Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Slovakia. Zuzana Čaputová. I liberal iniziano ad averne dei dubbi.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-04-21.

2019-04-19__Slovakia__001

Mrs Zuzana Čaputová è stata eletta presidente della Slovakia.

Zuzana Caputova eletta presidente della Slovakia.

Slovakia. Presidenziali. Caputova 40.04%. Una lezione da meditare.

Slovakia. Mrs Zuzana Caputova potrebbe vincere le elezioni presidenziali.

*

«As populist parties sweep into power across Europe, Slovakia takes a liberal turn by electing a leftist anti-corruption activist from outside the political establishment for president last month»

*

«For a traditional and religious country, electing a woman, a divorced mother living in an informal relationship, and a human rights lawyer holding liberal views on LGBT rights and abortion legislation constitutes a novelty and a shift in attitudes.»

*

«Zuzana Caputova’s victory not only represents a turning point for Slovakia, but also a ray of hope for the region where nationalist, anti-EU and anti-immigration sentiments have grown over the past years.»

*

«While liberals rejoice, some urge caution over the growing support for the far-right in Slovakia, as well as over voting alignment between the ruling SMER-DS and the far-right on social and ethical issues.»

*

«Although some would label Caputova’s triumph as a “victory for liberalism”, it is unclear whether the voters in Slovakia opted for a liberal candidate because they align with liberal values, or because their respect for the rule of law took priority over their personal conservativism when casting a vote»

*

«The two anti-system candidates – the conspirationist former justice minister Stefan Harabin and neo-fascist Marian Kotleba – together attracted nearly a quarter of the votes»

*

«According to the AKO agency opinion poll, public support for Kotleba’s anti-European, far-right People’s Party Our Slovakia (LSNS) rose from 9.5 percent in February to 11.5 percent in April»

*

«In the run up to the elections, the ruling SMER-DS and the far-right LSNS held talks, joined forces and aligned their votes on social and ethical issues, such as to cap retirement age at 64, or to halt ratification of a European treaty designed to combat violence against women. …. In addition to SMER-DS, the Centre-right Slovak National party and the populist We Are Family also held talks with the far-right. …. Considering political pragmatism and lack of consistency displayed by Robert Fico in the past, observers do not exclude that SMER-DS would align with any of the political parties represented in the parliament in order to push its agenda in the future.»

*

«Rather than voting for a woman, observers note, the public voted for the candidate who was credible, independent from the establishment, and who was perceived as capable of bringing about positive change»

*

«The office of the president is largely a ceremonial role in Slovakia, with the real powers of the state being vested in the hands of the prime minister.»

*

«Although the political sands in Slovakia are shifting and it is too early to make any predictions, one could imagine two political blocs consolidating ahead of the 2020 elections: a liberal-democratic one, led by the outgoing president Andrej Kisa and, symbolically, by the president-elect Caputova; and a nationalist bloc with authoritarian-coloured tendencies formed by parties such as SMER-DS, the Slovak National party and the We Are Family, which is connected to Marine Le Pen’s and Matteo Salvini’s ENF group»

* * * * * * *

Stando ai sondaggi eseguiti da Poll of Polls, lo Smer avrebbe il 19.7% e Progresívne Slovensko + Spolu otterrebero il 14.4% dei voti: messi assieme avrebbero il 34.4%, percentuale che non permetterebbe l’ingresso al governo.

Nel converso, Sloboda a Solidarita (Ecr) avrebbe il 12.9%, Ľudová strana – Naše Slovensko, ĽSNS (NI) l’11.5% e Obyčajní Ľudia l’8.6%: in totale raggiungerebbero il 33% dei suffragi. Sme Rodina, 10.7% non è stata conteggiata pur essendo chiaramente populista. Ma se fosse possibile una sinergia, il blocco di destra arriverebbe al 43.7% dei voti.

*

Le prossime elezioni dovrebbero chiarire alla fine la situazione numerica.

In linea generale, però, sembrerebbe prospettarsi un risultato elettorale non favorevole ai liberal.


EU Observer. 2019-04-17. Caputova triumph not yet a victory for Slovak liberalism

For a traditional and religious country, electing a woman, a divorced mother living in an informal relationship, and a human rights lawyer holding liberal views on LGBT rights and abortion legislation constitutes a novelty and a shift in attitudes.

*

As populist parties sweep into power across Europe, Slovakia takes a liberal turn by electing a leftist anti-corruption activist from outside the political establishment for president last month.

For a traditional and religious country, electing a woman, a divorced mother living in an informal relationship, and a human rights lawyer holding liberal views on LGBT rights and abortion legislation constitutes a novelty and a shift in attitudes.

Zuzana Caputova’s victory not only represents a turning point for Slovakia, but also a ray of hope for the region where nationalist, anti-EU and anti-immigration sentiments have grown over the past years.

While liberals rejoice, some urge caution over the growing support for the far-right in Slovakia, as well as over voting alignment between the ruling SMER-DS and the far-right on social and ethical issues.

Victory for liberalism?

Although some would label Caputova’s triumph as a “victory for liberalism”, it is unclear whether the voters in Slovakia opted for a liberal candidate because they align with liberal values, or because their respect for the rule of law took priority over their personal conservativism when casting a vote.

We should not forget about the first round of presidential elections, which revealed the uglier side of Slovak politics.

The two anti-system candidates – the conspirationist former justice minister Stefan Harabin and neo-fascist Marian Kotleba – together attracted nearly a quarter of the votes.

According to the AKO agency opinion poll, public support for Kotleba’s anti-European, far-right People’s Party Our Slovakia (LSNS) rose from 9.5 percent in February to 11.5 percent in April.

In the run up to the elections, the ruling SMER-DS and the far-right LSNS held talks, joined forces and aligned their votes on social and ethical issues, such as to cap retirement age at 64, or to halt ratification of a European treaty designed to combat violence against women.

In addition to SMER-DS, the Centre-right Slovak National party and the populist We Are Family also held talks with the far-right.

Considering political pragmatism and lack of consistency displayed by Robert Fico in the past, observers do not exclude that SMER-DS would align with any of the political parties represented in the parliament in order to push its agenda in the future.

Prime minister Peter Pellegrini, however, rejected any suggestion of a future coalition government with the far-right LSNS.

Gender equality in Slovakia

Observers also caution against jumping to conclusions over how progressive Slovak society is in terms of gender equality and women’s representation in national governments.

According to the 2017 Gender Equality Index of the European Institute for Gender Equality, Slovakia placed third to last among EU members in gender equality, performing on par with Romania and slightly better than Hungary and Greece.

In fact, in the run up to the elections, many doubted that a woman stood a chance of becoming a president in Slovakia.

Rather than voting for a woman, observers note, the public voted for the candidate who was credible, independent from the establishment, and who was perceived as capable of bringing about positive change.

As such, Caputova’s success should be viewed partly as a result of public disillusionment with the governing coalition a year after the killings of an investigative journalist and his fiancee, and partly as an outcome of her campaign, which displayed her authenticity, honesty, empathy, reluctance to undermine other candidates or to use aggressive vocabulary, and a strong record as an activist against injustice.

It was her image of authenticity and political decency that united the divided electorate in Slovakia.

In this regard, Caputova rise and appeal is comparable to that of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in the US Congress.

Beginning of the road to change

The office of the president is largely a ceremonial role in Slovakia, with the real powers of the state being vested in the hands of the prime minister.

Caputova nevertheless committed to ensuring justice for all Slovaks by reinforcing the independence of the public prosecutor’s office and in the naming of judges, which will fall under her responsibility.

Despite the limitations she will face, the symbolic value of her election should not be underestimated.

Caputova victory already boosted her Progressive Slovakia (PS) party’s prospects in EU elections and contributed to the consolidation the liberal camp at home.

Because her victory came at a low turnout of 40 percent, to push her agenda the president-elect will need to work together with, and secure the backing of, the parliament dominated by SMER-DS, led by Fico.

All eyes now turn to the national parliamentary elections, which are due in a year, and which will constitute the real test for the progressive left in Slovakia.

Although the political sands in Slovakia are shifting and it is too early to make any predictions, one could imagine two political blocs consolidating ahead of the 2020 elections: a liberal-democratic one, led by the outgoing president Andrej Kisa and, symbolically, by the president-elect Caputova; and a nationalist bloc with authoritarian-coloured tendencies formed by parties such as SMER-DS, the Slovak National party and the We Are Family, which is connected to Marine Le Pen’s and Matteo Salvini’s ENF group.

Rather than paving the way for a more liberal region, the situation in Slovakia can also take the Austrian turn, where a liberal president finds himself in a difficult position having to balance a right-wing coalition government.

Annunci
Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Zuzana Caputova eletta presidente della Slovakia.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-03-31.

2019-03-31__Zuzana Caputova __001

Nessuno se ne era accorto. Dai fatti si sarebbe detto l’opposto.


Mrs Zuzana Caputova è stata eletta presidente della Slovakia conquistandosi il 58% dei suffragi: una vittoria chiara e netta.

Se è vero che la carica presidenziale in Slovakia sia in gran parte rappresentativa, sarebbe altrettanto vero ponderare con grande cura il contesto in cui tale elezione si è svolta e la personalità della neo-presidente.

*

La Slovakia negli ultimi anni è andata incontro a quel fenomeno di parcellizzazione del quadro politico che sta caratterizzando tutta l’Europa. I partiti tradizionali non richiamano più a lungo Elettori ed i partiti nuovi sulla scena non riescono ancora ad imporsi. Da questo punto di vista la vittoria di Mrs Zuzana Caputova potrebbe essere interpretata come il segno dell’emersione di un partito che possa raggiungere una maggioranza governativa senza dover scendere a compromessi con troppi altri partiti di una coalizione più obbligata che desiderata. Sempre da questa ottica, la chiarezza politica fa aggio sulle tesi propugnate: il chaos partitico è quasi immancabilmente foriero di severi vulnus alla democrazia.

Questa candidatura andata a buon fine ricorda, mutatis mutandis, l’irrompere sul proscenio politico di Mr Macron. In questa fase storica è diventato concretamente possibile che un nuovo partito e nuovi volti possano imporsi fino a conseguire anche la maggioranza. Il fenomeno sembrerebbe essere più ascrivibile al tracollo dei partiti tradizionali che a veementi capacità demagogiche delle nuove formazioni: l’Elettore vuole vedere volti nuovi e sentirsi proporre nuovi traguardi.

Altrettanto sicuramente l’Elettorato, e non solo quello slovacco, sente impellente la necessità di uomini politici ragionevolmente immuni dai fenomeni di corruzione che purtroppo sono stati un fatto costante in questa Europa negli ultimi lustri. Questo concetto potrebbe anche essere esteso. Un certo quale grado di corruzione è sempre insito nella gestione del potere: diventa problema severo quando travalica i limiti del sano buon senso e, soprattutto, quando dalle alte sfere diventa pessima abitudine della minutaglia politica ed amministrativa. L’Elettore medio sembrerebbe essere molto più tollerante verso un governante un po’ troppo spigliato piuttosto che nei confronti del vigile urbano che esige la tangente per non dare le multe di divieto di sosta. In altri termini, conta più il grado di percezione della corruzione che la sua reale entità.

In Slovakia si era assistito anche a fenomeno di rara gravità, quali l’assassinio di Mr Jan Kuciak, un reporter. Al momento, mandanti ed esecutori non sono ancora stati identificati in modo inequivocabile, e ciascuna fazione ne addossa la colpa alle altre. Fatto sta che gli Elettori proprio non ne vogliono più sapere di vivere in una collettività ove sia possibile l’omicidio politico.

Da ultimo, ma non certo per ultimo, si dovrebbe far notare la grande differenza che intercorre tra la conquista ed il mantenimento del potere. Il Macbeth di Shakespeare illustra ad arte questo problema. L’esperienza italiana del M5S  dovrebbe insegnare. Al momento, in questa particolare Europa, è abbastanza facile coagulare consensi attorno a degli slogan che soddisfino visceralmente l’Elettorato, ma una formazione politica che si contraddistingua per i ‘NO’ e per le dichiarazioni utopiche può forse raggiungere il potere, ma non riesce a mantenerlo: si disgrega rapidamente. Non solo. Per governare serve non solo il vasto consenso popolare, ma anche la disponibilità di persone che siano in grado di ricoprire tutta la sfaccettatura di governo e sottogoverno che la formazione politica deve occupare e dar significato. Se è facile proporsi come ‘anticorruzione’ è terribilmente difficile agire da elementi isolati, senza il pieno governo dell’apparato burocratico dello stato. Gli Elettori conferiscono un mandato, ma sono anche molto esigenti nell’esigere che esso sia portato a buon fine.

Se sicuramente la Caputova può al momento contare su solidi appoggi in sede dell’Unione Europea, altrettanto sicuramente è ancora debole patria e nulla vieta di pensare che con le prossime elezioni europee le vengano a mancare gli appoggi internazionali.

*

Vedremo come si comporterà Mrs Zuzana Caputova nel suo nuovo ruolo di presidente dello stato.

Se questa elezione costituisce sicuramente un valido precedente, altrettanto sicuramente si dovrebbe tener conto di altri fenomeni in atto in questa Europa dilaniata dal travaglio delle prossime elezioni europee.

Romania. Arrestata Laura Kövesi, candidata di Juncker a capo della Procura Europea.

Il caso della Kövesi non riguarda soltanto i fatti interni della Romania, bensì gli equilibri fluttuanti all’interno dell’Unione Europea e, più in generale, della situazione politica mondiale.

Se nulla vieta di pensare che l’elezione di Mrs Zuzana Caputova sia l’inizio di un rinnovamento, nulla vieterebbe di pensare che anche l’arresto della Kövesi sia solo il primo di una lunga lista.

*


Ansa. 2019-03-31. Slovacchia: Zuzana Caputova presidente

Comprensibilità, cordialità, affidabilità, capacità di evitare conflitti: queste le caratteristiche che hanno portato Zuzana Caputova, fino a poco tempo fa poco nota all’opinione pubblica, ad essere eletta presidente della Slovacchia.

“Sono felice del risultato – ha detto Caputova, dopo aver ringraziato i suoi elettori – perché si vede che nella politica si può entrare con opinioni proprie e la fiducia si può conquistare anche senza linguaggio aggressivo e colpi bassi. L’onestà nella politica può essere la nostra forza”. 

La 45enne, ex vicepresidente del piccolo partito non governativo ‘Slovacchia progressista’, è entrata in politica nel 2017 dopo la lotta durata anni contro una discarica illegale a Pezinok che l’ha messa contro gli uomini al potere e imprenditori controversi.

Nel ballottaggio, Caputova ha vinto con il 58% dei consensi sull’eurodeputato Maros Sefcovic, che si è fermato al 42% e ha riconosciuto la vittoria della avversaria. L’affluenza alle urne è stata del 41,8%.

*


Bbc. 2019-03-31. Zuzana Caputova becomes Slovakia’s first female president

Anti-corruption candidate Zuzana Caputova has won Slovakia’s presidential election, making her the country’s first female head of state.

Ms Caputova, who has almost no political experience, defeated high-profile diplomat Maros Sefcovic, nominated by the governing party, in a second round run-off vote.

She framed the election as a struggle between good and evil.

The election follows the murder of an investigative journalist last year.

Jan Kuciak was looking into links between politicians and organised crime when he was shot alongside his fiancée in February 2018.

Ms Caputova cited Mr Kuciak’s death as one of the reasons she decided to run for president, which is a largely ceremonial role.

With almost all votes counted, she has won about 58% to Mr Sefcovic’s 42%.

She gained prominence as a lawyer, when she led a case against an illegal landfill lasting 14 years.

Aged 45, a divorcee and mother of two, she is a member of the liberal Progressive Slovakia party, which has no seats in parliament.

In a country where same-sex marriage and adoption is not yet legal, her liberal views promote LGBTQ+ rights.

Anti-corruption candidate leads Slovak poll

The political novice bucking Europe’s populist trend

The opponent she defeated, Mr Sefcovic, is vice president of the European Commission.

He was nominated by the ruling Smer-SD party, which is led by Robert Fico, who was forced to resign as prime minister following the Kuciak murder.

In the first voting round, Ms Caputova won 40% of the vote, with Mr Sefcovic gaining less than 19%.