Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Polonia, Repubblica Ceka, Ungheria ed Estonia bloccano la EU sul carbone.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-06-24.

2019-06-22__Clima__001

«Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary, and Estonia prevented the EU from adopting a clear long-term climate neutrality goal at the summit in Brussels on Thursday evening (20 June).»

«The central and eastern European leaders could not get behind a draft text which said the EU should take measures “to ensure a transition to a climate-neutral EU by 2050” – a date too specific for them»

«Poland was leading the opposition, with support from the Czech Republic and Hungary»

«A clear commitment for the 2050 date was also missing from Estonia, an EU source said on condition of anonymity.

Another EU source said “three and a half states” were against – in an illustration of the non-committal stance of Estonia»

«But in the end, the leaders decided to scrap the 2050 commitment»

«The final text now says the EU aspires to climate neutrality “in line with the Paris agreement”, and the mention of the year 2050 was moved to a footnote»

«Ironically, in the text published on the European Council website on Thursday evening, the footnote initially was not included»

* * * * * * *

Per meglio comprendere il significato di questa posizione si dovrebbe leggere con cura il testo rilasciato dal Consglio Europeo.

«European Council conclusions on the MFF, climate change, disinformation and hybrid threats, external relations, enlargement and the European Semester, 20 June 2019

  1. Multiannual financial framework

  2. The European Council welcomed the work done under the Romanian Presidency and took note of the various elements of the MFF package. It called on Finland’s Presidency to pursue the work and to develop the Negotiating Box. On that basis the European Council will hold an exchange of views in October 2019, aiming for an agreement before the end of the year.

III. Climate change

  1. The European Council emphasises the importance of the United Nations Secretary General’s Climate Action Summit in September for stepping up global climate action so as to achieve the objective of the Paris Agreement, including by pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. It welcomes the active involvement of Member States and the Commission in the preparations.

  2. Following the sectoral discussions held over recent months, the European Council invites the Council and the Commission to advance work on the conditions, the incentives and the enabling framework to be put in place so as to ensure a transition to a climate-neutral EU in line with the Paris Agreement [1] that will preserve European competitiveness, be just and socially balanced, take account of Member States’ national circumstances and respect their right to decide on their own energy mix, while building on the measures already agreed to achieve the 2030 reduction target. The European Council will finalise its guidance before the end of the year with a view to the adoption and submission of the EU’s long-term strategy to the UNFCCC in early 2020. In this context, the European Council invites the European Investment Bank to step up its activities in support of climate action.

  3. The EU and its Member States remain committed to scaling up the mobilisation of international climate finance from a wide variety of private and public sources and to working towards a timely, well-managed and successful replenishment process for the Green Climate Fund.»

Dapprima esprime un enunciato di principio:

«take account of Member States’ national circumstances and respect their right to decide on their own energy mix»

Poi si arriva al nocciolo vero.

«Multiannual financial framework …. Green Climate Fund»

L’obiettivo è arrivare a varare un piano finanziario pluriennale che sostenga il Green Climate Fund, le risorse del quale saranno impiegate per sostenere le economie tedesca, francese ed olandese.

Interessano i soldi: il ‘clima’ è solo la foglia di fico che santificherebbe il saccheggio.

Ma il piano finanziario pluriennale deve essere approvato dal Consiglio Europeo alla unanimità, e l’epoca in cui l’asse francogermanico era onnipotente è tramontata.


EU Observer. 2019-06-22. Four states block EU 2050 carbon neutral target

Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary, and Estonia prevented the EU from adopting a clear long-term climate neutrality goal at the summit in Brussels on Thursday evening (20 June).

The central and eastern European leaders could not get behind a draft text which said the EU should take measures “to ensure a transition to a climate-neutral EU by 2050” – a date too specific for them.

Poland was leading the opposition, with support from the Czech Republic and Hungary.

A clear commitment for the 2050 date was also missing from Estonia, an EU source said on condition of anonymity.

Another EU source said “three and a half states” were against – in an illustration of the non-committal stance of Estonia.

“There was lots of back and forth and ‘how can we persuade you’,” added the source.

But in the end, the leaders decided to scrap the 2050 commitment.

The final text now says the EU aspires to climate neutrality “in line with the Paris agreement”, and the mention of the year 2050 was moved to a footnote.

“For a large majority of member states, climate neutrality must be achieved by 2050,” that footnote said.

Ironically, in the text published on the European Council website on Thursday evening, the footnote initially was not included.

Climate neutrality refers to an economy in which the emission of greenhouse gases caused by human activity is mostly prevented, and any remaining emissions are compensated through for example planting additional trees or capturing emissions and storing them.

The reference of climate neutrality “in line with the Paris agreement” is open to interpretation.

The global climate agreement, clinched in 2015 in the French capital, said that the entire world should reach climate neutrality “in the second half of this century”.

However, the Paris deal also said that efforts must be made to limit global warming to an average temperature rise of 1.5C, compared to pre-industrial levels.

The failure to reach a consensus on 2050 will be a disappointment to many who saw positive signs in recent weeks.

That 2050 target seemed to gain momentum recently after the EU’s largest state, Germany, decided to support it.

Also earlier this month, the United Kingdom, although leaving the EU, committed to a domestic zero-emissions target by 2050, while Italy also came on board.

But at the EU summit in Brussels it proved to be impossible to convince the last quartet of sceptics.

Consensus is needed for leaders to adopt official conclusions.

One diplomatic source said the reluctance of some coal-dependent member states was “expected”.

“It’s easier for Scandinavian countries to commit to climate neutrality,” he said.

“These are known differences [between the member states]”, he added.

Poland’s permanent representation in Brussels said in a tweet that prime minister Mateusz Morawiecki “defends [Poland]’s interests in discussion about climate policy”.

“Fair distribution of climate protection costs means taking into account the specificities of [member states]. Climate goals are important in the same way as their implementation, taking into account citizens & economy,” it said.

‘Blew it’

But non-governmental organisations were frustrated with the outcome.

Greenpeace said that Europe’s governments “had a chance to lead from the front and put Europe on a rapid path to full decarbonisation”.

“They blew it,” the environmental lobby group added.

Friends of the Earth meanwhile called the vetoes “criminal behaviour”.

“The reference to being in line with the Paris agreement in such a flimsy text makes a mockery of that agreement, and should not be allowed to stand,” said WWF.

The diplomatic source stressed, however, that the EU was “still ambitious” and that he never expected the final target year to be agreed at this summit.

“The climate debate is not finished. It will come back, certainly, in December,” he said.

Meanwhile at the summit, the leaders did agree in the text to submit a long-term climate strategy to the UN climate body in “early 2020”, and adopted a Strategic Agenda which identified climate action as one of the EU’s priorities.

The Strategic Agenda, covering the 2019-2024 period, said the EU’s policies should be “consistent with the Paris agreement” – but also did not contain a specific year for carbon neutrality.

“As the effects of climate change become more visible and pervasive, we urgently need to step up our action to manage this existential threat. The EU can and must lead the way, by engaging in an in-depth transformation of its own economy and society to achieve climate neutrality,” it said.

Another new impetus for the climate debate will be on 1 July when Finland takes over the helm for six months as EU president.

Earlier this month Finland said it wanted to be climate neutral by 2035.

In the early hours of Friday, European Council president Donald Tusk told press “reaching unanimity was not possible today”.

“However, we have good reason to believe that this may change, as no country ruled out the possibility of a positive decision in the coming months,” said Tusk.

Annunci
Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Repubblica Ceka. Ultimi sondaggi.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-05-25.

Animali. Bocca aperta. Civetta. 001

Lunedì nel primo pomeriggio saranno disponibili i risultati elettorali, e sarà interessante controntarli con le previsioni. Se non altro per selezionare le società che più si sono avvicinate ai numeri reali.

*

«In the Czech Republic a total of 21 MEPs were to be elected, with the populist ANO party poised for victory ahead of the leftwing Social Democrats.» [Deutsche Welle]

*


The New York Times. 2019-05-25. The Latest: Polls Open in Czech Republic, Centrists Seek Win

Polls have opened for the European Parliament elections in the Czech Republic, with a centrist party led by populist Prime Minister Andrej Babis expected to win despite the fraud charges he faces involving European Union funds.

The Czechs on Friday opened their two-day ballot for their country’s 21 seats in the 751-seat European Parliament. Voters in the Netherlands and Britain on Thursday kicked off four days of voting across the 28-nation bloc.

Babis’ ANO (YES) movement is predicted to win up to 25% of the vote, followed by the moderate euroskeptic Civic Democratic Party and the pro-European Pirate party.

Babis wants his country to remain in the bloc but is calling for EU reforms.

The country’s most ardent anti-EU group, the Freedom and Direct Democracy party, is predicted to win around 10% of the vote and capture its first seats in the EU legislature.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo

Europa. Risultati Elettorali 2017.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-04-24.

Europa 002

Riportiamo da Edn Hub i risultati elettorali 2017

Dopo le ferite riportate nel 2016 con l’esito del referendum sulla Brexit, il 2017 è stato l’anno della verità per l’Unione europea, con appuntamenti elettorali in Olanda, Bulgaria, Francia, Regno Unito, Germania, Repubblica Ceca, Austria e Malta. L’obiettivo, raggiunto parzialmente, era quello invertire l’ondata populista che, in tutti i Paesi, ha saputo imporre la sua agenda in campagna elettorale e si è trasformato nella terza forza europea.

Ecco tutti i risultati elettorali del 2017 e i tipi di governo che si sono formati o si formeranno, con una caratteristica sempre più diffusa: essere di coalizione.

– OLANDA – Il voto del 15 marzo 2017 nei Paesi Bassi ha scacciato il pericolo di una ‘Nexit’ (‘Netherland exit’), molto temuta a Bruxelles dopo quanto accaduto nel Regno Unito. A spuntarla è infatti stato il primo ministro uscente e leader dei conservatori, Mark Rutte, che con il 21,3% dei consensi si è imposto sul populista, euroscettico e antislamico Geert Wilders, terzo con il 13,1%. Oltre 13 milioni di olandesi si sono recati alle urne per decidere il nome del nuovo primo ministro e la composizione del Parlamento, segnando un dato record sull’affluenza (82%), la più alta degli ultimi trent’anni nel Paese. Dopo 208 giorni di colloqui, è stato raggiunto un accordo per la formazione del governo: a guidare il paese è una coalizione di centrodestra, con il Vvd, partito del premier Mark Rutte, insieme ai cristiano-democratici del Cda, ai liberali progressisti del D66 e ai conservatori della Christen Union. E’ stato eguagliato il record del 1977: anche allora furono necessari 208 giorni per formare un governo, operazione tradizionalmente lenta nel Paese.

– BULGARIA – Il partito conservatore filo-europeista Gerb, guidato  dal premier Boyko Borissov, ha vinto le elezioni politiche di domenica 26 marzo con il 33,55% dei voti. Al secondo posto si è collocato il Partito socialista di Kornelia Ninova, con poco più del 27,02% dei voti, mentre ha raggiunto il terzo posto la coalizione nazionalista Patrioti uniti, con il 9,12% dei voti.  L’affluenza alle urne è stata intorno al 50%. Si è trattato del primo appuntamento elettorale a livello nazionale in un Paese Ue dopo la firma, sabato 25 marzo 2017, della Dichiarazione di Roma in occasione delle celebrazioni nella capitale italiana per il 60° anniversario della sigla dei Trattati di Roma.

– FRANCIA – L’europeista Emmanuel Macron domenica 7 maggio ha vinto il ballottaggio delle elezioni presidenziali francesi con il 66,1% delle preferenze, contro il 33,9% della sfidante euroscettica e populista Marine Le Pen. Evitata, quindi, una ‘Frexit’, paventata dalla rivale con un referendum su Ue ed euro in caso di vittoria. Al primo turno del 23 aprile, dove era stata registrata un’affluenza attorno all’80%, il leader di ‘En Marche!’ era arrivato in testa con il 24,01% contro il 21,30% della leader del Front National. Al secondo turno, invece, l’astensione è stata record con il 25,44%, la più elevata dal 1969, mentre 3,01 milioni di francesi hanno votato scheda bianca e 1,06 milioni sono stati i voti nulli. Alle successive elezioni legislative del 18 giugno il partito En Marche! del presidente francese Macron ha sbancato con il 43,06% dei consensi, consegnandogli la maggioranza assoluta. Si è invece spenta l’onda populista e anti-Ue del Front National: dopo la sconfitta nella corsa all’Eliseo, il partito di Marine Le Pen è sceso all’8,75%.

– MALTA – Il 3 giugno il premier maltese Joseph Muscat, travolto da uno scandalo insieme alla moglie legato alle società offshore smascherate dai Panama Papers, e il suo partito laburista pro-Ue sono stati confermati alla guida del Paese con il 55% dei voti, sconfiggendo il leader del Partito Nazionalista Simon Busuttil.

– REGNO UNITO – L’8 giugno 2017 i cittadini britannici sono andati alle urne per le elezioni politiche anticipate (la legislatura si sarebbe conclusa nel 2020). La premier Theresa May aveva infatti deciso di promuovere lo scioglimento anticipato della Camera dei Comuni attraverso una mozione approvata dal Parlamento il 19 aprile 2017 con una maggioranza superiore ai due terzi. L’obiettivo della May era di avere una maggioranza parlamentare più forte per affrontare il processo della Brexit in una situazione più favorevole e imporre una ‘hard Brexit’. Obiettivo clamorosamente mancato: i Tory infatti si sono confermati primo partito del Regno Unito con il 42,4% dei consensi, ma non hanno raggiunto la maggioranza assoluta. In Parlamento hanno ottenuto 318 seggi, perdendone 12 rispetto al 2015. Exploit invece dei laburisti di Jeremy Corbyn, subito dietro al 40% (+9% rispetto al 2015), con 262 deputati e un balzo di 30 seggi in più. Venti giorni dopo le elezioni, May ha quindi firmato un accordo con il partito degli unionisti nordirlandesi del Dup, spalla del governo di minoranza Tory.

– GERMANIA – Le elezioni federali del 2017 per eleggere i membri del nuovo Bundestag, il parlamento tedesco, si sono tenute il 24 settembre. La cancelliera uscente Angela Merkel ne è uscita vincitrice ma indebolita: il suo partito, la Cdu-Csu ha ottenuto il 33% dei consensi (-8,5%). I socialisti della Spd, guidati dall’ex presidente del Parlamento europeo, Martin Schulz, si sono fermati al 20,5% (-5,2%), mentre si è verificata l’ascesa a sorpresa i populisti di Alternative für Deutschland (AfD), arrivati terzi al 12,6% (+7,9%). Il partito euroscettico, trascinato dai candidati di punta Alice Weidel e Alexander Gualand, con 95 i seggi conquistati è il primo partito di estrema destra ad entrare nel Parlamento federale tedesco dal secondo dopoguerra. Dopo il tentativo fallito di formare una coalizione guidata dall’Unione di Angela Merkel con i Liberali e i Verdi, la cosiddetta coalizione Giamaica – così denominata per i colori dei tre partiti nero-giallo-verde, come la bandiera della nazione caraibica -, si va ora verso una riedizione della Große Koalition tra Cdu-Csu e Spd. I colloqui però presentano ancora ostacoli. Due le alternative: un governo di minoranza della Cancelliera tedesca, utile nel breve periodo, oppure il ritorno alle urne.

– AUSTRIA – Il 15 ottobre si è votato per le elezioni parlamentari anticipate di un anno prima rispetto al termine naturale della legislatura. Il ministro degli Esteri uscente, Sebastian Kurz, leader del Partito popolare austriaco (ÖVP), è diventato premier con il 31,4% dei voti. L’estrema destra del Partito della libertà austriaco (FPÖ) di Heinz-Christian Strache, è arrivata seconda con il 27,4%, terzi i socialdemocratici di SPÖ guidati dal cancelliere uscente Christian Kern, al 26,7%. Il partito di Kurz, tuttavia, non ha raggiunto una maggioranza tale da poter governare da solo: dopo quasi due mesi di trattative, il 18 dicembre è arrivato il giuramento del nuovo governo di destra austriaco, guidato dalla coalizione tra l’ÖVP di Kurz e gli oltranzisti dell’FPÖ di Strache.

– REPUBBLICA CECA – Le elezioni parlamentari si sono tenute il 20 e 21 ottobre 2017.  Ha vinto il movimento Ano 2011, “Azione del cittadino scontento”, di Andrej Babis con il 29,64% e 78 seggi su 200 in Parlamento. Al secondo posto il centrodestra dei Civici democratici (Ods) con l’11,32% e 25 parlamentari. Al terzo posto i Pirati con il 10,79% e 22 seggi. Non avendo i numeri per formare una maggioranza di governo, Babis formerà con tutta probabilità un governo di minoranza che conti su ministri del suo partito e tecnici. Il mandato gli è stato affidato il 31 ottobre dal presidente ceco Milos Zeman, che ha detto di preferire l’opzione di un governo di minoranza a quello di un esecutivo di maggioranza, perché è il modo più semplice per promuovere le decisioni. Secondo Babis, il governo di minoranza è l’unica soluzione, dal momento che gli altri partiti entrati in Parlamento non vogliono entrare in coalizione con lui.

– CATALOGNA – A margine delle elezioni ufficiali per i governi di diversi Stati dell’Ue, il 21 dicembre 2017 si sono tenute anche le elezioni in Catalogna, indette dopo l’esito schiachiante del referendum per l’indipendenza dalla Spagna del 2 novembre 2017 e le inevitabili conseguenze (la dichiarazione di indipendenza della Catalogna e l’attuazione dell’articolo 155 da parte del governo di Madrid). I catalani hanno scelto nuovamente il campo indipendentista, infliggendo un sonoro schiaffo politico al premier spagnolo Mariano Rajoy. Ora la situazione è in stallo, con la maggior parte dei vincitori indipendisti o in carcere o rifugiati fuori dal Paese e nessuna apertura da parte del governo centrale. L’ex President catalano e leader indipendista Carles Puigdemont, in esilio a Bruxelles, è stretto tra due fuochi: se tornerà a Barcellona sarà arrestato, ma restando nella capitale belga non potrà essere nominato nuovamente President. La prima sessione del nuovo parlamento catalano, secondo quanto annunciato da Rajoy, dovrebbe tenersi il 17 gennaio 2018.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Praga. Ha quasi più spie che abitanti.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-01-22.

praga pone san carlo ''1

La Repubblica Ceka è retta da due personaggi che i liberal socialisti odiano a morte.

*

Mr Miloš Zeman, Presidente della Camera dei Deputati della Repubblica Ceca dal 1996 al 1998, e Primo ministro dal 1998 al 2002 come leader del Partito Socialdemocratico Ceco, nel 2009 ha fondato il Partito dei Diritti Civili. Il 26 gennaio 2013 è stato eletto alla presidenza della Repubblica Ceca, primo con il suffragio universale diretto.

Miloš Zeman ha vinto le elezioni presidenziali in Repubblica Ceca [2018-01-27]

«Il presidente uscente della Repubblica Ceca Miloš Zeman ha vinto il ballottaggio delle elezioni presidenziali ceche. Le votazioni si sono chiuse alle 14 e con il 99,80 per cento dei seggi scrutinati, il candidato del Partito dei diritti civili ha vinto dopo aver ottenuto il 51,48 per cento dei voti contro il 48,52 per cento del suo avversario, Jiří Drahoš,»

I motivi dell’astio viscerale che i gerarchi europei provano nei suoi confronti è presto detto:

«Negli ultimi anni Zeman, presidente dal 2013, ha favorito e promosso politiche populiste e anti-immigrazione. Ha anche messo in discussione la partecipazione del suo paese all’Unione Europea e alla NATO, sostenendo la necessità di organizzare un referendum per decidere su entrambe le questioni. Negli ultimi anni la Repubblica Ceca si è infatti avvicinata progressivamente alla Russia e ai governi populisti anti-immigrazione dell’Europa orientale»

*

Mr Andrej Babiš è un politico e imprenditore ceco. Fondatore e leader del partito ANO 2011, è Primo ministro della Repubblica Ceca dal dicembre 2017, dopo i risultati del suo partito alle elezioni legislative dell’ottobre precedente.

I liberal socialisti lo accusano di essere stato un “potente agente” per il servizio segreto cecoslovacco, StB. Durante l’era comunista, sarebbe stato anche accusato di essere un ufficiale di KGB in quegli anni.

Su Mr Babiš sono state scaricate tutte le possibili accuse, specialmente quelle che per i liberal socialisti sarebbero peccati mortali: essere un sovranista, populista, corrotto. Si oppone ad una ulteriore integrazione europea e alla burocrazia dell’Unione europea.

*

In poche parole, i liberal socialisti imputano ai governanti della Repubblica Ceka di essere dei patrioti che hanno più a cuore la propria nazione che le sorti pubbliche e private degli eurocrati.

Ciò detto, Bbc si stupisce che la Repubblica Ceka pulluli di spie, cinesi e russe in particolare.

Non solo.

Si stupisce che né i russi né i cinesi intendano fare gli interessi dei liberal socialisti.


Bbc. 2018-12-23. Prague: The city watching out for Russian and Chinese spies

Czech counter-intelligence has issued stark warnings of intensified espionage activity by Russia and China.

Both countries are pursuing a long-term strategy of undermining the West, according to the Security Information Service (BIS).

While Chinese spies and diplomats pose “an extremely high risk” to Czech citizens, Moscow has continued its hybrid warfare strategy to gain influence over this EU and Nato member, it says.

Prague’s leafy Bubenec district is home to grand villas, diplomatic missions, the Russian embassy, and an excellent Russian-run cafe.

“Thank you,” I said to the waitress, as she laid down a pot of green tea and a slice of lemon tart.

“You’re welcome,” she replied softly, in Russian-accented Czech.

How many spies are here?

I opened the 25-page 2017 BIS Annual Report, and turned to the section on counter-intelligence activity.

“For Czech citizens, the Russian diplomatic corps remains the most significant source of risk of unwitting contact with an intelligence officer of a foreign power,” the report reads.

It highlights an “extensive approach to the use of undeclared intelligence officers using diplomatic cover”.

Russia’s embassy employs 44 accredited diplomats and 77 support staff while another 18 people, including eight diplomats, are employed at Russia’s consulates in Brno and Karlovy Vary.

The exact number of spies using diplomatic cover is known only to Moscow. But privately Czech officials believe it could be as high as 40%. In other words, they think many may be working for Russian intelligence or passing intelligence on to them.

Why Vienna is still a hotbed of spies

Looking for China’s spies

Around the corner from the cafe is a statue of Marshal Konev, the Russian general who liberated Prague in 1945 and went on to crush the Hungarian Uprising in 1956.

A brisk walk takes you through Pushkin Square, then on to Siberia Square and the Russian secondary school. Nearby are the Russian Cultural Centre, the Russian consulate and the Russian embassy – now a major headache for the Czech government.

One diplomatic source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the supersized Russian diplomatic presence also posed a threat to neighbouring Germany and Austria.

‘What does Russia want from us?’

The disproportionately high number of diplomatic cars registered to the embassy cannot be stopped or examined by police, and can travel easily around Europe’s passport-free Schengen travel area.

“Who knows what they’ve got in the boot?” my source wondered, adding that Prague was now beginning to “push back”, denying new Russian requests for vehicle registration.

“What does Russia want from us? It’s difficult to answer,” said journalist Jaroslav Spurny, who’s been writing about intelligence matters for 30 years.

“Partly it’s influence. They liberated us in 1945. They ‘liberated’ us again in 1968. They still see us as their sphere of influence. So on that level it’s quite primitive,” he explained.

“But we’re also part of the EU and Nato. The Russian intelligence services know very well where the weaknesses are, which countries can be exploited.”

“The Hungarians – well, the relationship with (Prime Minister) Orban isn’t so straightforward. The Poles – relations with them will never be great.”

“But with us Czechs it’s different. They occupied us for 20 years. They know us. They know how things work.”

Czechs still shiver from Soviet 1968 invasion

Czech PM denies son was kidnapped

Why China is becoming a Czech problem

The BIS report also warns of frenetic Chinese espionage activity, particularly in technology.

A separate alert came this month from the Czech National Cyber and Information Security Agency of a threat from Chinese IT giant Huawei.

“The Chinese approach is de facto just as hybrid as the Russian one,” said the intelligence agency, adding that Chinese career diplomats and businessmen represented the same risk as intelligence officers.

China, it says, has three aims:

using Czech entities to undermine EU unity

intelligence activity aimed at important Czech ministries

economic and technological spying

The report has led to a major spat between the BIS and Czech President Milos Zeman, who has made overtures to both Moscow and Beijing a centrepiece of his presidency.

How spy report angered Czech president

President Zeman described the BIS as “dilettantes” and the report as “blather”, provoking a rare public rebuke from the agency’s director.

That rebuke was countered by presidential spokesman Jiri Ovcacek, who told the BBC: “It is absolutely unacceptable for the director of the secret services of a Western country to indulge in political point-scoring.”

Critics accuse the president of deliberately working to undermine his own intelligence services, and insiders claim the BIS is now withholding sensitive information for fear it will be betrayed to the country’s adversaries.

The politically incorrect president dividing a nation

A particular problem, they say, are the president’s two closest advisers, who lack security clearance to see classified documents.

One formerly headed the Czech subsidiary of Russian oil giant Lukoil and was a key player in Mr Zeman’s presidential campaign.

The president’s office vigorously denies the claims.

“We certainly don’t want people to assume that every Russian is a potential spy,” said BIS spokesman Ladislav Sticha.

“What we’re saying is this: don’t give sensitive information to people you don’t know. All we’re advocating is common sense.”

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Repubblica Ceka. Forse referendum se lasciare l’Unione Europea. – Handelsblatt.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-03-28.

Repubblica Ceka 001

Se è vero che la libertà la si conquista con il sangue, è altrettanto vero che con il sangue la si mantiene.

Ecco perché la domanda che si pone Mr Clemens Fuest, presidente dell’Ifo, ha una unica risposta:

«Are you ready to risk your very good economic prospects for more independence?»

*

Domanda invero alquanto strana dal momento che i ceki sono i discenti di coloro che fecero la Primavera di Praga.

*

Poi, cerchiamo di essere chiari: perché mai condannare un governo che di fronte a scelte ardue si rimettesse alla volontà popolare indicendo un referendum?

Forse che la Svizzera, nazione tipica per l’esercizio referendario, sia una nazione anti democratica e fascista?

*

Il problema non è economico. Il problema è di dignità nazionale e, secondariamente, politico.

In estrema sintesi, l’attuale dirigenza europea constata che la maggioranza sulla quale si fondava si è squagliata come neve al sole. Nel giro di un anno in Francia i socialisti sono crollati dal 61% all’8%, in Germania l’Spd + scesa al 20% – ed ora vale ancor meno, ed in Italia il partito democratico è sceso dal 40.8% delle elezioni europee all’attuale 18.72%. Se è mutata la composizione del Consiglio Europeo, supremo organo di governo dell’Unione, l’anno prossimo le elezioni per il parlamento europeo riserveranno grandi ribaltamenti nella composizione politica di quel consesso.

Mr Juncker e Mr Tusk, e sodali vari, si stanno giocando adesso il tutto per tutto, si veda la nomina illegale di Mr Salmayr, per cercare di coronare il loro sogno politico: gli Stati Uniti di Europa con loro egemoni a vita.

Già: la loro rigidità è stato causa efficiente del Brexit, ed adesso è in atto uno scontro a tutto campo con i paesi del Visegrad e, più generalmente, dell’est europeo.

Questi paesi non intendono rinunciare alla propria sovranità nazionale né farsi governare da delle ngo finanziate con denari stranieri, né tanto meno rinunciare al proprio retaggio religioso, storico, culturale e sociale. Dal loro punto di vista ottima un’Unione Europea economica, benissimo un’Europa di stati, ottima una Unione Europea che dismetta le proprie velleità etiche e morali.

* * * * * * *

Noi non siamo e non intendiamo atteggiarci a profeti.

Nessuno può al momento predire quale potrebbe essere il risultato di un simile referendum.

Ribadiamo però con forza che riteniamo onesto e democratico ascoltare e mettere quindi in pratica la volontà popolare.

Non è dato l’essere democratici a geometria variabile, secondo mera convenienza.


Handelsblatt. 2018-03-26. The Czech economy is booming. But politicians are calling for a referendum on leaving the EU anyway. Business interests in the country, including German ones, are starting to fret.

Nearly two years after the Brexit bombshell, another EU member state is considering a stay-or-go referendum. Debate is raging in the Czech Republic over whether to let the people decide on membership of the 28-member European Union via direct democracy. Since every possible departure deserves a name, this one is being dubbed “Czexit.”

The country joined the EU in 2004 after a referendum in which locals voted 77 percent in favor. But there’s never been much enthusiasm for the EU from the country’s recent leadership. The country’s president, Milos Zeman, who is close to Russia, and his eurosceptic predecessor Vaclav Klaus have both talked down membership of the bloc. Mr. Zeman, who actually supported the Czech Republic’s entry to the EU, now says he is sympathetic to a referendum.

The party that has been ruling the country since October’s elections, Action for Dissatisfied Citizens, or ANO, has not given the official go-ahead for any such referendum. But the party’s leader, populist multimillionaire Andrej Babis, has also been critical of the EU.

—–

“Are you ready to risk your very good economic prospects for more independence?”

Clemens Fuest, president, Ifo economic research institute

—–

There are a number of other political heavyweights lending their voices to the cause. The Communist Party, ruler of the country before its democratic revolution in 1989, also favors a referendum. So does Tomio Okamura, the Czech-Japanese businessman who founded and leads the radical right-wing party, Freedom and Direct Democracy (SPD).

Mr. Babis’ current hold on power is precarious: ANO, founded in 2011, has no majority in parliament and although the party is most likely to team up with the communists or the Czech social democrats, there have also been talks with the extremely anti-EU Freedom and Direct Democracy party. Whoever ends up agreeing with ANO will surely influence whether a Czexit referendum goes ahead, or not.

All of this is happening despite the fact that the Czech Republic possibly benefits more than almost any other country from the EU’s single market. Between 2004 and 2017, gross national income, or GNI, at constant prices grew by 37 percent according to the Brussels-based economics think tank Bruegel. Across the whole of central and eastern Europe, per capita GDP grew by 52 percent between 2000 and 2007, on average.

“Most likely, EU membership played a strong role in these huge GNI growth rates,” Bruegel senior fellow, Zsolt Darvas, wrote. “By improving market institutions and the protection of property rights; by attracting foreign investment that brought new technologies and management skills … and perhaps the inflow of EU funds also supported the development of key infrastructure and competitiveness.”

There has also been a steady stream of German investment. Skoda, a Volkswagen subsidiary located close to Prague, is the largest industrial employer in the country. And in fact, the Czech Republic continues to bloom, with GDP growth at 4.5 percent and the lowest unemployment rate in Europe – so much so, that business has been calling for immigration to fill gaps.

All of which is why the prospect of any kind of Czexit vote is creating considerable anxiety in the business community. “People here have to realize that such very positive economic development will not continue if the country leaves the EU,” Clemens Fuest, head of the prestigious German economic research institute, Ifo, said while visiting Prague. “The question for the Czech people is this: Are you ready to risk your very good economic prospects for more independence?”

Business leaders are also sounding the alarm. “We do not view a Czexit as a viable possibility for improving the existing conditions,” said Milan Slachta, who was appointed CEO of German car supplier Bosch’s Czech subsidiary last year.

“None of the initiators of the debate have so far clearly stated what a Czexit would mean for the country, in economic, social or international terms,” noted Jörg Mathew, president of the Czech-German Chamber of Industry and Commerce and CFO of the Czech operations of the German construction company, Hochtief.

In fact, according to a survey of 150 companies in the country by the Czech-German Chamber of Industry and Commerce, 78 percent are worried about a possible departure from the EU. If it happened, 28 percent said they would consider changing location.


Emerging Europe. 2018-03-26. Euroscepticism is on the Rise in the Czech Republic

The Czech Republic has a long tradition of public euroscepticism, well documented by the pre- and post-accession Eurobarometer opinion polls which rank it among the countries with the lowest support for EU membership in central and eastern Europe. Even before accession to the EU, Czech politics featured a mainstream party with a eurosceptic stance, the Civic Democrats, led by Václav Klaus who later became the president of the country. The ‘return to Europe’ nevertheless remained the main foreign policy goal of the Czech Republic and its desire to become member of the EU (and NATO) was stronger than public and party-based forces which took a pessimistic stance towards further western European integration.

After accession, Czech public support for the EU increased, and mostly followed trends in economic development on the domestic as well as European stage, including the EU’s own economic and financial crises. Even the euroscepticism of the Civic Democrats has been muted compared to the pre-accession period, while long-term opponents of European integration such as the Communist Party have been irrelevant in setting Czech foreign policy. Moreover, the first decade of Czech membership has never seen outright demands for exiting the EU regardless of the current levels of euroscepticism. During recent years, however, eurosceptic forces has grown both at public and party level and raised historically unprecedented demands for holding a referendum about Czech membership of the EU.

So what has happened in the meantime? Is Czech euroscepticism on the rise?

There are a number of factors behind the revival of Czech euroscepticism to previously unseen heights. First, the trend of rising euroscepticism is connected to wider phenomena of dissatisfaction with how the mainstream political parties handle domestic and – especially – EU politics. Regardless of the specific composition of the governing coalition, each government has pursued a rather similar approach when it comes to EU policies and politics. On the domestic front, ‘Brussels’ represented a scapegoat for any unpopular decision, while at the EU level Czech governments pursued a passive and vision-free policy which only became offensively reactive if unfavourable proposals were adopted. In other words, credit for any popular policies was claimed by Czech governments, while the blame for unpopular policies was shifted to Brussels.

Laying the foundations

In doing this, successive Czech governments laid the foundations for the future escalation of euroscepticism. Such fertile land has not remained unploughed by political competitors. New parties have been established based on more or less pessimistic views. The ANO party, led by political entrepreneur Andrej Babiš, began to run on the basis of a pro-EU programme. Being ideologically unanchored, however, the ANO party soon derailed from its pro-EU direction. Sensing the dissatisfaction of people with the EU, its main leaders started to use eurosceptic discourse extensively. At the end of its first term of office in the government coalition, the party was dumped by two of its MEPs who were no longer able to identify with the party’s shift away from a pro-EU position and towards that of President Zeman, who openly maintains that people should be given the opportunity to vote about EU membership in a referendum.

Tomio Okamura’s Dawn of Direct Democracy (later dissolved and continued de facto as Freedom and Direct Democracy) has been openly eurosceptic since its inception. The success of the party in October 2017’s general election, and its current strong emphasis on holding a referendum regarding Czech EU membership is nevertheless connected to the second reason behind the revival of Czech euroscepticism.

The migration and refugee crisis of 2015, and the EU’s response to it, provided more fertile ground for the intensification of Czech euroscepticism. The relocation mechanisms (the so-called refugee quotas) have been a hot topic of each election held in the Czech Republic since 2015, namely the regional election of 2016, the general election of 2017, and the presidential election of 2018. Although all Czech parties rejected the ‘quotas’, only Freedom and Direct Democracy (in the general election) and Miloš Zeman in the presidential election were able to derive benefits from their Eurosceptic, anti-quota discourse. It is likely that other parties lacked credibility due to their almost permanent presence in the various coalition governments which have been responsible for Czech EU policy since the accession.

Having said this, the situation in the Czech Republic was not markedly different from the situation in Slovakia.

Why then is euroscepticism lower in Slovakia, where people accept the prime minister’s desire to be a core EU member, including membership in the Eurozone? The answer is related to a third reason behind Czech euroscepticism. The Czech Republic has history of omnipresent eurosceptic leaders going back to the 1990s with the Civic Democrats and the then prime minister Václav Klaus in particular. A year before Czech accession to the EU, Mr Klaus became President. While the presidency in the Czech Republic is mainly a ceremonial position, his influence on society rested in his strongly eurosceptic discourse and even some political decisions such as refusing to sign the Lisbon Treaty until the Czech Republic had been given an opt out from the EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights. (Mr Klaus believed that the charter could lead to the revocation of the Beneš decrees).

Flying the flag

Miloš Zeman became president when the second term of Václav Klaus came to an end. While he has proclaimed himself a persuaded Euro-federalist and even hung the EU flag at the Prague Castle – something Václav Klaus refused to do – his actions and discourse remained deeply eurosceptic, potentially reflecting the opinion of his core voters in rural and remote areas. The contemporary phenomena behind the revival of Czech euroscepticism, namely dissatisfaction of the political mainstream handling of EU politics and related rise of new eurosceptic parties, can build upon firm foundation built by major political leaders of past and present.

Now, is the Czech Republic heading towards a Czexit referendum? Not quite. The Czech constitutional and legal framework lacks any provision for holding a general referendum. The only referendum so far on Czech accession to the EU was held on the basis of a specifically adopted constitutional law. The main battle of today when it comes to Czexit is about the adoption of a general referendum constitutional bill. In theory, parties supporting the adoption of such a bill (ANO, SPD, Pirates and Communists) have a constitutional majority in the lower chamber but lack it in the upper house. The results of upper house election in October 2018 will hence be critical.

As theory is grey and green is the tree of life, the proponents of the referendum bill in the lower house significantly differ on whether EU membership can be the subject of a referendum. While the Pirates, SPD and Communists strongly advocate this option, ANO rejects it. The reason is simple. While Andrej Babiš ‘responds to the will of the people’ when it comes to adapting his discourse to the general anti-EU mood among Czech citizens, one of his darkest (business) nightmares is a Czech Republic outside the EU. The battle is thus not over. Even if a pro-referendum bill gets a constitutional majority this October, the real debate will be about the details, such as whether the membership of international organisations can be the subject of a referendum, the number of citizens’ signatures required to call a referendum, and the turnout and majority thresholds needed to make referendum valid and binding.

Czexit will not happen overnight, but the conditions have never been as favourable before. If it indeed happens, its impact on this medium-sized country surrounded by EU member states will nevertheless far exceed even the worst-case scenario Britain is currently looking at.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Repubblica Ceka. Rivolta aperta contro le ngo di Mr Soros.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-02-15.

Repubblica Ceka 001

Non ha vinto Mr Zeman. Hanno perso liberal e socialisti. – Bloomberg.

«È in corso una grandioso fenomeno di devoluzione dall’ideologia socialista che ha improntato gli ultimi decenni della vita sociale e politica occidentale.

Gli elettori a livello mondiale non concedono più il loro suffragio né ai liberal democratici né ai socialisti ideologici. Non ne vogliono più sapere.

Il 27 gennaio 2018 nella Repubblica Ceka Mr Milos Zeman ha vinto le elezioni con il 51.64% dei voti validi, contro il 48.35% di Mr Jiri Drahos.»

*

L’attuale establishment dell’Unione Europea, forse sarebbe meglio dire i rottami di quello che fu e che ancora incombono, considerano chiaramente anti-democratico quel paese che non ne voglia sapere di vedere operare sul proprio territorio le ngo di Mr Soros. E lo considerano talmente autoritario e dittatoriale da trascinarlo di fronte alla Corte di Giustizia di Strasburgo. Tribunale che sia a Strasburgo non ci piove, ma che sia ‘corte di giustizia‘ sarebbe invero altamente opinabile: assomiglia fortemente ad un tribunale giacobino.

*

Nella Repubblica ceka si sono svolte libere elezioni e gli Elettori si sono espressi altrettanto liberamente nelle urne. Qualsiasi persona veramente democratica avrebbe accettato il risultato contento: liberal e socialisti no, non sono democratici. Sono rivoluzionari e dittatoriali. E pure petitivi.

Dopo il durissimo attacco del The Washington Times

Trump attacca frontalmente Mr Soros come un toro infuriato.

e la rivolta degli inglesi alle ingerenze di Mr Soros nella loro politica

Soros finanzia la campagna anti-Brexit. Inglesi irritati.

ecco riprendere la lotta della Repubblica Ceka contro le ngo di Mr Soros.

«Czech anti-immigrant party accused financier George Soros of imposing “supranational governance” on the country, joining a surge of politicians calling for a crackdown on non-governmental organizations in ex-communist Europe»

*

«Attack against Soros echoes statements by other leaders»

*

«Their goal is to destroy national identity and natural cultural and social values, push positive discrimination and immigration in the interest of the global world order»

*

«Traditionally seen as a pro-Western safe haven for foreign investors, the country has moved more toward anti-immigration and anti-EU rhetoric, coinciding with a wave of opposition to the EU’s liberal, multi-cultural values in members Hungary, Poland, Romania that has emboldened political forces to dismantle democratic checks and balances»

*

«Soros has denounced the campaigns against him across eastern Europe. Having donated more than $400 million to his native country and hundreds of millions more across eastern Europe since the 1989 fall of communism, his main philanthropic focus is on protecting the rights of minorities, the poor and the underprivileged»

*

Poniamoci adesso una domanda.

Visto che l’attuale dirigenza dell’Unione Europea (diciamo attuale perché non è a vita, come l’esempio di Herr Schulz dovrebbe rendere ben evidente) considera tirannica quella nazione che non voglia accettare le benemerite ngo di Mr Soros, non sarà mai che sia anche essa a ruolino paga del filantropo?

E poi, chi mai obbligherebbe ad accettarle?

p.s.

Qualcuno poi potrebbe per cortesia avvisare Bloomberg che nella Repubblica Ceka i liberal ed i socialisti ideologici hanno perso sia le elezioni politiche sia quelle presidenziali? I liberal si sentono tanto impettiti? Bene: che vincano le elezioni, invece di perderle regolarmente.


Bloomberg. 2018-01-30. Czech Extremist Party Joins Regional Push to Curb Soros NGOs

– Anti-Muslim SPD party helped president Zeman win re-election

– Attack against Soros echoes statements by other leaders

*

A Czech anti-immigrant party accused financier George Soros of imposing “supranational governance” on the country, joining a surge of politicians calling for a crackdown on non-governmental organizations in ex-communist Europe.

Freedom and Direct Democracy, which holds more than a 10th of the 200 seats in parliament, said it will support steps limiting the influence of such entities in Czech politics and media, according to a statement on Tuesday. Known as SPD, it’s calling for the country to follow Britain out of the European Union and said it will emulate measures taken by Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, who has based his April election campaign on attack ads against Hungarian-born Soros and passed Russian-style laws to stigmatize groups funded from abroad.

“The vehicle of this governance are nonprofit organizations with political and ideological programs and financial as well as personal links to George Soros’s organizational network,” SPD, led by anti-Islamic leader Tomio Okamura, wrote in the statement. “Their goal is to destroy national identity and natural cultural and social values, push positive discrimination and immigration in the interest of the global world order.”

The statement by SPD, a party allied to newly re-elected President Milos Zeman, underscores a shift in the political climate in the Czech Republic. Traditionally seen as a pro-Western safe haven for foreign investors, the country has moved more toward anti-immigration and anti-EU rhetoric, coinciding with a wave of opposition to the EU’s liberal, multi-cultural values in members Hungary, Poland, Romania that has emboldened political forces to dismantle democratic checks and balances.

Capping an anti-Muslim campaign that won him a second five-year term, Zeman praised Okamura for his support on Saturday as the SPD leader stood behind him when he gave his victory speech. Zeman has pushed for stronger ties with Russia, whose leader Vladimir Putin has also cracked down on foreign-funded NGOs and China, which many western countries have criticized for human-rights abuses.

The president has also warned Muslim immigrants — a cohort almost non-existent in the Czech Republic — will seek to impose Shariah law, while Okamura has encouraged Czechs to harass Muslims by walking dogs and pigs in front of mosques and boycott kebab shops.

In Hungary, Orban has used taxpayer funds for a national mail-in survey and a billboard campaign and a “Stop Soros” legislative package that is purportedly aimed at curbing the influence of the philanthropist, a Jew who fled the country after World War II.

Soros has denounced the campaigns against him across eastern Europe. Having donated more than $400 million to his native country and hundreds of millions more across eastern Europe since the 1989 fall of communism, his main philanthropic focus is on protecting the rights of minorities, the poor and the underprivileged.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Non ha vinto Mr Zeman. Hanno perso liberal e socialisti. – Bloomberg

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-01-29.

Czech_Republic_map.001

Diamo atto a Mr Putin di aver inquadrato quanto sta accadendo con la solita sintesi tranchant:

«political schizophrenia» [Mr Putin – Bloomberg]

*

Nel corso dell’ultimo anno è accaduta una serie impressionante di fatti coerenti, nonotòni direbbe un matematico, la presa di coscienza dei quali dovrebbe essere mandatoria per cercare di comprendere quanto stia accadendo.

È in corso una grandioso fenomeno di devoluzione dall’ideologia socialista che ha improntato gli ultimi decenni della vita sociale e politica occidentale.

Gli elettori a livello mondiale non concedono più il loro suffragio né ai liberal democratici né ai socialisti ideologici. Non ne vogliono più sapere.

Questi i fatti, gli eventi elettorali.

– Il 20 gennaio 2017 si è insediato il Presidente Trump, che a novembre aveva conquistato 304 grandi elettori contro i 227 di Mrs Hillary Clinton, del partito democratico.

– Il 10 aprile 2017 il Senato Americano ha approvato la nomina del Justice Neil Gorsuch nella Suprema Corte degli Stati Uniti. ‘Gorsuch is a proponent of textualism in statutory interpretation and originalism in interpreting the U.S. Constitution, and is an advocate of natural law jurisprudence.’ Ora la Suprema Corte è a maggioranza repubblicana.

– Il 7 maggio 2017 alle elezioni presidenziali francesi il partito socialista francese è crollato dal 62% all’8%.

– Il 21 settembre 2017 Mr Macron ha conquistato 22 su 171 seggi senatoriali.

– Il 24 settembre 2017 le elezioni federali politiche sanzionavano la perdita di 153 deputati della Große Koalition: la Cdu crollava al 32.9% e l’Spd al 20.5%.

– Il 15 ottobre in Austria Herr Sebastian Kurz trionfava alle elezioni austriache con il 31.6%, e l’Fpö raggiungeva il 26.0%.

– Il 21 – 22 ottobre 2017 nella Repubblica Ceka il partito Ano 2011 conseguiva il 29.6% dei voti (78 / 200 seggi), mentre il Čssd, la socialdemocrazia, crollava dal 20.5% del 2013 al 7.3% dei voti.

– Il 5 novembre 2017 in Slovakia, alle elezioni regionali, la Smer, partito socialista del presidente Fico, ha perso il controllo di quattro delle sei regioni. Nelle elezioni politiche del 2012 aveva conseguito il 44.4% dei voti, il 28.3% in quelle del 2016, il 26.2% nelle regionali.

– Il 27 gennaio 2018 nella Repubblica Ceka Mr Milos Zeman ha vinto le elezioni con il 51.64% dei voti validi, contro il 48.35% di Mr Jiri Drahos.

Questi gli atti politici di rilevanza.

– Il 6 dicembre il Congresso degli Stati Uniti ha rigettato 364 – 58 la istanza democratica di impeachment al Presidente Trump. 123 deputati democratici hanno votato contro assieme ai repubblicani.

– L’8 dicembre la Polonia ha approvato la riforma del sistema giudiziario.

– Il 20 settembre il Congresso Americano ha approvato la riforma fiscale statunitense.

– Il 21 dicembre la Romania approva la riforma del sistema giudiziario.

– Il 27 gennaio 2018 Mr Trump in una cena a Davos con il Gotha dell’industria europea ricevere impegni di investimenti negli Stati Uniti per 600 miliardi di dollari.

*

Orbene.

Il dato che emerge chiaramente è che l’ideologia liberal e quella socialista hanno fatto il loro tempo.

La morte del socialismo corrisponde, grosso modo, alla morte della concezione statalista, con tutte le sue conseguenze.

Morto il socialismo, restano vivi gli ex socialisti: non ci si illuda, potrebbero aver colpi di coda. Solo quando Sorella Morte li abbia falciati il mondo sarà libero da quella genia.

Privati del governo delle nazioni, liberal e socialisti sono ancora molto forti nel deep state: burocrazia, tribunali e media.

Questi sono poteri che tipicamente devolveranno più lentamente del poter politico. Poi, alla fine, Sorella Morte, come già ricordato, avrà il sopravvento. Sono infatti gli anziani a reggere per larga quota queste ideologie.

*

«Zeman very clearly established his anti-immigration position and that decided the election, …. He appealed to voters with lower incomes and lower education levels who felt they finally had someone in the highest echelons of politics to defend them»

*

«The victory represents a win for anti-establishment political forces who are fighting against the EU’s liberal, multi-cultural values, bolstering a group that includes Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban and Poland’s ruling Law & Justice Party.»

*

«It also extends a domestic alliance with billionaire Prime Minister Andrej Babis, with whom Zeman shares opposition to further European integration and acceptance of refugees from Africa and the Middle East in a country that has an almost non-existent Muslim minority»

*

No. Assolutamente no.

La forza politica di Mr Zeman non si fonda sul fatto di essere contro qualcosa o qualcuno: si fonda invece sulla tutela del retaggio religioso, storico, culturale, sociale ed artistico della Repubblica Ceka.

È ovvio quindi che sia “anti-establishment”.

Questa dirigenza non è “liberale”, bensì “liberal”: nutre l’ideologia della perversione nella mente e nel cuore.

«Zeman shares opposition to further European integration»??

Sicuramente sì: è una persona onesta.

Opporsi all’integrazione europea non è una eresia né uno svarione logico: è solo non condividere l’ideologia liberal.

Ma non ce lo si dimentichi.

Il popolo ceko si è espresso chiaramente con le urne: proprio non ne vuole sapere di continuare a votare i liberal.

E questi liberal sono ridicolmente patetici a scrivere articoli come se fossero ancora al governo di qualcosa.

La storia li ha già condannati: proprio quella storia che Hegel chiamava a supremo giudice.

Permettete di ripeterci: la gente lo li vota più.


Bloomberg. 2018-01-28. Putin Ally Zeman Wins Second Term as Czech President

– Czech incumbent beats political novice Drahos in runoff ballot

– Zeman’s winning campaign linked Muslim refugees with terrorism

*

Czech President Milos Zeman, an ardent supporter of Russian leader Vladimir Putin, won a second term in an election victory after warning voters that sheltering Muslim immigrants could lead to terrorist attacks.

Zeman, 73, who was also an early fan of U.S. President Donald Trump, took 51.4 percent of votes in a two-day ballot that ended Saturday, according results published by the Statistics Office. His challenger for the largely ceremonial post, 68-year-old chemistry professor Jiri Drahos, pledged to anchor the nation of 10.6 million more firmly in the European Union and NATO. He conceded after getting 48.6 percent.

The victory represents a win for anti-establishment political forces who are fighting against the EU’s liberal, multi-cultural values, bolstering a group that includes Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban and Poland’s ruling Law & Justice Party. It also extends a domestic alliance with billionaire Prime Minister Andrej Babis, with whom Zeman shares opposition to further European integration and acceptance of refugees from Africa and the Middle East in a country that has an almost non-existent Muslim minority.

“Zeman very clearly established his anti-immigration position and that decided the election,” said Jakub Charvat, political scientist at the Metropolitan University in Prague. “He appealed to voters with lower incomes and lower education levels who felt they finally had someone in the highest echelons of politics to defend them.”

The Czech Republic boasts one of the EU’s fastest-growing economies, its lowest unemployment and the highest living standards among the bloc’s eastern members. But the election showed a division between those reaping the benefits of the post-communist transition toward an economy integrated with richer western neighbors and poorer people who feel the country’s success has passed them by.

Zeman’s critics say his efforts to strengthen ties with Russia and China have undermined Czech relations with western allies. The veteran politician — whose three-decade career includes stints as prime minister and speaker of parliament — rejects the idea, saying he’s trying to help Czech exporters. He derides his opponents as part of a “Prague coffee-house society” detached from the lives of ordinary people.

Zeman’s win changes the timetable for Babis’s efforts to build another cabinet after his minority administration was forced to resign when lawmakers rejected it in a confidence motion this month. Zeman, who calls himself the “president of the bottom 10 million” Czechs, said after the election that he will give Babis more time to negotiate support before naming him premier for the second time. Babis backed the president in the election.

The complicated political situation hasn’t affected Czech assets as investors focus mainly on prospects for more interest-rate hikes after two increases last year. The koruna has strengthened 1 percent versus the euro so far in 2018, extending gains from last year when it was the best performer among the world’s major currencies.

Zeman calls himself a euro-federalist, but he’s also suggested that the Czech Republic should hold a Brexit-style referendum to leave the EU. He said he’d vote to stay in although people should have a choice.

Surrounded by allies during his acceptance speech, including Tomio Okamura, leader of an extreme anti-Muslim party, Freedom and Direct Democracy, that wants take the Czech Republic out of the EU, the president called for allowing the public more decisions via popular votes.

“I promise I will keep working the way I have so far,” he told supporters in Prague. “I want to fight for something I call active citizenship.”

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Repubblica Ceka. Mr Zeman riconfermato Presidente.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-01-27.

Caravaggio. Davide con la testa di Golia

«Zeman has polled 110,000 votes more in 2018 than 2013. An impressive achievement given his poor health and patchy performance/campaign»

*

«Zeman won the first round on January 12-13, picking up 38.56 percent of the vote, from a field of nine candidates. Drahos came in second with 26.60 percent.»

*

«The national statistics office CSU said with results from more than 98 percent of voting districts counted, Zeman had 51.64 percent of the vote versus 48.35 percent for his opponent, former Academy of Sciences head Jiri Drahos.»

*

«Turnout was 66.5 percent of the country’s 8.4 million eligible voters»

*

«Brussels-based EU affairs analyst Vojtech Nemec put Zeman’s success down to his support among poorer and rural voters.»

*

«Zeman’s pro-Russian stance and support for closer ties with China has divided the nation …. »

*

«He’s also a leading critic in eastern European states of the EU’s migrant sharing policy, which aims to evenly distribute migrants and refugees from Africa and the Middle East throughout the bloc»

*

«His anti-migrant and anti-Muslim rhetoric has won him support with many voters.»

* * * * * * * *

Così, con l’impegno della repubblica Ceka, è stato fatto un altro passo in avanti nella devoluzione dell’ideologia libera e socialista.

Liberal e socialisti avevano impiegato nella campagna elettorale fondi fantasmagorici; avevano finanziato un grande numero di cortei, ove le stesse identiche facce si facevano vedere in ogni parte del paese ed erano indicate come il “popolo ceko“; tutte le ngo (ogn) di Mr Soros erano scese in campo ed infine la macchina del fango aveva lavorato a pieno ritmo contro Mr Zeman e Mr Babis.

Adesso, al conto delle schede, si deve constatare come il “popolo ceko” non appoggi minimamente né l’ideologia liberal e tanto meno quella socialista. A loro scorno, Mr Zeman ha conquistato addirittura 110,000 voti in più rispetto le elezioni precedenti.

Da perfetti razzisti, sbeffeggiano l’elettorato di Mr Zeman perché

«his support among poorer and rural voters».

È vero, Mr Zeman e Mr Babis danno voce ai poveri, ai miseri ed a quelli che lavorano nel comparto produttivo.

Ma anche poveri, miseri e lavoratori sono esseri umani. Anche loro sono Cittadini Elettori.

*

Una ultima conclusione.

Quanto accaduto nella Repubblica Ceka è maieutico.

Liberal e socialisti ideologici sono una minoranza: il popolo sovrano non ne vuole più sapere di loro, dei loro fallimenti, delle loro prese di posizione contro natura, del loro odio contro la religione ed il retaggio storico e culturale delle nazioni.

Ripetiamo solo per chiarezza: la gente non ne può di più di quella gente arrogante e presuntuosa quanto corrotta ed incapace.

I media millantino pure ciò che credono: tanto poi i conti si fanno alle urne. E questo risultato la conta lunga anche su quanto valgano i media di regime: cascami della storia.

E, diciamolo francamente, anche il 4 marzo se ne vedranno delle belle.

Sole 24 Ore. 2018-01-27. Repubblica Ceca, il filorusso Zeman confermato presidente con il 52% dei voti

Il presidente in carica della Repubblica Ceca, Milos Zeman, ha vinto il suo secondo mandato alla guida del paese. Quando mancano pochi seggi da scrutinare, Zeman si è aggiudicato quasi il 52% dei voti contro il 48,35% dello sfidante Jiri Drahos, che ha già ammesso la sconfitta. L’affluenza registrata alle urne è stata del 66,5%. L’esito si era già profilato nell’arco della giornata, quando il gap tra Zeman e Drahos ha iniziato ad allargarsi fino ai risultati in via di ufficializzazione. Drahos, un accademico vicino a posizioni europeiste, ha provato a opporsi alla riconferma di Zeman con un programma favorevole alla maggiore integrazione nella Ue. Le urne hanno dato ragione al presidente in uscita, noto per la sua linea anti-immigrazione e la ricerca di maggiori legami con Russia e Cina.

La conferma del “Trump boemo”

A quanto sottolineano le agenzie internazionali, il (secondo) successo di Zeman riproduce la frattura tra liberali e conservatori che si è già manifestato nel resto di Europa e in occasioni delle elezioni americane. Zeman, emerso nel periodo post-comunista degli anni ’90, aveva appoggiato Trump in occasione delle presidenziali del 2016 e si è distinto per una campagna dai toni forti su immigrazione e euroscetticismo. Anche se non ha mai messo in discussione l’appartenenza alla Ue, Zeman si è detto favorevole a un referendum per l’uscita dall’eurozona e si è già smarcato di fatto dalle posizioni di Bruxelles e Nato. Per quanto riguarda il tema dei migranti, il presidente ha tratto vantaggio dalle tensioni xenofobe e anti-islamiche che stanno percorrendo il paese. La Repubblica Ceca ha ricevuto appena 116 richieste d’asilo dal gennaio al novembre dell’anno scorso e la comunità musulmana non va oltre le poche migliaia di cittadini.

Deutsche Welle. 2018-01-27. Pro-Russian Milos Zeman wins Czech Republic presidential runoff

Incumbent Milos Zeman has won a second term in office after victory in the Czech Republic’s presidential runoff. The two-day poll was held days after the government resigned after failing to win a confidence vote.

*

Czech Republic President Milos Zeman on Saturday was declared the winner of the country’s presidential election runoff, official results showed.

The national statistics office CSU said with results from more than 98 percent of voting districts counted, Zeman had 51.64 percent of the vote versus 48.35 percent for his opponent, former Academy of Sciences head Jiri Drahos.

Turnout was 66.5 percent of the country’s 8.4 million eligible voters, the CSU reported.

Polls closed at 2 p.m. local time (1300 UTC) on Saturday following two days of voting, and the first results began to trickle out shortly after.

Zeman confirmed within hours

Less than two hours later, the majority of votes had been counted, and Zeman was awarded a second five-year term in the largely ceremonial role.

The 73-year-old incumbent took an early lead from ballots counted in rural districts. Drahos was expected to win more support amongst more educated voters in urban areas, but failed to capitalize on his pro-European stance.

He quickly conceded defeat in front of his supporters, a few minutes after the result was announced.

Brussels-based EU affairs analyst Vojtech Nemec put Zeman’s success down to his support among poorer and rural voters.

University College London politics senior lecturer Sean Hanley said the incumbent won over more voters than in the last election in 2013.

President and PM aligned

One of the Czech president’s duties is to select the prime minister.

Despite the fall of the Czech government this week, led by populist Andrej Babis, Zeman — a former left-wing prime minister — asked his ally to try again to form a new administration. He had vowed to swear Babis in again before his term expires on March 8. The PM is fighting police charges of EU subsidy fraud.

Zeman’s pro-Russian stance and support for closer ties with China has divided the nation.

He’s also a leading critic in eastern European states of the EU’s migrant sharing policy, which aims to evenly distribute migrants and refugees from Africa and the Middle East throughout the bloc. His anti-migrant and anti-Muslim rhetoric has won him support with many voters.

Zeman won the first round on January 12-13, picking up 38.56 percent of the vote, from a field of nine candidates. Drahos came in second with 26.60 percent.

He is the Czech Republic’s third president, after Vaclav Havel and Vaclav Klaus, and five years ago became the first to be picked by voters not politicians.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Repubblica Ceka. Presidenziali. Secondo turno.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-01-27.

2018-01-27__Zeman_001

In serata di oggi dovrebbe essere stata scrutinata la maggior parte delle schede elettorali e reso noto chi sarà il prossimo Presidente della Repubblica Ceka.

Pubblichiamo le ultime prospezioni elettorali, tenendo conto che sembrerebbe essere un testa a testa impredicibile. Tuttavia questi dati saranno utili per poter valutare l’affidabilità di questi sondaggi elettorali e selezionare la società più attendibile.

Una nota a margine.

I media riportano che questa sarebbe “a tightly contested presidential election run-off“.

In parte hanno ragione.

I liberal ed i socialisti ideologici di tutta l’Unione Europea si sono scatenati contro Mr Zeman, che non la pensa come loro. Lo hanno accusato di tutto e di più: forse hanno omesso la guida con gomme lisce

In un contesto di devoluzione globale, i liberal ed i socialisti sembrerebbero non rassegnarsi, e nella Repubblica Ceka hanno mobilitato tutte le loro forze disponibili a livello continentale, investendo anche somme ingenti.

E sembrerebbe lecito prognosticare una campagna severamente diffamatoria contro Mr Zeman, qualora vincesse le elezioni: a lor dire sarebbe ‘politicamente incorretto‘. Di certo, non rispetteranno il verdetto delle urne.


Bbc. 2018-01-27. Czech election: Tight run-off between Zeman and Drahos

Czechs have been going to the polls in a tightly contested presidential election run-off, seen as a vote on the Czech Republic’s direction.

The election sees pro-Russia and anti-immigration President Milos Zeman seeking a second five-year term against Jiri Drahos, a pro-EU academic with no previous political experience.

Polls suggest that 10% of voters are still undecided.

Polling stations will reopen for a second day on Saturday.

Voting will end at 13:00GMT, with the result expected a few hours later.

The politically incorrect president dividing a nation

Voting on Friday, Mr Zeman said Mr Drahos lacked experience.

“My opponent is someone who has not yet practiced politics,” he said.

Meanwhile Mr Drahos thanked his supporters, saying their “energy will not be thwarted, whatever the outcome”, AFP reported.

In the first round, Mr Zeman had 38.6% of the vote while Mr Drahos won 26.6%. Most of the defeated candidates have since endorsed Mr Drahos.

The election has reflected divisions between low-income voters with lower education and those living in rural areas, who tend to vote for Mr Zeman, and wealthier and well-educated residents of bigger cities, who are likely to prefer Mr Drahos, correspondents say.

The post of president is largely ceremonial but hugely influential. It picks, for instance, which politician can form a government.

Mr Zeman has promised to give Prime Minister Andrej Babis, a billionaire businessman, a second chance to form a government after his minority cabinet lost a confidence vote in parliament last week.

Mr Zeman’s current presidency does not end until March, so he plans to reappoint Mr Babis next month.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Repubblica Ceka. Elezioni Presidenziali. Primo round. Risultati definitivi.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-01-14.

2018-01-14__Rep_Ceka__001

Questi riportati da Volby sono i risultati definitivi delle elezioni presidenziali.

Mr Miloš Zeman ha conseguito 1,985,547 (38.56%) voti validi, Mr Jiří Drahoš 1,369,601 (26.60%) e Mr Pavel Fisher 526,694 (10.23%).


Alcune considerazioni sembrerebbe essere doverose.

La prima considerazione verte i valori prognosticati dalle diverse società di rilevamento.

Negli ultimi mesi Mr Miloš Zeman era quotato 42.5%, 45.5%, 29.0%. 29.0%, 31.4%, 34.8%, 32.0%, 31.0%, mentre Mr Jiří Drahoš era quotato 27.5%, 27.2%, 19.8%, 14.0%, 20.2%, 17.9%, 21.5%, 17.0%.

Emerge evidente come, a parte le ultime due rilevazioni, ambedue i candidati siano stati cospicuamente sottovalutati, ben al di sotto dell’errore di campionamento del ±5%.

Non solo, ma rilevazioni effettuate a distanza di qualche giorno avevano esitato in valori significativamente differenti: 14% versus 27.2%. Sono 13.2 punti percentuali di discrepanza.

Ci si rende perfettamente conto della difficoltà insita nelle proiezioni elettorali, specie poi quando il clima elettorale sia teso, ma discrepanze di questa entità pongono serie remore sull’affidabilità di questi risultati.

Queste considerazioni sembrerebbero pesare su come valutare le prospezioni per il secondo turno, in cui Mr Zeman si confronterà con Mr Drahoš: le proiezioni sarebbero concordi nell’accordare la vittoria a Mr Drahoš con un 48.0% – 55.5% contro 42.0% – 49.0%. La differenza tra le stime dei due candidati si aggirerebbe attorno all’errore di campionamento, per cui questi dati dovrebbero essere considerati solo come ordine di grandezza.

Di conseguenza, a nostro personale modo di vedere, saremmo portati a considerare un testa a testa al momento non predicibile in modo ragionevolmente sicuro.

Si noti come in questa sede l’analisi sia esclusivamente numerica, statistica, non politica.

*

La seconda considerazione verte il modo con cui la stampa ha riportato la notizia.

Orbene, se la legge considera due turni elettorali evidentemente prevede che chi ottenga la maggioranza relativa al primo turno possa perderla a secondo: in caso contrario il secondo round sarebbe del tutto inutile. Nulla di disonorevole nel fatto, ovviamente.

Miloš Zeman to face run-off after topping Czech presidential elections [The Guardian]

Czech election: Zeman faces presidential run-off against Drahos [Bbc]

The Latest: Czech president has big lead in early results [Fox News]

*

La frase caratteristica, che sembrerebbe essere stata ricopiata da una velina fonte generatrice, è questa:

«Czech President Milos Zeman failed to win re-election during the first round of voting on Saturday and will face a runoff election in two weeks against the former head of the country’s Academy of Sciences Jiri Drahos».

No. Mr Miloš Zeman ha vinto, e con ottimo margine, il primo turno elettorale.

Per il secondo turno si vedrà: ma mentre il primo turno pesa quanto valgono i singoli candidati, il secondo pesa invece quanto valgono le coalizioni. Sono due concetti del tutto differenti.

In ogni caso, a nostro sommesso parere, un articolo serio riporta prima dati e/o fatti, quindi, a seguito, il commento: non li mischia assieme.

Si diffidi da quanti vogliono manipolare le menti dei lettori miscelando dati e giudizi.