Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Malta mette nei triboli il rule-of-law dell’europarlamento.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2020-01-14.

Unione Europea 013

«While Poland’s government is escalating its rule of law crisis by introducing even more drastic measures against the country’s judges, another problem is looming over the EU’s commitment to upholding the rule of law: Malta»

«Ever since the murder of journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia and the following investigation – or rather the lack of it, it seems clear that something is foul in the state of Malta»

«The European Parliament demanded that the EU Commission launches a rule of law dialogue, a first step towards an Article 7 procedure that could end in Malta losing voting rights in the EU»

«After two years of standstill, the inquiry jumpstarted last month with shocking revelations concerning the involvement of the members of the Maltese government and a swirl of questions regarding the role of prime minister Joseph Muscat, who declared that he will step down this month.»

«His innocence and his competence in overseeing law enforcement are in doubt»

«Yet, Malta’s problems are not easily comparable to those in Poland and Hungary. They are worse in some respects and better in others»

«It is not a matter of authoritarianism. It is worse, however, because weaknesses in its rule of law and serious problems with corruption at high government levels have resulted in the brazen murder of a journalist»

«On paper, the president appoints the judges and the chief justice of Malta on the basis of advice by the prime minister.

In reality, the president only rubberstamps the prime minister’s picks»

«Despite the recommendations from the EU and Council of Europe’s Venice Commission towards establishing a stronger mechanism towards ensuring checks and balances in judicial appointments, no independent body of judicial self-governance ensures that judges exercise of power over their own matters»

«In Portugal, former prime minister Jose Socrates is facing charges of corruption, even though his own party is in government»

«In the Czech Republic, prime minister Andrej Babis faces investigation»

«In contrast, in Poland, where virtually the entire law enforcement is centred around the minister of Jjustice Zbigniew Ziobro who is also the prosecutor general, investigations into alleged crimes and misdemeanours by politicians from the ruling party are initiated – and then, dropped»

«In Hungary, the misuse of EU’s taxpayers’ money by well-connected people has been pointed out by EU agencies but the Hungarian authorities have not charged any»

«The dialogue might seem as a light measure, but it in fact is the first step on the road to triggering the Article 7 procedure. …. One should not overuse it, as the possibility of ultimately depriving a member state of its vote in the Council is not something to be invoked lightly»

* * * * * * *

Il problema è la nomina dei giudici.

Nella civilissima Germania, per esempio, la Corte Costituzionale è formato da sedici giudici eletti per metà dai membri del Bundestag e per metà dal Bundesrat. La durata della carica è fissata a 12 anni: termina comunque al raggiungimento dell’età di 68 anni.

In Germania non esiste un organo di autogoverno della magistratura affine al CSM italiano. La nomina dei magistrati addetti ai tribunali federali incombe così al Ministro federale competente in materia (Giustizia, Lavoro, Finanze, ecc.). I provvedimenti disciplinari contro giudici e procuratori federali possono essere assunti solo nel caso in cui, a seguito di una richiesta del Bundestag in tal senso, il Tribunale costituzionale abbia accertato un comportamento doloso del singolo magistrato, con decisione presa da almeno i 2/3 dei suoi componenti.

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Come si vede, i giudici in Germania sono tutti di nomina politica: ogni popolo ha le sue tradizioni anche per le istituzioni giuridiche. Non solo: la politica ha la potestà di rimuovere i giudici.

Ci si domanda, per quale motivo un simile criterio non possa essere seguito anche da altri stati afferenti l’Unione Europea.

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EuObserver. 2020-01-06. Maltese murder – the next rule-of-law crisis in EU?

While Poland’s government is escalating its rule of law crisis by introducing even more drastic measures against the country’s judges, another problem is looming over the EU’s commitment to upholding the rule of law: Malta.

Ever since the murder of journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia and the following investigation – or rather the lack of it, it seems clear that something is foul in the state of Malta.

The European Parliament demanded that the EU Commission launches a rule of law dialogue, a first step towards an Article 7 procedure that could end in Malta losing voting rights in the EU.

It may be too early though.

After two years of standstill, the inquiry jumpstarted last month with shocking revelations concerning the involvement of the members of the Maltese government and a swirl of questions regarding the role of prime minister Joseph Muscat, who declared that he will step down this month.

His innocence and his competence in overseeing law enforcement are in doubt.

Yet, Malta’s problems are not easily comparable to those in Poland and Hungary. They are worse in some respects and better in others.

In contrast to Poland and Hungary, in Malta, no ruling party or government is trying to systematically subjugate the judiciary in order to exert political control over it.

It is not a matter of authoritarianism. It is worse, however, because weaknesses in its rule of law and serious problems with corruption at high government levels have resulted in the brazen murder of a journalist.

Where does that put the European Union? The current toolbox for preventing the backsliding of the rule of law assumes that the EU reacts to ‘systemic’ issues with the rule of law.

Malta has such issues, as the Venice Commission of the Council of Europe already pointed out in December 2018.

It stressed, in particular, the lack of proper checks and balances, stating that “Taking also into account the prime ministers strong position in judicial appointments (…), crucial checks and balances are missing.”

The prime minister holds the bulk of executive power with the president being more akin to his counterpart in Germany. On paper, the president appoints the judges and the chief justice of Malta on the basis of advice by the prime minister.

In reality, the president only rubberstamps the prime minister’s picks. Despite the recommendations from the EU and Council of Europe’s Venice Commission towards establishing a stronger mechanism towards ensuring checks and balances in judicial appointments, no independent body of judicial self-governance ensures that judges exercise of power over their own matters.

Size matters

Malta can solve its legal and institutional challenges, but there is a challenge, which it cannot solve – its size.

With a population just shy of 500,000, it is no bigger than a medium-sized city in Germany or the UK. And in politics, close connections count.

Networks, be it familial, friendly or professional, are dense. When we talk about the judiciary in Poland, we talk about 10,000 judges. Malta has 24 judges, 22 magistrates, and one chief justice.

You can gather the upper echelons of Malta’s three branches of government at a garden party. This level of proximity makes it even more imperative to strengthen institutional checks and balances.

A country that respects the rule of law can prosecute the powerful.

In Portugal, former prime minister Jose Socrates is facing charges of corruption, even though his own party is in government.

In the Czech Republic, prime minister Andrej Babis faces investigation.

In contrast, in Poland, where virtually the entire law enforcement is centred around the minister of Jjustice Zbigniew Ziobro who is also the prosecutor general, investigations into alleged crimes and misdemeanours by politicians from the ruling party are initiated – and then, dropped.

In Hungary, the misuse of EU’s taxpayers’ money by well-connected people has been pointed out by EU agencies but the Hungarian authorities have not charged anybody.

The sudden momentum behind the Galizia case may suggest that Malta can solve its issues by itself after all.

If the European Commission wants to wait a bit longer, it should, however, make it clear to Maltese partners that a swift resolution of criminal cases, together with an overall strengthening of checks and balances in line with the Venice Commission recommendations, is the only way to avoid the start of the pre-Article 7 dialogue.

The dialogue might seem as a light measure, but it in fact is the first step on the road to triggering the Article 7 procedure.

One should not overuse it, as the possibility of ultimately depriving a member state of its vote in the Council is not something to be invoked lightly.

But if Malta will find itself unable to handle the murder of Daphne Caruana Galizia and will thus prove that its constitutional system has indeed eroded to the point where the country is unable to respect the rights of its citizens, entering a rule of law framework dialogue followed by the eventual triggering of the article 7 procedure against Malta would become unavoidable.

Pubblicato in: Cina, Devoluzione socialismo

Merkel fa le bucce alla Cina in una lectio magistralis. La replica cinese.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-09-09.

2019-09-09__Merkel_Cina__001

Se Mr Xi fosse andato in Germania a tenere un conferenza in cui avesse asserito che l’ideologia liberal socialista fosse cosa criminale e che il sovranismo identitario fosse il meglio, verosimilmente i tedeschi lo avrebbero messo alla porta in un amen.

Frau Merkel se ne è andata in visita in Cina, ricevuta non da Mr Xi, bensì da Mr Li Keqiang, premier ma non capo dello stato: non ha saputo resistere alla tentazione di tenere ai cinesi una lezione su come dovrebbero pensare e comportarsi. I cinesi hanno ascoltato in dignitoso silenzio, senza rilasciare alla fine un commento ufficiale.

Questo è uno dei comportamenti di Frau Merkel che indispettiscono i suoi interlocutori.

Solo un giornale cinese ha sommessamente ricordato come il sistema economico tedesco sia nei triboli: ma lo ha fatto con il solito garbo orientale. Casualmente, un giornale di secondo piano ha dedicato un ampio articolo al Piano Morgenthau.  A seguito, la risposta ufficiale cinese.

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«German Chancellor Angela Merkel has underlined the importance of international cooperation on both global warming and global trade in a speech to Chinese students»

«She also criticized China’s social credit system»

«German Chancellor Angela Merkel took China to task, albeit diplomatically, over its climate record on the second day of her latest visit to the world’s second-biggest economy.»

«Speaking to students at Huazhong University in the city of Wuhan, Merkel said “climate protection is everyone’s responsibility” and that given China’s size and power, the world needed an important contribution from it»

«Merkel also questioned whether China should still be considered a developing country, given the speed at which it has modernized in recent years»

«The chancellor used her speech to reiterate her commitment to multilateralism, insisting that common rules were essential in a globalized world, while “protectionism hurts us all»

«the chancellor said China’s rise to become one of the most important players in the world also meant it had greater responsibilities when it came to human rights and safeguarding the rule of law»

«I indicated during the talks that the rights and freedoms agreed upon in Hong Kong’s Basic Law should be safeguarded»

«I have advocated that conflicts be resolved without violence and that anything else would be a catastrophe from my point of view»

«I indicated during the talks that the rights and freedoms agreed upon in Hong Kong’s Basic Law should be safeguarded»

«China’s social credit information system …. Merkel told the students that in Europe the system was viewed as a bad idea because data privacy was considered a human right»

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Per comparazione, riportiamo l’articolo relativo comparso su Xinhuanet.

German Chancellor Merkel visits central China’s Wuhan

«Angela Merkel Saturday visited central China’s Wuhan during her 12th trip to the country as German Chancellor since 2005.

Before Wuhan, capital city of Hubei province, Merkel had visited a number of cities besides Beijing during her China trips in the past.

When talking with students of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Merkel highlighted the importance of international cooperation in the era of globalization, and called on the students to be participants.

Saying that a nation’s prosperity is part of the prosperity of the whole world, she voiced her hope that students should shoulder common responsibilities to combat global challenges.

In the speech, Merkel reviewed her past trips to China. In Shenyang, she witnessed economic upgrading. In Chengdu she learned about development of western China. In Shenzhen she saw remarkable progress brought by the reform and opening-up.

She said quite a few noted German companies including Siemens, and small and medium-sized innovation enterprises are operating business in Wuhan. Wuhan and Duisburg became the first pair of sister cities between China and Germany in 1982.

Merkel exchanged views with students on internet, artificial intelligence, intelligent manufacturing, and environmental protection.

Before wrapping up her trip, Merkel also visited a local hospital and a factory of the German company Webasto.»

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Niente da dire che i cinesi conoscano bene l’arte diplomatica.

* * * * * * *


Germany’s Angela Merkel urges China to do more for climate

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has underlined the importance of international cooperation on both global warming and global trade in a speech to Chinese students. She also criticized China’s social credit system.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel took China to task, albeit diplomatically, over its climate record on the second day of her latest visit to the world’s second-biggest economy.

Speaking to students at Huazhong University in the city of Wuhan, Merkel said “climate protection is everyone’s responsibility” and that given China’s size and power, the world needed an important contribution from it.

Merkel also questioned whether China should still be considered a developing country, given the speed at which it has modernized in recent years.

Multilateralism and human rights

The chancellor used her speech to reiterate her commitment to multilateralism, insisting that common rules were essential in a globalized world, while “protectionism hurts us all.” She added that China’s new economic power was itself an illustration of the success of the world’s multilateral trade system.

At the same time, the chancellor said China’s rise to become one of the most important players in the world also meant it had greater responsibilities when it came to human rights and safeguarding the rule of law.

That echoed comments Merkel made following her meeting with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, when she called for a peaceful resolution to the ongoing unrest in Hong Kong. “I indicated during the talks that the rights and freedoms agreed upon in Hong Kong’s Basic Law should be safeguarded,” she said Friday. 

The chancellor took up the issue again on Saturday, saying, “I have advocated that conflicts be resolved without violence and that anything else would be a catastrophe from my point of view.”

Controversial social credit system

The chancellor’s speech in Wuhan also included some criticism of China’s social credit system, which allows the state to evaluate economic and social creditworthiness of both individuals and businesses using personal online data.

China’s social credit information system authority said that some 20 million of the country’s 1.3 billion people had been banned from air and train travel in 2018 because their credit scores were too low.

Merkel told the students that in Europe the system was viewed as a bad idea because data privacy was considered a human right.

The EU Chamber of Commerce in China warned European companies in late August that they would need to ramp up preparations for the social credit system.

But Merkel’s trips to China always include a large business contingent, because of the country’s huge importance as a market for German businesses.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Bulgaria, EU, von der Leyen ed il rule of law.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-09-05.

Bulgaria 001

Dal 1° dicembre 2000 la Bulgaria fa parte della Nato e dal 1° gennaio 2007 dell’Unione Europea.

Nel 2001 la Bulgaria aveva un pil di 14.076 miliardi Usd ed un pil procapite di 1,784 Usd. A fine 2018 il pil era salito di oltre quattro volte al valore di 64.963 mld e quello procapite a 9,267 Usd. Il pil ppa vale 23,155 Usd.

2019-09-03__Bulgaria__001

«GDP grows 3.1% in Bulgaria

Gross Domestic Product of Bulgaria grew 3.1% in 2018 compared to last year. This rate is 7 -tenths of one percent less than the figure of 3.8% published in 2017.

The GDP figure in 2018 was $64,963 million, Bulgaria is number 75 in the ranking of GDP of the 196 countries that we publish. The absolute value of GDP in Bulgaria rose $6,628 million with respect to 2017.

The GDP per capita of Bulgaria in 2018 was $9,267, $993 higher than in 2017, it was $8,274. To view the evolution of the GDP per capita, it is interesting to look back a few years and compare these data with those of 2008 when the GDP per capita in Bulgaria was $7,153.

If we order the countries according to their GDP per capita, Bulgaria is in 75th position of the 196 countries whose GDP we publish.»

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La Bulgaria sta svolgendo un ruolo politico ed economico di peso sempre maggiore.

«Il partito conservatore filo-europeista Gerb, guidato dal premier Boyko Borissov, ha vinto le elezioni politiche di domenica 26 marzo con il 33,55% dei voti. Al secondo posto si è collocato il Partito socialista di Kornelia Ninova, con poco più del 27,02% dei voti»

Mr Borissov è prima bulgaro poi europeo, e sarebbe ben difficile dargli torno.  In particolare si è più volte scontrato con la componente liberal socialista europea, che lo accusa di violare il rule of law così come di corruzione.

Non si vuole di proposito entrare nel merito, ma quando un governante quadruplica il pil in diciotto anni avrebbe a buon diritto acquisito il titolo a percepire uno stipendio fantasmagorico.

Kristalina Georgieva candidata EU all’Imf. Nominata con voti sovranisti.

Bruxelles. Laura Kövesi. Ricordatevi bene questo nome.

La lobby romena alla Ue che frena Laura Kövesi alla Procura europea

Anche la Bulgaria non firma il Patto Un sui migranti.

Convenzione di Istanbul. Bulgaria, Slovakia ed altri paesi la rifiutano.

Borisov, Presidente Consiglio EU bacchetta la dirigenza sulla Polonia.

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Questo il mesto titolo di una testata ultra liberal

Bulgaria: Why did von der Leyen endorse bad politics?

Cattiva politica” significa in quel giornale una politica che non condivide gli ideali liberal socialisti.

È ‘corrotto‘ colui che non lascia pascolare i liberal socialisti.

«On 29 August, the president-elect of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, paid a visit to Bulgaria to discuss the country’s expectations vis-a-vis the new commission and to seek prime minister Boyko Borissov’s support.»

«Her trip will be remembered with her unjust praise for Borissov’s government and the fact that for the first time in Bulgaria journalists were not allowed to ask any questions at a press conference with an EU leader»

«It has been reported that journalists’ microphones were taken away with von der Leyen’s approval.»

«The fragile state of Bulgaria’s rule of law is a delicate matter, so Bulgaria’s economy may have looked like a safe bet.»

«She was very impressed that, in Bulgaria, there was significant investment in schools and universities and that teacher salaries were high.»

«She was pleased that Bulgaria had the highest GDP growth it had seen.»

«Bulgaria’s GDP growth may appear impressive only if the number is examined out of context.

The Bulgarian Industrial Association has calculated that, since 2007, foreign direct investment has fallen 10 times in absolute terms.

Most growth can be attributed to EU funds.»

«In other words, the EU finances an autocracy, but there is also a caveat.

EU funds flow to the economy on paper, but, in practice, they get deviated to private pockets. »

«Borissov used the second person singular to address the president-elect.

The Bulgarian language is conservative, and proper grammar is a sign of respect – on formal occasions, Bulgarians address each other and foreigners in the second person plural.»

* * * * * * *

Il testo riportato dovrebbe essere auto esplicativo.

Mrs Ursula von der Leyen prende atto che alle elezioni europee i liberal socialisti hanno perso un centinaio di deputati e, con essi, la maggioranza: lei infatti è stata eletta con i voti dei sovranisti, mica con quelli dei liberal.

È evidente come Mrs von der Leyen non sia per nulla infastidita della politica economica perseguita dalla Bulgaria, anzi, si direbbe proprio l’opposto.

Aver tolto il microfono ad un giornalista che lo stava usando in modo improprio sarebbe più questione di buon senso che di politica.

Poi, ma chi si credono di essere i giornalisti?

Vogliono fare politica? Perfetto. Si facciano eleggere, se ci riescono. I tempi stanno cambiando.


EU Observer. 2019-09-03. Bulgaria: Why did von der Leyen endorse bad politics?

On 29 August, the president-elect of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, paid a visit to Bulgaria to discuss the country’s expectations vis-a-vis the new commission and to seek prime minister Boyko Borissov’s support.

Her trip will be remembered with her unjust praise for Borissov’s government and the fact that for the first time in Bulgaria journalists were not allowed to ask any questions at a press conference with an EU leader.

It has been reported that journalists’ microphones were taken away with von der Leyen’s approval.

What went wrong?

Safety first

One may reasonably suspect that von der Leyen’s advisors tried very hard to find positive developments in Bulgaria which she could compliment as a form of courtesy towards her hosts.

The fragile state of Bulgaria’s rule of law is a delicate matter, so Bulgaria’s economy may have looked like a safe bet.

At the press conference following her meeting with Borissov, von der Leyen said that when she looked at Bulgaria, she saw “a country which prosper[ed]”.

She was very impressed that, in Bulgaria, there was significant investment in schools and universities and that teacher salaries were high.

She was pleased that Bulgaria had the highest GDP growth it had seen.

But von der Leyen’s statements merit some unpacking and fact-checking.

Anatomy of prosperity

The traditional definition of prosperity is “a state of economic well-being”.

Bulgaria has the lowest GDP per capita, the lowest minimum wage, and the lowest median earnings in the EU.

According to World Bank data, 22 percent of Bulgarians live below the poverty line.

Recently, Bulgarian teachers had a raise – currently, the average teacher salary after tax is €500/month.

However, it has been estimated that a family of four needs €1,224/month just for basic expenses.

In the latest studies, Bulgarian students performed significantly below the average in all categories -science, mathematics, reading – compared to other countries in the Paris-based club of nations, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

Bulgaria has one of the lowest research & development government expenditures as a percent of GDP in the EU, as visible from Eurostat data.

Bulgaria also has one of the lowest researchers to inhabitants ratio in Europe, according to UNESCO statistics.

And there are no Bulgarian universities in the first European University Networks approved by the European Commission.

Myth of growth

Bulgaria’s GDP growth may appear impressive only if the number is examined out of context.

The Bulgarian Industrial Association has calculated that, since 2007, foreign direct investment has fallen 10 times in absolute terms.

Most growth can be attributed to EU funds.

Based on publicly available data, I have estimated that Bulgaria has one of the highest GDP to EU funds ratio in the EU – 4.91 percent.

Even Hungary, which is usually treated as a leader in receiving EU funds, has a lower ratio – 4.59 percent.

In other words, the EU finances an autocracy, but there is also a caveat.

EU funds flow to the economy on paper, but, in practice, they get deviated to private pockets.

A series of investigations by Bivol, the Bulgarian partner of the Organised Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, a journalistic club, provide ample illustrations of these abuses of EU finances.

Awkward press conference

Beyond von der Leyen’s assertions about the economy, which surely angered many Bulgarians, for they do not reflect reality, one could not help but notice that Borissov used the second person singular to address the president-elect.

The Bulgarian language is conservative, and proper grammar is a sign of respect – on formal occasions, Bulgarians address each other and foreigners in the second person plural.

One may wonder if this is any indication of who had more bargaining power at this meeting.

By agreeing with Borissov not to answer questions by journalists, von der Leyen unwittingly contributed to the suffocation of media in Bulgaria.

The latest World Press Freedom Index by the NGO Reporters Without Borders has ranked Bulgaria 111th in the world after Kuwait and Angola.

Questions remain

Over the summer, von der Leyen stressed that “nobody was perfect” when it came to the rule of law.

She also seems comfortable receiving the support of states with a proven corruption record like Bulgaria.

This philosophy surely worries experts who believe that we have reached a “make or break” moment to uphold the rule of law in the EU.

While it is easy to take the microphone away from a journalist, especially in Bulgaria, many questions will eventually catch up with the new commission president.

For instance: what is the price of the rule of law in the EU?; how does her team gather country information?; how much does she value transparency?; is she worried about the misuse of EU funds?; is prosperity a new EU synonym for poverty in Brussels?

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Giustizia, Ong - Ngo, Unione Europea

Europarlamento. L’arte di sapersi conquistare i nemici.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-07-22.

Razzismo 001

Il problema dovrebbe essere semplice, sempre che come tale lo si voglia vedere. Servirebbe anche un pochino di onestà intellettuale.

Una cosa è l’ingerenza della politica nella formulazione delle sentenze emesse dalle corti di giustizia ed una totalmente differente è il fatto che la politica nomini i giudici, come avviene, per esempio, negli Stati Uniti di America, in Francia ed in Germania, solo per fare alcuni esempi. Una cosa ancora differente è quando il potere giudiziario interferisce con quello politico.

Le sinistre europarlamentari fanno volutamente ed artatamente di tutt’erba un fascio, generando così confusione dalla quale rafforzare il proprio potere. Vogliono cercare di governare i paesi identitari sovranisti tramite il sistema giudiziario e la presenza sul loro territorio delle ngo. Non riuscendo ad avere una quota elettorale decente, usano questi sistemi.

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Polonia: l’Ue insiste nel pressing sullo stato di diritto

La Commissione europea ha compiuto il secondo passo in una procedura d’infrazione contro la Polonia, inviando un parere motivato sullo stato di diritto, e più in particolare, sul nuovo regime disciplinare per i giudici polacchi. Si legge in una nota dell’Esecutivo comunitario. Varsavia ha avuto due mesi per rispondere agli argomenti presentati dalla Commissione nella sua lettera di messa in mora. Ma a seguito di un’analisi approfondita della risposta delle autorità polacche, la Commissione ha concluso che “la risposta non allevia le preoccupazioni giuridiche”. Le autorità polacche ora hanno due mesi per adottare le misure necessarie per conformarsi al parere motivato inviato oggi. Se Varsavia non adotterà le misure appropriate, la Commissione può decidere di deferire il caso alla Corte di giustizia dell’Ue. 

Il 3 aprile 2019, Bruxelles aveva avviato questa procedura d’infrazione sostenendo che il nuovo regime disciplinare mina l’indipendenza giudiziaria dei giudici polacchi e non assicura le necessarie garanzie per proteggere i giudici dal controllo della politica. Tra le altre cose – si legge nella nota della Commissione Ue – “la legge polacca permette che i giudici ordinari siano sottoposti a indagini disciplinari, procedure e sanzioni sulla base del contenuto delle loro decisioni giudiziarie. Inoltre, le nuove regole non garantiscono l’indipendenza e l’imparzialità della Camera disciplinare della Corte suprema, composta solo da giudici selezionati dal Consiglio nazionale per la magistratura, che è a sua volta nominato dal Parlamento polacco”.

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Si noti come l’ordinamento polacco sia simile a quello germanico.

«Corte Costituzionale Tedesca.

La nomina dei 16 giudici compete per metà al Bundestag (il parlamento federale) e per metà al Bundesrat (la camera che rappresenta i Länder). Il Bundestag designa i giudici di propria competenza attraverso un comitato di 12 grandi elettori, di cui fanno parte parlamentari eletti dalla medesima camera con metodo proporzionale, che delibera con la maggioranza dei due terzi dei voti. ….

La durata della carica è fissata a 12 anni, ma termina comunque al raggiungimento dell’età di 68 anni,»

Sia in Germania sia in Polonia la Corte Suprema è nominata dai politici eletti: ma per l’europarlamento ciò che va bene in Germania è antidemocratico in Polonia.

Il nodo è ben differente, ed in parte è stato già enucleato. Dobbiamo però aggiunge un’altra componente di non poco valore.

I liberal socialisti odiano di violento odio razziale polacchi ed ungheresi, rei di non essersi sottoposti ai loro voleri, di essersi ribellati al loro piano egemone: questi liberal socialisti nulla hanno da invidiare al nazionalsocialismo di infausta memoria.

Di oggi un nuovo sfregio: la ricusazione di Mrs Beata Szydlo perché polacca.

Non ci si stupisca poi se votando nel Consiglio Europeo Polonia ed Ungheria, assieme a molti altri stati, boccino sistematicamente quanto proposto dall’europarlamento. Per esempio, il bilancio ….

EP employment committee elects Slovak chairwoman

The members of the European Parliament’s employment committee elected Slovak MEP Lucia Duris Nicholsonova as chairwoman on Thursday. Nicholsonova was put forward by the European Conservatives and Reformists (ECR) group after their Beata Szydlo, former Polish PM, was twice rejected, leading to a spat where Szydlo’s PiS party initially refused to back Commission president candidate Ursula von der Leyen. Nicholsonova received 38 votes in favour and 14 against.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Unione Europea, Commissione uscente e Visegrad.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-07-19.

unione europea 001

La maggioranza europarlamentare tra Ppe ed S&D è crollata sotto il peso delle sue contraddizioni.

Contravvenendo alle più elementari regole di buon vivere politico, la Commissione Europea uscente tenta ora il colpo grosso nei confronti dei paesi del Visegrad, rei di aver destabilizzato il vecchio status quo europeo.

La Commissione di Mr Juncker vorrebbe poter arrivare ad escludere Polonia ed Ungheria dal Consiglio Europeo, così da suggellare con questo atto la propria fuoriuscita dalla scena politica.

Oggetto del contendere è il rule of law, termine con il quale i liberal socialisti intendono l’asservimento ideologico dei giudici alla loro ideologia, mezzo oltremodo potente per poter dominare situazioni nelle quali non siano riusciti a conquistarsi una supremazia elettorale.

Questo problema è sentito in molti paesi europei, ma specialmente in Polonia ed in Ungheria.

I loro tribunali, ivi comprese le relative corti costituzionali, sono occupate in gran parte da giudici ideologicamente schierati, che si ingegnano a fare tutto il loro possibile per ostacolare i legittimi governi in carica, legittimamente eletti.

«The European Commission is to propose annual rule-of-law checks on all EU states amid tensions with Hungary, Poland, and Romania»

«Its proposal, to be unveiled in Brussels on Wednesday (17 July), is to model the legal screening on the annual fiscal reviews carried out by EU officials on national debt and deficits»

«It would also include a yearly high-level EU conference on rule of law with NGOs and academics to highlight abuse»

«The proposal comes after EU institutions triggered sanctions procedures against Hungary and Poland for meddling with their courts and other abuses of EU democratic norms»

«The sanctions could, in theory, see Hungary and Poland’s votes suspended in the EU Council»

«But such a move would require unanimity, with Budapest and Warsaw pledging to veto each other’s punishments, and with Lithuania’s new president Gitanas Nauseda, also promising to shield Poland»

* * * * * * *

Staremo a vedere come si articoleranno gli eventi.

Una cosa sembrerebbe però emergere chiaramente: ben difficilmente il Consiglio Europeo voterebbe a maggioranza assoluta la sospensione di paesi quali la Polonia e la Ungheria.


EU Observer. 2019-07-17. Poland ‘optimistic’ despite new EU law checks

The European Commission is to propose annual rule-of-law checks on all EU states amid tensions with Hungary, Poland, and Romania.

Its proposal, to be unveiled in Brussels on Wednesday (17 July), is to model the legal screening on the annual fiscal reviews carried out by EU officials on national debt and deficits, according to the Reuters news agency.

It would also include a yearly high-level EU conference on rule of law with NGOs and academics to highlight abuse, Reuters added.

EU interior ministers are likely to discuss the idea when they meet in Brussels on Thursday.

The proposal comes after EU institutions triggered sanctions procedures against Hungary and Poland for meddling with their courts and other abuses of EU democratic norms.

The European Commission also warned Romania on sanctions and won a court injunction to stop Poland firing its Supreme Court judges.

The sanctions could, in theory, see Hungary and Poland’s votes suspended in the EU Council.

But such a move would require unanimity, with Budapest and Warsaw pledging to veto each other’s punishments, and with Lithuania’s new president Gitanas Nauseda, also promising to shield Poland.

“We should not be pursuing the path of sanctions, but the path of a better mutual understanding,” Nauseda said in Warsaw on Tuesday.

The sanctions threats were a “form of oppression”, Polish president Andrzej Duda added.

Hungary and Poland had previously complained they were being singled out unfairly and the proposed annual reviews of all 28 EU countries could help to take the heat off their administrations.

Acting as a bloc with the Czech Republic and Slovakia, they lobbied against the nomination of Dutch commissioner Frans Timmermans – who oversaw the EU sanctions process – to be the next commission chief.

The German minister who got the post on Tuesday, Ursula von der Leyen, has also said she would take a hard line, including EU budget cuts for unruly capitals.

Timmermans’ future role in her commission remains uncertain, however.

She also had to rely on the votes of MEPs from Poland’s ruling party, Law and Justice (PiS), in order to secure her nomination in a European Parliament vote.

And for his part, the Polish prime minister, Mateusz Morawiecki, hinted in Berlin on Tuesday that there was a quid pro quo.

He said Poland had wanted a commission chief who “built bridges” instead of one [Timmermans] who “lectures, scolds, divides, and creates conflicts in Europe”.

German chancellor Angela Merkel had earlier phoned him to solicit PiS’ support for von der Leyen, Morawiecki told press alongside Merkel in the German capital.

“I am a cautious optimist. I believe we will have a partner on the other side completely different from the one [Timmermans] who posed a threat to central Europe by his lack of understanding and unfair treatment of Poland,” Morawiecki added.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Europarlamento. Mica è detto che ratifichi la von der Leyen.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-07-04

3.

Durer Albrecht. Quattro cavallieri dell'Apocalisse. 1498.

«Poland and other countries of the V4 group are “definitely against” the candidacy of Frans Timmermans for the position of the President of the European Commission, PM Mateusz Morawiecki said at a briefing in Brussels.
At the EU summit convened to fill in the block’s top offices, Poland has been opting for candidates who favor compromise, Morawiecki added. » [The Warsaw Voice]

*

«Amid far-right alliance dreams, Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán no longer supports Manfred Weber’s bid to be European Commission president. Speaking in Budapest alongside Austrian Vice Chancellor Heinz-Christian Strache, leader of the far-right Freedom Party (FPÖ), Orbán criticized Weber’s pledge not to accept the position of Commission president if his success depended on the support of Hungary’s ruling Fidesz party» [Free Hungary]

*

“No a Timmermans”, Conte con i ribelli sul carro di Visegrad

* * * * * * *

Il Consiglio Europeo, ossia l’assise dei capi di stato o di governo dei 28 paesi membri delibera a maggioranza qualificata i candidati alle cariche europee apicali, candidature che poi il parlamento europeo è chiamato a ratificare o meno. Se non le approvasse, tutta la procedura decisionale dovrebbe essere ripetuta.

È quindi necessario disporre di una maggioranza in ciascuno dei due centri direzionale: il Consiglio Europeo e l’europarlamento.

Ma questi due consessi seguono logiche decisionali differenti. Mentre nell’europarlamento la maggioranza è quella scaturita dalle urne elettorali, nel Consiglio Europeo deve coagulare, di volta in volta, il voto di almeno ventuno stati membri. Questo a parziale tutela degli stati meno popolosi.

* * * * * * *

Le recenti elezioni europee hanno rotto i pristini equilibri. Ppe ed S&D hanno perso la maggioranza, che potrebbero formare solo alleandosi con il gruppo liberal: ma nei fatti sono i veri sconfitti, avendo perso ciascuno un po’ più di quaranta seggi. Ma la sconfitta elettorale è solo l’epifenomeno di quella della sconfitta dell’ideologia liberal socialista.

Putin. L’ideologia liberal è ‘obsoleta’.

Però l’europarlamento è in grande maggioranza di ideologia liberal socialista, ed intenderebbe proseguire in questo alveo.

Fëdor Dostoevskij ha magistralmente sintetizzato nel Monologo del Grande Inquisitore, ne I Fratelli Karamazov, il cuore centrale dell’ideologia liberal socialista.

* * *

Ma gli equilibri sono stati rotti anche nel Consiglio Europeo.

La passata gestione Juncker – Tusk ha fatto il possibile e l’impossibile per imporre a tutti gli stati membri la propria ideologia. Nei confronti degli stati i punti portanti erano:

– the rule of law, ovvero una magistratura che applicasse l’ideologia liberal socialista;

– il passaggio da unione di stati sovrani ad uno stato europeo centralizzato;

– l’imposizione dell’etica e morale insita nell’ideologia liberal socialista;

– identificazione della democrazia nell’accettazione delle ngo, ong, sul proprio territorio.

Questa linea comportamentale ha generato un’immediata reazione da parte dei paesi dell’ex est europeo, massimamente da quelli del Gruppo Visegrad, che si sono fatti paladini identitari sovranisti. Si pensi solo che il Partito Popolare Europeo, sotto impulso di Herr Weber, sia arrivato a sospendere per motivazioni ideologiche il Fidesz di Mr Orban, proprio pochi giorni prima delle votazioni. Un modo molto singolare di cercare di raccogliere consensi. Con le elezioni politiche italiane, anche la nostra nazione si è spostata su queste posizioni. In breve, al momento attuale sono undici gli stati membri dell’Unione Europea che formano il blocco degli identitari sovranisti: sufficit per bloccare tutte le decisioni che debbano essere prese alla unanimità ovvero a maggioranza qualificata.

* * *

Arrivati alla conta, gli identitari sovranisti hanno dapprima affondato la candidatura di Herr Weber, patrocinato dalla Germania di Frau Merkel, quindi hanno distrutto la candidatura di Mr Timmermans, patrocinata dalla Francia di Mr Maron, ed infine hanno fatto svanire l’ultima proposta di Frau Merkel, di un’alternanza alla Presidenza dei due candidati già bocciati. L’epoca in cui Germania e Francia si vedevano a quattro occhi e decidevano per tutta la Unione era defunta.

La candidatura di Frau Ursula von der Leyen è stata accettata e pienamente appoggiata dagli identitari sovranisti solo quando questa ha espressamente e chiaramente assunto l’impegno a non parlare mai più di rule of law, stato europeo, ed etica e morale liberal, per non parlare poi delle ngo.

Mr Junker, Mr Tusk, la Germania di Frau Merkel e la Francia di Mr Macron hanno subito una sconfitta annientante.

* * *

Se è vero che le candidature di Frau Ursula von der Leyen e di Mrs Christine Lagarde siano fatiscenti, sarebbe altrettanto vero constatare come ratificandole l’europarlamento dovrebbe ammettere la propria sconfitta ideologica e politica. Per il Ppe e S&D sarebbe una resa senza condizioni.

Quindi nulla è ancora definitivo ed i giochi sono ancora aperti.

Però, sempre che sia approvata la nomina, Frau Ursula von der Leyen farà bene a ricordarsi sempre delle promesse fatte. I Consiglio Europeo vota anche i budget, per esempio.


EU Observer. 2019-07-03. German minister presidency plan upsets MEPs

Germany’s defence minister Ursula von der Leyen emerged on Tuesday (2 July) as a possible compromise among EU leaders for the European Commission presidency – after three days of intensive negotiations in Brussels.

The 60-year old conservative politician was put forward by France, with Germany and the eastern European block of ‘Visegrad Four’ countries in support, and she also has the backing of Italy. If it happens, it would make her the first female president of the EU commission.

Under this scenario, the presidency of the EU Council would go to the liberals, with Belgian prime minister Charles Michel getting the post.

Spanish foreign minister Josep Borrell would be named EU foreign policy chief, who hails from the Socialist party.

The International Monetary Fund’s French managing director Christine Lagarde would be the new head of the European Central Bank, according to officials familiar with the discussions.

European Socialist party leader, Bulgarian MEP Sergei Stanishev could become the president of the European Parliament, according to the EU leaders’ plan, with Germany’s centre-right lead candidate Manfred Weber possibly taking the second half of the five-year term.

This new list of frontrunners emerged after the Visegrad countries, Italy and several leaders aligned with the centre-right. European People’s Party (EPP) objected to a package cooked up at the weekend at the G20 summit in Japan that would have seen the Socialist lead candidate, Dutch commissioner Frans Timmermans take the commission presidency.

The discussions among EU leaders were delayed on Tuesday by several hours of consultations among different leaders chaired by EU Council president Donald Tusk.

The 28 leaders gathered together late afternoon to discuss the new package of names.

Unhappy MEPs

The candidate for the presidency of the EU commission needs a majority in the European Parliament, and so the European leaders have for the first time decided to seek consultations with the parliament on the package they plan to agree.

If the three major political groups – EPP, the Socialists & Democrats, and the liberals of Renew Europe – agree with the proposal from the European Council, there will be an overall deal. If not, national leaders will need to go back to the drawing board.

Meanwhile, early reactions from MEPs who were gathered in Strasbourg for the first session of the new parliament criticised the emerging deal.

German Social democrat MEP Bernd Lange‏ tweeted that the current names discussed by leaders are “unacceptable” for the socialists in the EP.

Vice-chair for the Socialist group, Tania Fajon also said in a tweet: “Very clear no, majority is not prepared to support the current deal on EU top jobs”.

“Hearing strong messages to the European council that the current package proposal is not acceptable for many heads of delegations,” she added, referring to the Socialist member parties.

The Greens’ lead candidate Bas Eickhout also dismissed the emerging new deal in a tweet saying “Congratulations Council. Rule of law slaughtered for some positions for Merkel, Macron and Sanchez”.

The Dutch politician referred to German, French and Spanish leaders giving up on Timmermans because of objections from the Visegrad Four, whose members, Poland and Hungary have been heavily criticised by the Dutch commissioner over the rule of law.

The different parliamentary groups were now expected to meet in the early evening to discuss whether they can support the German defence minister for the commission presidency.

In a resolution last February, the European parliament had firmly reiterated that the commission presidency should go to one of the ‘Spitzenkandidaten’, or lead candidates for the European parties – which Von den Leyen is not.

The negotiations between the prime ministers and heads of state are already more complicated than ever before, as they try to juggle political groupings, gender balance, and east-west internal EU positions.

By adding the parliament to the decision-making process the aim was to boost the democratic legitimacy of the process, but an increase in the party political aspect has made any agreement more difficult.

Parliament program

MEPs’ vote on the European Parliament president was postponed last week to Wednesday morning (3 July), as the EU heads of state in Brussels were still negotiating in Brussels on how to distribute the top posts in the future European power architecture.

But even without a deal in Brussels over the new EU leadership, the parliament is expected to go ahead with the vote.

Two groups, the Socialists and Renew, had not officially announced a candidate for the post. They have time to do that until 22h00 tonight.

“There is no Socialist candidate to be parliament president as the party is relying on Timmermans” to get a top post,” said out-going German Social democrat MEP, Jo Leinen.

Leaders of the four main political groups in parliament, EPP, Socialists, liberals of Renew Europe and the Greens were also meeting in Strasbourg in the afternoon as part of long series of meetings set to formulate a legislative program for the next five years.

That joint program must be finalised before the next parliament session in mid-July – and is aimed at binding the commission president politically.

The Greens does not have a prime minister at the EU summit in Brussels distributing top posts, but their support is important to secure a broad majority in parliament in the next five years.

One Green insider told EUobserver that the party was not happy what it was currently offered in return for supporting the wider deal.

“The legislative program would not be the first of its kind, as Juncker also met with the different political groups in parliament and listened to them, with the Juncker plan being one result of that process,” Leinen said.

“But this time there is a shift in the character of the deal, it is meant to become formally a legislative program,” he added.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Giustizia, Senza categoria, Unione Europea

Romania. Ire della EU per aver accorciato i termini di prescrizione.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-04-21.

Romania

La Romania ha al momento la Presidenza dell’Unione Europea: difficile ignorare i suoi problemi di politica interna.

Questo stato ha con l’Unione Europea, meglio con la attuale eurodirigenza uscente, un annoso contenzioso.

La Romania rivendica infatti la propria sovranità nazionale nel legiferare su problematiche interne, mentre l’attuale dirigenza europea ritiene di essere in diritto di imporle il proprio volere.

Chiariamo immediatamente un problema lessicologico che riflette le differenti visioni.

Per la Commissione Europea uscente, il termine “rule of law”, traducibile con la dizione ‘stato di diritto’ si concretizza nella adozione delle visioni giuridiche dell’idealismo liberal socialista. Come conseguenza, la Commissione Europea uscente tutela allo spasimo i giudici che aderiscano a tale ideologia, e considera reato l’opporsi ad essi ed al loro operato. Senza giudici della propria sponda questa eurodirigenza non potrebbe farla da padrona in casa rumena.

*

Come solitamente avviene, dietro le altisonanti parole di etica, morale e giustizia si celano sordidi interessi personali.

Romania. I gerarchi EU la odiano per motivi di sordida bottega.

«Un giudizio sommario sui governi che si sono succeduti in Romania potrebbe essere lo constatare che il pil era 42.815 mld Usd nel 1998 passati ai 210 mld Usd nel 2017: è quintuplicato in venti anni. Il pil procapite è passato nello stesso periodo da 1,897 Usd a 10,765 Usd. ….

Sulle coste rumene, e nelle acque di competenza economica, si trovano grandi giacimenti di gas naturale, che la Romania decise di sfruttare appieno. ….

As a new offshore oil and gas exploration law comes into force in Romania, the EU nation’s promise of becoming a key gas producer in Europe could be threatened. Not that Bucharest seems bothered.

Romania’s untapped oil and gas potential of up to 200 billion cubic meters, or bcm, in the Black Sea has attracted the interest of the world’s oil and gas majors, including US giant ExxonMobil and Austria’s OMV Petrom»

Al momento attuale la Romania consuma 11 – 12 bcm, billion cubic meter, di gas naturale, producendone10.5 bcm: è praticamente autosufficiente.

Detto con parole che non si dovremmo dire, non è più ricattabile energeticamente.»

*

L’unica arma rimasta nelle mani dell’attuale eurodirigenza uscente per garantirsi una fetta cospicua dei proventi petroliferi rumeni era il controllo della magistratura rumena, i cui giudici liberal si davano un gran da fare per eliminare gli oppositori.

I rumeni reagirono sia con una riforma della giustizia sia silurando la trentenne Laura Kövesi, procuratore capo in Romania ma fatta nominare da Juncker. La Commissione Europea allora cercò di imporre la Kövesi come procuratrice dell’Unione Europea, nonostante che il Consiglio Europeo avesse bocciato la sua candidatura. A questo punto i rumeni la fecero arrestare ed il progetto di Mr Juncker abortì.

Affaire Kövesi. Financial Times così furibondo da pubblicare senza blocchi.

* * *

Di questi giorni l’ultima notizia in merito.

I senatori rumeni hanno approvato una legge che abbrevia i termini di prescrizione dei reati. Essere sospettati non significa essere colpevoli, ma comparire davanti ad un giudice liberal significa sicuramente essere condannati per motivi ideologici.

Stiamo vivendo gli ultimi guizzi di una Commissione Europea uscente di mandato.

Il 26 maggio si andrà alle urne.

Nessuno si aspetti mutazioni epocali, ma se non altro questa Commissione Europea dovrebbe scomparire.

*


EU Observer. 2019-04-19. Romania defies EU on rule of law

Romanian senators have backed a law that will let several high level corruption suspects off the hook by shortening the statute of limitations of crimes, in defiance of EU concern on “systemic” abuse of rule of law in the member state, which currently holds the EU presidency. Romanian prime minister Viorica Dancila also pledged to “finalise” other controversial changes, despite European Commission warnings Bucharest could face an EU sanctions procedure.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Juncker, Tusk, Polonia ed Ungheria. La voglia di dittatura.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-05-15.

2018-05-15__Unione_Europea__001

Ci si rende perfettamente conto che il termine “dittatura” a molti potrebbe suonare troppo forte, spropositato, partigiano. Ma a nostro sommesso parere è invece adeguato.

Ci si ricordi quanta confusione porta un uso improprio e mutevole dei termini.

«the rule of law»

Per Mr Juncker, Mr Tusk, Frau Merkel e Mr Macron indica uno ‘stato di diritto’ fondato sui principi metagiuridici della ideologia liberal. Ma i Trattati sottoscritti non indicano minimamente come la ideologia liberal debba essere quella che impronta l’Unione Europea. Questa è una personalissima interpretazione dei sunnominati signori. Concetto contenuto nel progetto di Costituzione europea che fu bocciato sia dal referendum in Francia sia da quello tenuto nei Paesi Bassi.

Inoltre, cosa che a quanto pare nessuno vuole ricordare e, diciamolo francamente, in perfetta malafede, molti dei paesi europei sono vincolati anche dai Trattati e dagli accordi vergati in sede Nato, alcuni dei quali hanno ampie ripercussioni nella Unione Europea. Il fatto che alcuni odino di odio viscerale la Nato, e lo stato che maggiormente la rappresenta, non costituisce motivo buono per disattendere i patti.

Questa dirigenza dell’Unione Europea si sta avviando alla fine del mandato. Tra meno di un anno si terranno nuove elezioni, ed il quadro potrebbe essere drasticamente variato. Già ora, in seno al Consiglio Europeo non dispongono più della maggioranza dei voti, e con le elezioni italiane del 4 marzo potrebbero anche trovarsi un capo del governo italiano completamente contrario alle sue tesi.

*

«Poland’s EU affairs minister accused the European Commission of a “massive power grab” over the executive’s plans to link some funds to respect for the rule of law – highlighting the concerns of those countries that feel targeted by the proposal.»

*

«EU affairs ministers on Monday (14 May) had their first chance to discuss the commission’s proposal for the next seven-year EU budget, which for the first time involves the idea of tying the disbursement of EU funds to member states’ record on upholding the rule of law.»

*

«The debate revealed deep divisions, just as the EU gears up for an uncertain period with the US becoming an unpredictable partner, and China developing into a more assertive global player.»

*

«Poland, which is under scrutiny by the commission for breaking EU rules on the independence of the judiciary, and Hungary which has had its own run-in with the EU executive, both feel particularly targeted by the commission’s proposal.»

*

«Poland’s minister Konrad Szymanski pushed back hard on the proposal saying it is an attempt to override legally binding rulings from the European Court of Justice (ECJ). …. “The proposal seems like a massive power grab with too high a discretion in the commission’s hand,” Szymanski told the other ministers.»

*

«Hungary’s ambassador for the EU, Oliver Varhelyi, filling in for the minister, backed up Poland’s position. …. “One would have to be very careful when introducing such an instrument, one has to follow the law verbatim here,”»

*

«The so-called ‘conditionality’ instrument would be triggered if the commission detects “generalised deficiencies” in the functioning of a member states’ judiciary that impacts on the the proper use of EU funds.»

* * * * * * * *

Non solo.

Lo stesso Consiglio Europeo riporta a chiare lettere che

«Il Consiglio deve votare all’unanimità su una serie di questioni considerate sensibili dagli Stati membri. Ad esempio: ….

– finanze UE (risorse proprie, quadro finanziario pluriennale);

– alcune disposizioni in materia di giustizia e affari interni (Procura europea, diritto di famiglia, cooperazione di polizia a livello operativo, ecc.);»

*

Mr Juncker può piangere petrolio e Mr Tusk può piangere ammoniaca, ma la direttiva di finanziamento pluriennale deve essere approvata dal Consiglio Europeo ed alla unanimità. Ogni altro modo di farla “approvare” altro non sarebbe che gesto dittatoriale mussoliniano.

È solo colpa loro se hanno perso la maggioranza, e questi maldestri tentativi mussoliniani non vanno certo a loro merito.


EU Observer. 2018-05-14. Poland, Hungary push back at EU budget ‘conditionality’

Poland’s EU affairs minister accused the European Commission of a “massive power grab” over the executive’s plans to link some funds to respect for the rule of law – highlighting the concerns of those countries that feel targeted by the proposal.

EU affairs ministers on Monday (14 May) had their first chance to discuss the commission’s proposal for the next seven-year EU budget, which for the first time involves the idea of tying the disbursement of EU funds to member states’ record on upholding the rule of law.

The debate revealed deep divisions, just as the EU gears up for an uncertain period with the US becoming an unpredictable partner, and China developing into a more assertive global player.

Poland, which is under scrutiny by the commission for breaking EU rules on the independence of the judiciary, and Hungary which has had its own run-in with the EU executive, both feel particularly targeted by the commission’s proposal.

Poland’s minister Konrad Szymanski pushed back hard on the proposal saying it is an attempt to override legally binding rulings from the European Court of Justice (ECJ).

“The proposal seems like a massive power grab with too high a discretion in the commission’s hand,” Szymanski told the other ministers.

“We are ready to support all the instruments to better control EU money, but we need something more intelligent and treaty-based,” he added.

Hungary’s ambassador for the EU, Oliver Varhelyi, filling in for the minister, backed up Poland’s position.

“One would have to be very careful when introducing such an instrument, one has to follow the law verbatim here,” he said, adding that there are serious concerns with the proposal’s legal base and the criteria’s for the measure are vague.

The so-called ‘conditionality’ instrument would be triggered if the commission detects “generalised deficiencies” in the functioning of a member states’ judiciary that impacts on the the proper use of EU funds.

“Generalised deficiencies” could mean national authorities not following up damning reports by the EU’s anti-fraud agency, Olaf, or that judges are systematically biased, or that judgement are not enforced in practice, EU officials say.

The commission would have the power to suspend EU funds if the member state does not address these problems, and the council – the body of member states – could only stop it with a qualified majority.

Several member states, including Belgium, Germany, France, Sweden, however expressed support for the new instrument.

“It is very reasonable to ask to respect the rule of law as a prerequisite for EU funds,” Sweden’s minister for EU affairs and trade Ann Linde said.

Old vs New

Several member states also pushed back on the commission’s proposal to include new indicators when calculating the allocation of cohesion funds, other than the GDP-per-capita figure that has been the centre of the equation so far.

The commission plans to introduce migration, unemployment, climate and other figures to calculate who much countries and regions get. However, its detailed plans are only going to be unveiled at the end of May, making specific calculations for now very difficult.

Central and eastern European member states fear the new indicators will drive cohesion funds away from them, to southern European countries.

Some central and eastern states heavily criticised the commission’s plans to cut the fund that they said could result in a 30-40 percent loss for some of the poorest regions. Poland fears the national cuts could be also as high as 30 percent.

“Should it stay as it proposed, politically we will not be able to explain or justify this approach that makes the least developed regions the losers [of the EU budget],” Ivan Korcok, Slovakia’s state secretary for EU affairs said, arguing the cohesion cuts were too high.

Net payers, particularly the Netherlands, Austria, Sweden, Denmark and Finland that do not want to see an increase in the overall figure of the EU budget.

They argue that European investment should be turned away from ‘traditional’ areas such as cohesion and agriculture, and invested instead in innovation and climate, and used to address new challenges, such as defence and migration.

“More ambition and less tradition,” Dutch foreign minister Stef Blok said.

Some ministers argued, however, that drastically cutting cohesion funds, a tool to help the economic converges of poor regions, could harm the overall competitiveness of the EU, and weaken the internal market.

Another major faultline is emerging among member states over the rebates, a complicated correction mechanism that was originally designed to keep the UK’s budget contribution in some sort of equilibrium.

In a complex mechanism Germany, the Netherlands, Austria and Sweden also get rebates, which the commission plans to phase out in five years as Brexit scraps the rationale for the original rebate.

This is unacceptable to the Netherlands, as it fears its budget contribution will be disproportionate to its size. Yet France, for instance, is arguing that rebates should be cut fully, as with Brexit there is no reason any longer for their existence.