in the selling prices received by domestic producers for their output. The prices included in the PPI are from the first commercial transaction for many products and some services»

Usualmente è pubblicato il quindicesimo giorno di ogni mese e si riferisce a quello pregresso. Con la variazione su base mensile, è riportata anche quella anno su anno. Per esempio:

«The Producer Price Index for final demand increased 0.6 percent in April, as prices for both final demand services and final demand goods also rose 0.6 percent. The final demand index advanced 6.2 percent for the 12 months ended in April»

* * *


U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. Consumer spending, or personal consumption expenditures (PCE).

«Consumer spending, or personal consumption expenditures (PCE), is the value of the goods and services purchased by, or on the behalf of, U.S. residents. At the national level, BEA publishes annual, quarterly, and monthly estimates of consumer spending.

The PCE price index, released each month in the Personal Income and Outlays report, reflects changes in the prices of goods and services purchased by consumers in the United States. Quarterly and annual data are included in the GDP release.»

Usualmente è pubblicato il venticinquesimo giorno di ogni mese e si riferisce a quello pregresso. Con la variazione su base mensile, è riportata anche quella anno su anno.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Italia. Il Patto di Stabilità ritorna in vigore dal 2023. Si prospettano lacrime e sangue.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-06-01.

Giulio Romano. Palazzo Gonzaga. Sala dei giganti. 004

European Commission. Remarks by Executive Vice-President Dombrovskis on the updated approach to the fiscal policy response to the coronavirus pandemic.

«The first of these relates to the general escape clause»

«Based on the preliminary indications of the Commission’s 2021 winter forecast, GDP should reach its 2019 level towards the middle of 2022. On this basis, the general escape clause remains active in 2022 and no longer in 2023.»

* * *

“The stability pact will return in 2023”. Dombrovskis’ announcement.

«“Also on the basis of the spring economic forecasts, we can confirm our general approach of keeping the general safeguard clause active (which suspends the Stability Pact, ed) in 2022 but no longer in 2023”. This was stated by the vice president of the European Commission, Valdis Dombrovskis, at the end of the Ecofin meeting in Lisbon.

“With the gradual lifting of restrictions and the advancement of vaccination campaigns, member states can expect a fairly strong rebound of the economy in the second half of the year and into 2022,” he said on arrival.

“The European Commission has two months to evaluate the recovery and resilience plans, we can somehow speed up this process but not that much because we have already received 18 plans and more will arrive. They are complicated documents and their evaluation takes time” he said. Dombrovskis said again “In any case, we aim for the second half of June. It will then depend on how long the Council will take for its approval procedures. Hopefully, including the ratification procedures, we can expect the first funds in July”, he added»

* * * * * * *

Facciamo attenzione!

Il valore del pil delle nazioni occidentali è drogato, come ammette onestamente il Bureau of Economic Analysis nel suo Report Gross Domestic Product, First Quarter 2021 (Advance Estimate)

«The increase in real GDP in the first quarter reflected increases in personal consumption expenditures (PCE), nonresidential fixed investment, federal government spending, residential fixed investment, and state and local government spending that were partly offset by decreases in private inventory investment and exports»

In parole miserrime, i fondi fiat elargiti dagli Stati sono contabilizzati come se fossero stati prodotti dal sistema economico, mentre invece provengono da un incremento del debito.

Codesto maquillage consente di poter esibire un pil decisamente più robusto di quello reale e di poterlo manipolare a piacere a fini politici.

Con questa severa limitazione, si badi bene come l’unico raffronto significativo sia quello con il pil ottenuto nel 2019, ossia prima dell’evento pandemico. Infatti, il raffronto 2021/2020 risulterebbe essere errato, essendosi il pil severamente ridotto nel corso del 2020 ed il pil dell’anno in corso gonfiato ad arte.

* * * * * * *

«L’UE conferma il ritorno del Patto di Stabilità a partire dal 2023»

«La clausola di salvaguardia che era stata inserita per il Covid-19 sarà, dunque, eliminata e con non poche conseguenze per l’Italia»

«La clausola di salvaguardia che dall’anno scorso sospendeva il Patto di Stabilità e che era stata inserita come garanzia di tutela per l’Italia, è non solo, a causa della situazione Covid-19 non esisterà più»

«Dopo un aumento del PIL previsto per metà 2021, infatti, l’economia degli Stati membri sembrerebbe tornare a godere di nuovo dei livelli pre-Covid e questo già a partire dal 2022»

«La cessazione della clausola di sospensione del Patto di Stabilità porterà comunque delle conseguenze per l’Italia e la sua economia che coinvolgeranno, direttamente o indirettamente, anche i cittadini»

«È proprio il Recovery Plan uno degli aspetti del presente su cui verte il dibattito economico italiano»

«Ad oggi, Bankitalia ha stimato che per l’Italia la crescita tramite i fondi UE sarebbe circa pari al 2% del PIL, il che significa lo 0,5% all’anno per i prossimi 4 anni. Tuttavia, l’Italia ha visto una caduta del PIL del 9% solo quest’anno. Accettando i fondi UE la crescita sembrerebbe essere comunque modesta, in cambio di riforme che sembra ipotecheranno il futuro dell’Italia»

«La prima conseguenza del ritorno del Patto di Stabilità sarebbe quella di sottostare ai vincoli di bilancio dal 2023, probabilmente, però, con modalità diverse da quelle che sono state in vigore fino all’epoca pre-Covid»

«Ciò si riverserà comunque anche sull’Italia, la quale dovrà sottostare alle disposizioni UE. Avere un debito più elevato significa, infatti, riforme»

«L’Italia, come ciascuno Stato membro, è chiamata a ridurre la parte di debito eccedente il 60% di 1/20 l’anno nella media di riferimento di un triennio. Viene confermato dunque il rientro del debito/PIL ai livelli pre Covid (135%) entro il 2030»

«All’atto dello scostamento di bilancio autorizzato dal Parlamento il 14 gennaio 2021, l’indebitamento aggiuntivo italiano è arrivato a 32 miliardi netti e porterà il deficit del PIL previsto per il 2021 intorno al 9%»

«Che la barca sia la stessa per tutti, è da vedere: tuttavia, che la totalità dei Paesi membri stia aumentando il debito sembra un dato certo»

* * * * * * *

La pacchia è finita.

Ricostruire qualcosa, sempre poi che sia possibile, sarà una lunga e dolorosa strada tutta in salita.

Il bengodi è terminato.

Si noti come nessuno osi parlare dell’inflazione, come se questa non esistesse.

*


Il Patto di Stabilità ritorna dal 2023: le conseguenze per l’Italia.

L’UE conferma il ritorno del Patto di Stabilità a partire dal 2023. La clausola di salvaguardia che era stata inserita per il Covid-19 sarà, dunque, eliminata e con non poche conseguenze per l’Italia.

Dal 2023 torna il Patto di Stabilità: questo è l’annuncio che arriva dall’Unione Europea.

La clausola di salvaguardia che dall’anno scorso sospendeva il Patto di Stabilità e che era stata inserita come garanzia di tutela per l’Italia, è non solo, a causa della situazione Covid-19 non esisterà più.

Dal 2023 il Patto sarà ripristinato e questo implicherà conseguenze per l’Italia e la sua economia di fianco a tutti gli Stati membri dell’Unione.

                         Perché il Patto di Stabilità ritorna dal 2023

Le previsioni dell’economia europea sembrano essere positive, almeno in linea generale: ecco il perché ritornerà il Patto di Stabilità dal 2023.

Dopo un aumento del PIL previsto per metà 2021, infatti, l’economia degli Stati membri sembrerebbe tornare a godere di nuovo dei livelli pre-Covid e questo già a partire dal 2022. Tale previsione è la base sulla quale la Commissione europea ha deciso che il Patto di Stabilità tornerà in vigore a partire dal 2023.

L’approccio europeo è quello di mantenere la clausola di salvaguardia ancora attiva per tutto il corso del 2022 per dare più tempo alla situazione pandemica di risolversi ulteriormente, sostenendo le aziende con finanziamenti e la popolazione anche attraverso la campagna vaccinale in corso.

La cessazione della clausola di sospensione del Patto di Stabilità porterà comunque delle conseguenze per l’Italia e la sua economia che coinvolgeranno, direttamente o indirettamente, anche i cittadini.

                         Patto di Stabilità: l’eredità della pandemia e la risposta dell’Europa

Sembrerebbero esserci timori riguardo il ritorno del Patto di Stabilità già dal 2023. La pandemia – come tutte le crisi – ha lasciato dal punto di vista economico un’eredità che non può essere ignorata.

Il timore prevalente, che viene espresso anche dal vice presidente della Banca centrale europea, Luis de Guindos, è sul rischio di ritirare gli aiuti dell’UE troppo presto. Secondo il vice presidente è importante che il ritiro delle misure di sostegno avvenga in modo graduale e che si creino misure specifiche ad hoc.

Bruxelles, nell’annuncio del ritorno del Patto di Stabilità dal 2023, guarda però prevalentemente al futuro con occhi puntati sul Recovery Plan.

                         La situazione italiana oggi, prima del ritorno del Patto di Stabilità

È proprio il Recovery Plan uno degli aspetti del presente su cui verte il dibattito economico italiano. Infatti, il PNRR che venne approvato dal Governo Conte il 12 gennaio 2021 non venne accettato da Bruxelles. La motivazione da parte dell’Unione Europea riguardava il fatto che i piani nazionali per la ripresa e la resilienza devono contenere al loro interno una spiegazione del modo stesso in cui quello specifico piano contribuisce alle sfide pertinenti per il Paese.

I piani nazionali devono comunque essere utili alla Nazione che li riguarda oltre che risultare in linea con le direttive UE: in merito, le discussioni tra convergenza dell’interesse nazionale e quello europeo sono ancora aperte.

Ad oggi, Bankitalia ha stimato che per l’Italia la crescita tramite i fondi UE sarebbe circa pari al 2% del PIL, il che significa lo 0,5% all’anno per i prossimi 4 anni. Tuttavia, l’Italia ha visto una caduta del PIL del 9% solo quest’anno. Accettando i fondi UE la crescita sembrerebbe essere comunque modesta, in cambio di riforme che sembra ipotecheranno il futuro dell’Italia.

Il Patto di Stabilità e Crescita (PSC) è stato più volte considerato un ciclo economico rigido che vede l’Unione Europea al centro di accordi con gli Stati membri, tra cui l’Italia.

La prima conseguenza del ritorno del Patto di Stabilità sarebbe quella di sottostare ai vincoli di bilancio dal 2023, probabilmente, però, con modalità diverse da quelle che sono state in vigore fino all’epoca pre-Covid.

L’aspettativa europea è infatti quella di non ripetere “errori” che sono stati commessi in passato. In merito, viene preso atto da parte dell’UE della pandemia in corso. Il debito dovrebbe crescere dopo il Covid-19 di 17-20 punti sul PIL; questo è il motivo per cui le regole fiscali europee saranno diverse nel post pandemia.

Ciò si riverserà comunque anche sull’Italia, la quale dovrà sottostare alle disposizioni UE. Avere un debito più elevato significa, infatti, riforme.

L’Italia, come ciascuno Stato membro, è chiamata a ridurre la parte di debito eccedente il 60% di 1/20 l’anno nella media di riferimento di un triennio. Viene confermato dunque il rientro del debito/PIL ai livelli pre Covid (135%) entro il 2030.

Più si parte con un debito alto, più risorse l’Italia dovrà «togliere» all’economia per diminuirlo nei tempi previsti dall’Unione. Se le regole dell’Unione Europea restassero invariate, l’impegno italiano a ridurre il debito sarebbe così grande da comprometterne ogni aspettativa di ripresa interna.

                         Italia e Patto di Stabilità: le previsioni per il futuro

L’Europa e l’European Fiscal Board pensano all’Italia con una riforma “country specific” che considererebbe il debito inerente al Paese, senza generalizzazioni fiscali.

All’atto dello scostamento di bilancio autorizzato dal Parlamento il 14 gennaio 2021, l’indebitamento aggiuntivo italiano è arrivato a 32 miliardi netti e porterà il deficit del PIL previsto per il 2021 intorno al 9%. Con l’ultimo scostamento di bilancio – servito per finanziare il Decreto Sostegni bis – il debito pubblico in Italia segna il record (159,8%) superando anche quello del primo dopoguerra che si attesto al 159,5%.

Il rapporto debito/PIL, come si legge nel DEF, dovrebbe cominciare a scendere a partire dal 2022 e arrivare a livelli pre-Covid (ovvero al 135%) entro il 2030. Il rapporto deficit/PIL scenderà al 5,9% nel 2022, al 4,3% nel 2023 e al 3,4% nel 2024. Dal 2025 si tornerà sotto la soglia del 3%. Il rapporto debito/PIL raggiungerà il 159,8% nel 2021 per arrivare al 152,7 nel 2024.

                         La risposta di Draghi al ritorno del Patto di Stabilità nel 2023.

Draghi, tra le necessità dell’anno 2021 rimarca l’importanza di accompagnare le imprese nel percorso di uscita dalla recessione e dichiara: “è un anno in cui non si chiedono soldi all’Italia, ma si danno”.

Non è al debito né al Patto di Stabilità che bisogna guardare adesso, dice Draghi, rimandando le preoccupazioni al prossimo futuro imminente, poiché tutte le economie europee sono in recessione e si trovano sulla stessa barca dell’Italia.

Che la barca sia la stessa per tutti, è da vedere: tuttavia, che la totalità dei Paesi membri stia aumentando il debito sembra un dato certo. Proprio per questo, Draghi sembra essere positivo riguardo al possibile cambio delle modalità europee per il Patto di Stabilità che ritornerà dal 2023.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Economia e Produzione Industriale, Stati Uniti

Buffett Indicator. 20 maggio. Vale 227%. In realtà è molto di più.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-05-24.

2021-05-24__ Buffett Indicator 001

Attenzione!!!!

Il valore del pil americano è drogato, come ammette onestamente il Bureau of Economic Analysis nel suo Report Gross Domestic Product, First Quarter 2021 (Advance Estimate)

«The increase in real GDP in the first quarter reflected increases in personal consumption expenditures (PCE), nonresidential fixed investment, federal government spending, residential fixed investment, and state and local government spending that were partly offset by decreases in private inventory investment and exports. Imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP, increased»

In parole miserrime, i fondi fiat elargiti dalla Federazione e dagli Stati sono stati contabilizzati come se fossero stati prodotti dal sistema economico.

Codesto maquillage consente di poter esibire un pil decisamente più robusto di quello reale e di poterlo manipolare a piacere.

* * * * * * *


Theory & Data

The Buffett Indicator is the ratio of total US stock market valuation to GDP. Named after Warren Buffett, who called the ratio “the best single measure of where valuations stand at any given moment”. (Buffett later walked back those comments, hesitating to endorse any single measure as either comprehensive or consistent over time, but this ratio remains credited to his name). To calculate the ratio, we need to get data for both metrics: Total Market Value and GDP.

                         Total Market Value.

The most common measurement of the aggregate value of the US stock market is the Wilshire 5000. This is available directly from Wilshire (links to all data sources below), with monthly data starting in 1971, and daily measures beginning in 1980. The Wilshire index was created such that a 1-point increase in the index corresponds to a $1 billion increase in US market cap. Since inception that 1:1 ratio has drifted, and per Wilshire, as of Dec 2013 a 1-point increase in the index corresponded to a $1.15 billion dollar increase. We adjust the data back to inception (and projected going forward) on a straight-line basis to compensate for this drift. For example, the Sep 2020 Wilshire Index of 35,807 corresponds to a total real market cap value of $42.27T USD.

For data prior to 1970 (where Wilshire data is not available) we use the Z.1 Financial Account – Nonfinancial corporate business; corporate equities; liability, Level, published by the Federal Reserve, which provides a quarterly estimate of total market value back to 1945. In order to integrate the datasets, we index the Z.1 data to match up to the 1970 Wilshire starting point.

Combined, these data make our Composite US Stock Market Value data series, shown below. Our estimate of current composite US stock market value is $51.3T.

                         GDP.

The Gross Domestic Product (GDP) represents the total production of the US economy. This is measured quarterly by the US Government’s Bureau of Economic Analysis. The GDP is a static measurement of prior economic activity – it does not forecast the future or include any expectation or valuation of future economic activity or economic growth. The GDP is calculated and published quarterly, several months in arrears, such that by the time the data is published it is several months old. In order to provide updated data for the most recent quarter we use the most recent GDPNow estimate published by the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. The GDP data is all nominal and not inflation adjusted. Our estimate of current (annualized) GDP is $22.6T. A historical chart of GDP is shown below.

                         The Ratio of the Two.

Given that the stock market represents primarily expectations of future economic activity, and the GDP is a measure of most recent economic activity, the ratio of these two data series represents expected future growth relative to current performance. This is similar in nature to how we think about the PE ratio of a particular stock. It stands to reason that this ratio would remain relatively stable over time, and increase slowly over time as technology allows for the same labor and capital to be used ever more efficiently.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Stati Uniti

Harris-Biden Administration. Brucia sulla graticola degli eventi che non sa dominare.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-05-20.

Casa Bianca

La Harris-Biden Administration è sulla graticola, al momento incapace di gestire una serie di problemi politici ed economici laceranti.

– «Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 6.4 percent in the first quarter of 2021 …. The increase in real GDP in the first quarter reflected increases in personal consumption expenditures (PCE), nonresidential fixed investment, federal government spending, residential fixed investment, and state and local government spending». [Bureau of Economic Analysis]

Si faccia attenzione come questo incremento sia nei fatti sostenuto da “personal consumption expenditures …. federal government spending …. state and local government spending”. In realtà, l’incremento non è stato generato dal sistema ecomomico produttivo.

Non solo. Il Gdp è sicuramente un importante macrodato, ma altrettanto sicuramente non è l’unico da dover essere monitorato. Occupazione ed inflazione sono ben più importanti.

Usa. Indice dei Prezzi al Consumo +4.2% anno su anno. Fed in tilt.

La settimana scorsa l’inflazione è schizzata al 4.2%, logica conseguenza della massiccia iniezione di liquidità nel sistema. Ma se perdurasse nel tempo, obbligherebbe la Fed ad aumentare i tassi, facendo crollare tutto i sistema basato su tassi quasi eguali allo zero.

Harris-Biden Administration. Aprile21. Il fallimento dei posti di lavoro. Diseguaglianze.

Nel mese di aprile, come peraltro in quelli precedenti, l’economia americana ha aggiunto la misera quota di 266,000 nuovi posti di lavoro, ed i dati preliminari che stanno affluendo suggerirebbero che il mese di maggio non sia poi molto meglio. La Harris-Biden Administration dimostra la sua incapacità a generare nuovi posti di lavoro:  è nei triboli.

Tensions Among Democrats Grow Over Israel as the Left Defends Palestinians.

US legislator AOC calls Israel an ‘apartheid state’.

La forte ala liberal confluita nel partito democratico sta duramente contestando l’ambiguo comportamento della Harris-Biden Administration nei confronti del conflitto in corso tra palestinesi ed Israele.

Alexandria Ocasio Cortez ha portato il discorso ai limiti di una spaccatura del partito democratico.

In realtà, la Kamala Harris non sa che pesci prendere. Giace imbelle come una medusa spiaggiata.

USA. 124 generali ed ammiragli diffidano la Harris-Biden Administration.

Per la prima volta nella storia americana, 124 tra generali ed ammiragli hanno rilasciato una lettera aperta alla Harris-Biden Administration, che, inter alias, bollano di “patologie mentali” e di voler sottomettere gli Stati Uniti alla loro dittatura. Una lettera quanto mai pesante, segno del profondo travaglio che attanaglia le Forze Armate. Anche su questo problema non da poco la Harris-Biden Administration si è ritirata nel riserbo di chi non sa cosa dire e cosa fare.

* * * * * * *

Avere una Amministrazione portatrice di “patologie mentali“, lo dicono i generali, non è certo motivo di consolazione, né in America né nel mondo.

*

Job fears, price spikes mean heartburn for Biden White House as economy revs up.

                         High unemployment. Rising prices. Gas lines.

They’re a bad memory for Americans old enough to remember the 1970s – but they’re also likely causing a few sleepless nights in the White House, as the United States’ economic recovery from the unprecedented coronavirus recession hits some bumps.

The jolts are dampening consumer confidence, ramping up inflation fears, and helping Republicans build their case against President Joe Biden and his ambitious plans to revamp the U.S. economy with trillions in new spending.

As the 1970s show, high joblessness and rising prices the United States saw in April can be a potent political force.

Republicans crafted a “misery index” out of the two factors to attack then-president Jimmy Carter. After hitting 75% approval ratings early in his presidency, the Democrat was trounced in a 1980 landslide.

Support for Biden remains strong and U.S. equity markets remain near record highs.

The White House says there’s bound to be surprises as the United States emerges from an unprecedented pandemic.

“We must keep in mind that an economy will not heal instantaneously,” Cecilia Rouse, the chair of the White House Council of Economic Advisers told reporters Friday. “It takes several weeks for people to get full immunity from vaccinations, and even more time for those left jobless from the pandemic to find and start a suitable job.”

Rouse, speaking to reporters at the White House, said a mismatch between supply and demand due to the pandemic and the economic snap-back had pushed inflation higher but that the mismatch should prove temporary.

“I fully expect that will work itself out in the coming months,” she said.

The Federal Reserve also is betting heavily inflation will cool on its own, even as hiring picks up steam over the summer, Americans start to travel again, and the Fed keeps its massive crisis levels of support intact.

The White House wouldn’t offer a timeline for when the economy will smooth out. But it doesn’t expect a repeat of April’s weak jobs report, and recent data show applicants for unemployment benefits fell to a 14-month low.

“The trend lines continue to be positive,” a senior White House official told Reuters on Wednesday. The White House also believes the Fed can handle what comes up, he said.

“We haven’t seen anything that is suggested that the Fed doesn’t have an ample toolkit to manage any of the risks that might present themselves.”

                         ROUGH WATERS AHEAD

Still, there’s more turmoil in months to come.

Republicans, divided by former President Donald Trump’s false claims that the 2020 election was stolen from him, have seized the moment to knock the foundation of Biden’s economic plans – raising taxes on the wealthy and companies.

“You won’t find any Republicans who are gonna go raise taxes. I think that’s the worst thing you can do in this economy,” House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy told reporters outside the White House, citing inflation fears and gas prices.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the powerful corporate lobby group, is pushing for repeal of special unemployment payments that were a cornerstone of Biden’s campaign, and over a dozen state governors have decided to roll them back early.

With 7.5 million more people either unemployed or out of the job market altogether compared to before the pandemic, even a month or two more of weaker-than-expected job growth and rising prices would up the pressure on Biden and the Fed.

“If we get one more April that is concerning,” said Gregory Daco, chief U.S. economist at Oxford Economics.

Some early data suggest that May’s jobs report could be weak as well.

If workers don’t take jobs for whatever reason – continued fear of disease, lack of childcare, and higher-than-usual unemployment benefits have been cited – it would indicate “a significant supply constraint,” Daco said. Then, he said, “the question is how do you get people back? And that is a different question than pumping stimulus into the economy.”

The Biden administration, workers, labor advocates and some economists have argued firms should raise wages if they’re having trouble hiring, and some, including McDonald’s Corp (MCD.N) have followed suit.

Federal Reserve officials concede things could be tricky.

“The question of how to unclog the labor market is going to be a critical one,” and could limit overall economic growth this year if it takes too long, said Richmond Federal Reserve president Thomas Barkin.

                         UNEXPECTED BOTTLENECKS

While “unsticking” the labor market is one challenge, stamping out price flare-ups as Americans return to schools and offices and go on vacation once again is another.

Consumer sentiment in early May tumbled as people worried about rising prices. Inflation expectations for the year ahead and over the next five years rose to their highest in more than a decade.

“You have a logistical challenge of shutting down an economy and bringing it back up and we are not built for that,” Barkin said.

The Colonial Pipeline shutdown that led to gas lines in some southern states had nothing to do with the pandemic, and was lifted Wednesday. But it could take “some time” before it returns to normal, Biden said Thursday.

A semiconductor shortage that started before Biden took office continues to drive up car prices, as pandemic-shy Americans look for alternatives to public transportation.

Home builders point to surging lumber prices they say threaten the critical housing market and the broader economy. Prices for materials used in construction jumped 19.7% from April 2020 to last month, the largest increase in the 35-year history of the series, according to Ken Simonson, the chief economist for the Associated General Contractors of America.

The White House declined to elaborate on specific remedies it might pursue to help the supply side of the economy, but pointed to steps to bring fuel to market after the Colonial Pipeline shutdown.

                         ‘WHIP INFLATION NOW’

Carter and his predecessor Republican Gerald Ford found inflation impossible to beat, but faced more endemic problems in the 1970s.

A Ford push to encourage Americans to save more and spend less, ‘Whip Inflation Now’ or WIN, was an abject failure.

Gas lines then were the result of entrenched geopolitics, not a one-off hack. Inflation was much higher and fed by a country-wide psychology that prices and wages should just keep going up – an important difference that Fed officials are adamant they will not allow to recur.

The country actually added an average of 215,000 jobs monthly during the Carter years. Yet unemployment was rising because so many new workers were joining the labor force, thanks to demographic trends and more women working outside the home for the first time.

Biden faces a very different problem – a job market in the wake of a deadly pandemic that has left workers constrained, nervous, or living off savings and unemployment benefits for now. But that doesn’t mean his job is any easier.