Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Psichiatria

G20. 15 e 16 novembre. Joe Biden il demente e sfiduciato renderà quella riunione inconcludente.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-10-31.

2022-10-07__ Biden Pazzo 001

«there is currently no credible way for the world to deliver on the central goal of Paris.»

* * *

«Il Gruppo 20 (o G20) è un forum dei leader, dei ministri delle finanze e dei governatori delle banche centrali, creato nel 1999, dopo una successione di crisi finanziarie per favorire l’internazionalità economica e la concertazione tenendo conto delle nuove economie in sviluppo. Di esso fanno parte l’Unione Europea e 19 paesi tra i più industrializzati del mondo: Arabia Saudita, Argentina, Australia, Brasile, Canada, Cina, Corea del Sud, India, Indonesia, Francia, Germania, Giappone, Italia, Messico, Regno Unito, Russia, Stati Uniti, Sudafrica, Turchia. Il G20 rappresenta i due terzi del commercio e della popolazione mondiale, oltre all’80% del PIL mondiale.» [Fonte]

«The 17th G20 Heads of State and Government Summit will take place at November 2022 in Bali. The Summit will be the pinnacle of the G20 process and intense work carried out within the Ministerial Meetings, Working Groups, and Engagement Groups throughout the year.» [G20 Indonesia 2022]

«Joe Biden non ha alcuna intenzione di incontrarsi con Vladimir Putin al G20 di Bali: lo ha reso noto la Casa Bianca.» E ci mancherebbe! Quale senso avrebbe mai un summit con un Joe Biden demente e che per di più a tale data avrà perso il controllo politico del Congresso?

* * * * * * *

                         L’Ucraina rende imprevedibile il vertice del G20, da tenersi a Bali il 15 ed il 16 novembre. I leader mondiali stanno effettuando gli ultimi preparativi per quello che potrebbe essere un vertice del G20 di grande impatto il mese prossimo, che ha il potenziale per essere la riunione multilaterale più imprevedibile degli ultimi anni. Ciò è dovuto non da ultimo al conflitto in Ucraina, giunto al nono mese, che ha scosso il panorama internazionale. Le tensioni sull’invasione di Mosca hanno già causato fuochi d’artificio diplomatici al G20 di quest’anno.

                         I leader occidentali, che si riuniranno per la prima volta dopo le riunioni del G7 e della NATO tenutesi in estate in Europa, utilizzeranno il vertice per rinnovare la loro strategia sull’Ucraina. Daranno inoltre il benvenuto al nuovo primo ministro britannico Rishi Sunak e discuteranno di sfide più ampie, comprese quelle provenienti dalla Cina. Secondo Widodo, anche se Putin potrebbe non partecipare di persona al vertice, altri capi di Stato lo faranno.

                         Una delle questioni economiche correlate che verranno discusse è l’aumento dei prezzi dell’energia. Questo problema urgente, che sarà anche un argomento chiave di discussione durante l’incontro dei leader mondiali alla COP27 in Egitto il 7-8 novembre, è stato evidenziato in un importante rapporto pubblicato giovedì dalle Nazioni Unite, in cui si afferma che attualmente non esiste un modo credibile per il mondo di raggiungere l’obiettivo centrale di Parigi.

* * * * * * *

«Ukraine makes for unpredictable G20 summit. World leaders are making their final preparations for what could be a blockbuster G20 summit next month, which has the potential to be the most unpredictable multilateral meetings of recent years. This is not least because of the Ukraine conflict, now in its ninth month, which has shaken up the international landscape. Tensions over Moscow’s invasion already caused diplomatic fireworks in the G20 this year.»

«Western leaders, who will be gathering for the first time since the G7 and NATO meetings over the summer in Europe, will use the summit to renew their Ukraine strategy. They will also welcome new UK Prime Minister Rishi Sunak into their midst and discuss wider challenges, including those originating from China. According to Widodo, while Putin might not attend the summit in person, other heads of state will»

«One of the related economic issues that will be discussed is surging energy prices. This pressing matter, which will also be a key topic for discussion during the world leaders’ gathering at COP27 in Egypt on November 7-8, was highlighted in a major report published on Thursday by the UN, which asserted that there is currently no credible way for the world to deliver on the central goal of Paris.»

* * * * * * *


Ukraine makes for unpredictable G20 summit

World leaders are making their final preparations for what could be a blockbuster G20 summit next month, which has the potential to be the most unpredictable multilateral meetings of recent years.

This is not least because of the Ukraine conflict, now in its ninth month, which has shaken up the international landscape. Tensions over Moscow’s invasion already caused diplomatic fireworks in the G20 this year. The group’s foreign ministers clashed during their meeting in Bali over the summer, with Russia’s Sergey Lavrov walking out of meetings at least twice.

With Ukraine proving so divisive, there are potentially huge barriers to any constructive discussion taking place. For instance, Western leaders fear Russia is likely to try to use a possible extension of the UN-brokered Black Sea grain-export deal as a way to gain leverage in other discussions.

Ahead of the expiry on Nov. 19 of the existing agreement, which kick-started Ukrainian grain exports in recent weeks, Moscow has repeatedly stated there are serious problems with it. So a potential extension of the deal could prove to be a centerpiece of the summit, with Russia holding court on the issue.

Western leaders, who will be gathering for the first time since the G7 and NATO meetings over the summer in Europe, will use the summit to renew their Ukraine strategy. They will also welcome new UK Prime Minister Rishi Sunak into their midst and discuss wider challenges, including those originating from China.

In this context of uncertainty, Indonesian President Joko Widodo is determined to try to make his mark as host of the event, even though his nation is one of the group’s less-prominent states. He might be helped in this by supportive noises from Chinese President Xi Jinping, who said recently that he and US President Joe Biden, who will attend in the aftermath of the US midterm elections, must find ways to get along better following a longstanding cooling of bilateral ties.

According to Widodo, while Putin might not attend the summit in person, other heads of state will, including those from China, Germany, India, Japan, Australia, Brazil, the UK, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Turkey, France, Italy, Germany, Canada, South Korea, Argentina, Mexico, the EU and the US. Collectively, these powers account for about 90 percent of global gross domestic product, 80 percent of world trade, and 66 percent of the global population.

One high priority for the event is the outlook for the global economy amid growing concerns that key nations, including much of the West, are in or heading for recession. Indonesia’s G20 presidency has formulated six priority agendas that include support for the economy through the difficult period that lies ahead, including dealing with the continuing pandemic and securing future growth in the digital age.

One of the related economic issues that will be discussed is surging energy prices. Following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, energy security has become as important as net-zero emissions for some governments, not least in Europe, and this might be the case not just this year and next but also into the medium term.

This pressing matter, which will also be a key topic for discussion during the world leaders’ gathering at COP27 in Egypt on November 7-8, was highlighted in a major report published on Thursday by the UN, which asserted that there is currently no credible way for the world to deliver on the central goal of Paris: Namely, to limit the average increase in global temperatures to no more than 1.5 C above preindustrial levels.

Hence the compelling need for strong leadership from G20 leaders and bolder statements of intent because, in the words of UN climate change chief Simon Stiell: “We are still nowhere near the scale and pace of emission reductions required to put us on track toward a 1.5 degrees Celsius world. To keep this goal alive, national governments need to strengthen their climate action plans now and implement them in the next eight years.”

Broader global economic-development issues will also be a key feature of the summit, reflecting Indonesia’s status as a key emerging market with the ambition of spurring a more-inclusive global economic order. This will include discussions on sustainability finance, financial inclusion through digital financial inclusion and the development of micro, small and medium enterprises.

All of this highlights why this year’s G20 summit could be one of the most unpredictable. While it could collapse into rancor, there is an outside chance significant agreements could be reached, including for Black Sea grain exports.

Widodo is well aware that in the past decade and a half, while the G20 is widely considered to have seized the mantle from the G7 as the premier forum for international economic cooperation and global governance, it has failed so far to realize the full scale of the ambitions some have thrust upon it.

In part, this is because it has no formal mechanisms to ensure enforcement of agreements by world leaders.

However, the Indonesian presidency will still try to exceed the expectations of what the summit will deliver. Whether it manages to do this will depend significantly on whether Ukraine-driven global divisions ameliorate or grow in the days ahead.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Regno Unito

Johnson congela il canone alla Bbc. I liberal inconsolabili piangono il passato potere.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-01-31.

Cacciata. Raffaello Sanzio. La cacciata di Eliodoro dal Tempio. 001

«The BBC is dead, long live the BBC»

«For years the BBC and its financing model have belonged to that small category of things that make no sense in theory but work well in practice»

«Now that model is imperiled, and the BBC will be forced to abandon its traditional role and find its place in the modern media landscape»

«The U.K. government recently announced that the annual television license fee, the BBC’s main source of funds, will be frozen at 159 pounds ($217) for the next two years, then rise to keep pace with inflation for four years after that»

«More important, the minister in charge added (before colleagues told her to walk it back) that this would be the last such settlement»

«In the short term, the Beeb faces a tighter financial squeeze than the rest of Britain’s public sector»

«Beyond that, if the license fee ends, the very idea of BBC-style public-service broadcasting is in doubt»

«This license fee has always been a conspicuous and seemingly indefensible anomaly»

«Why is a public-sector supplier of news and entertainment needed in the first place?»

«Yes, there’s a good deal of dreck, but the BBC produces much more than its fair share of high-quality television and radio of all kinds — at comparatively modest cost»

«Its output is popular at home and has burnished Britain’s standing in the world. Its coverage of news and current affairs is impartial and authoritative»

«The contrast with public-service broadcasting in the U.S. is stark. It’s not just that American providers are starved of public resources. Relying heavily on private donations pushes NPR and PBS toward programming that will please their comparatively narrow, liberal-minded segment of financial supporters»

«Britain has long had brazenly partisan newspapers — which made the BBC all the more valuable»

«As competition and unbundling intensify, it will continue to lose viewers and the loyalty of the public»

«Sooner or later, the license-fee model will become politically unsustainable, and the formula that delivered this great and improbable public good will unravel»

* * * * * * *

La Bbc è sempre stata la corifea dell’ideologia liberal: i suoi giornalisti sono tutti grembiulino, Marx, fedeli scribi trascrittori delle veline ricevute, ortodossi nel loro credo politico assunto a livello di religione, da praticare ed esportare.

La Bbc si autodefinisce “servizio pubblico” ed “imparziale”.

Imparziale??

Ma nel suo ardore ideologico molto spesso ha travalicato anche i limiti del comune buon senso.

* * *

Clima. Remake di un articolo BBC del 12 dicembre 2007. Non dimenticare.

Bbc. Sembrerebbe essere entrata in una crisi irreversibile. – Bloomberg.

Bbc. La cloaca delle menzogne. Soffre di essere stata smascherata. – Governo Inglese.

BBC’s reputation highly damaged by Diana interview report, says Patel.

Bbc. Bandita dalla Cina perché propala fake news. – Xinhua e Bbc.

China pulls BBC World News off the air for serious content violation

China bans BBC World News from broadcasting

Princess Diana Scandal Is a Genuine Crisis for the BBC

* * *

Lo scandalo della Principessa Diana è frutto di un articolo inventato di sana pianta, così come l’articolo sul ‘clima’ pubblicato il 12 dicembre 2007.

Nulla da stupirsi quindi se la Cina ed altri stati la abbiano messa al bando e l’opinione pubblica la segua solo per essere informata del pensiero attuale dei liberal.

E tutto questo lo faceva a spese del Contribuente.

Vita comoda, ne vero?

* * * * * * *


The BBC Is Dead, Long Live the BBC

For years the BBC and its financing model have belonged to that small category of things that make no sense in theory but work well in practice. Now that model is imperiled, and the BBC will be forced to abandon its traditional role and find its place in the modern media landscape. The country, and the world, will be the poorer for it.

The U.K. government recently announced that the annual television license fee, the BBC’s main source of funds, will be frozen at 159 pounds ($217) for the next two years, then rise to keep pace with inflation for four years after that. More important, the minister in charge added (before colleagues told her to walk it back) that this would be the last such settlement. In the short term, the Beeb faces a tighter financial squeeze than the rest of Britain’s public sector. Beyond that, if the license fee ends, the very idea of BBC-style public-service broadcasting is in doubt.

This license fee has always been a conspicuous and seemingly indefensible anomaly. Why is a public-sector supplier of news and entertainment needed in the first place?  And, if you were going to have one, why on earth pay for it with an annual tax on TVs that demanded the same payment from people regardless of income?

Yet look at the results. Against the odds, given the upheaval in its industry, the Beeb has managed not only to survive but also to prosper. Yes, there’s a good deal of dreck, but the BBC produces much more than its fair share of high-quality television and radio of all kinds — at comparatively modest cost. Its output is popular at home and has burnished Britain’s standing in the world. Its coverage of news and current affairs is impartial and authoritative.

All these features were, and are, of a piece. The license fee separates the BBC from the government in a way that a subvention of ordinary tax revenue wouldn’t. It requires openness and accountability, encouraging tight control of costs, for instance putting downward pressure on what stars can be paid. It cements the obligation to serve all the public, underlining the commitment to political impartiality and reminding the enterprise to make broadly popular programs as well as more sophisticated, educational or otherwise aspirational material. In these ways, it creates a cultural space in which Brits, whether they know it or not, can relate to each other and find they have something in common.

The contrast with public-service broadcasting in the U.S. is stark. It’s not just that American providers are starved of public resources. Relying heavily on private donations pushes NPR and PBS toward programming that will please their comparatively narrow, liberal-minded segment of financial supporters. Public-service broadcasting in the U.S. doesn’t even try to serve the whole public. It serves its niche.

In fact, a true American equivalent of the BBC is virtually unimaginable.  The concept of public service at a distance from partisan politics still has purchase in Britain — think of the career civil service, the judiciary, management of elections, appointments to the central bank, agencies such as the Office for Budget Responsibility and countless other arms-length public agencies and non-government organizations.

In the U.S. the nonpartisan tradition is all but dead. Perhaps the armed services are still mostly above politics. Otherwise, almost every institution that intersects with public policy — not just designing it, but executing, influencing, analyzing and explaining it — is partisan.

Nowhere is this more true than in the media. Britain has long had brazenly partisan newspapers — which made the BBC all the more valuable. In the U.S., esteemed newspapers such as the New York Times and the Washington Post once presumed to play a similar role. (I recall that many years ago I was on a panel with a Times reporter who seemed genuinely offended by my describing his paper as liberal.) Today, those once-authoritative and trusted-to-be-impartial papers have chosen sides. The perfection of the media market, accelerated by social media, favors partisan commitment.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has doubtless turned against the BBC to distract attention from his latest embarrassments. But the Beeb has longer-term problems. As competition and unbundling intensify, it will continue to lose viewers and the loyalty of the public. Sooner or later, the license-fee model will become politically unsustainable, and the formula that delivered this great and improbable public good will unravel.

One can imagine the BBC, in due course, as just another TV and audio production company, bidding for its modest share of public subsidy. Britain, and anywhere else the Beeb can be seen or heard, will never be the same.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Regno Unito

Clima. Remake di un articolo BBC del 12 dicembre 2007. Non dimenticare.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-01-11.

Bbc_news_logo

Nota importante. Sono debitore al sig. Alberto Ricci di avermi ricordato questo articolo.

Lo riportiamo senza commento alcuno, che già si commenta da solo.

* * * * * * *

Bbc. Sembrerebbe essere entrata in una crisi irreversibile. – Bloomberg.

Bbc. La cloaca delle menzogne. Soffre di essere stata smascherata. – Governo Inglese.

BBC’s reputation highly damaged by Diana interview report, says Patel.

Bbc. Bandita dalla Cina perché propala fake news. – Xinhua e Bbc.

China pulls BBC World News off the air for serious content violation

China bans BBC World News from broadcasting

Princess Diana Scandal Is a Genuine Crisis for the BBC

* * * * * * *


BBC. Arctic summers ice-free ‘by 2013’

Scientists in the US have presented one of the most dramatic forecasts yet for the disappearance of Arctic sea ice.

Their latest modelling studies indicate northern polar waters could be ice-free in summers within just 5-6 years.

Professor Wieslaw Maslowski told an American Geophysical Union meeting that previous projections had underestimated the processes now driving ice loss.

Summer melting this year reduced the ice cover to 4.13 million sq km, the smallest ever extent in modern times.

Remarkably, this stunning low point was not even incorporated into the model runs of Professor Maslowski and his team, which used data sets from 1979 to 2004 to constrain their future projections.

“Our projection of 2013 for the removal of ice in summer is not accounting for the last two minima, in 2005 and 2007,” the researcher from the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, explained to the BBC.

“So given that fact, you can argue that may be our projection of 2013 is already too conservative.”

                         Real world

Using supercomputers to crunch through possible future outcomes has become a standard part of climate science in recent years.

Professor Maslowski’s group, which includes co-workers at Nasa and the Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS), is well known for producing modelled dates that are in advance of other teams.

These other teams have variously produced dates for an open summer ocean that, broadly speaking, go out from about 2040 to 2100.

But the Monterey researcher believes these models have seriously underestimated some key melting processes. In particular, Professor Maslowski is adamant that models need to incorporate more realistic representations of the way warm water is moving into the Arctic basin from the Pacific and Atlantic oceans.

“My claim is that the global climate models underestimate the amount of heat delivered to the sea ice by oceanic advection,” Professor Maslowski said.

“The reason is that their low spatial resolution actually limits them from seeing important detailed factors.

“We use a high-resolution regional model for the Arctic Ocean and sea ice forced with realistic atmospheric data. This way, we get much more realistic forcing, from above by the atmosphere and from the bottom by the ocean.”

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the UN-led body which assesses the state of the Earth’s climate system, uses an averaged group of models to forecast ice loss in the Arctic.

But it is has become apparent in recent years that the real, observed rate of summer ice melting is now starting to run well ahead of the models.

The minimum ice extent reached in September 2007 shattered the previous record for ice withdrawal set in 2005, of 5.32 million square km.

The long-term average minimum, based on data from 1979 to 2000, is 6.74 million square km. In comparison, 2007 was lower by 2.61 million square km, an area approximately equal to the size of Alaska and Texas combined, or the size of 10 United Kingdoms.

                         Diminishing returns

Professor Peter Wadhams from Cambridge University, UK, is an expert on Arctic ice. He has used sonar data collected by Royal Navy submarines to show that the volume loss is outstripping even area withdrawal, which is in agreement with the model result of Professor Maslowski.

“Some models have not been taking proper account of the physical processes that go on,” he commented.

“The ice is thinning faster than it is shrinking; and some modellers have been assuming the ice was a rather thick slab.

“Wieslaw’s model is more efficient because it works with data and it takes account of processes that happen internally in the ice.”

He cited the ice-albedo feedback effect in which open water receives more solar radiation, which in turn leads to additional warming and further melting.

Professor Wadhams said the Arctic was now being set up for further ice loss in the coming years.

“The implication is that this is not a cycle, not just a fluctuation. The loss this year will precondition the ice for the same thing to happen again next year, only worse.

“There will be even more opening up, even more absorption and even more melting.

“In the end, it will just melt away quite suddenly. It might not be as early as 2013 but it will be soon, much earlier than 2040.”

The US National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) collects the observational data on the extent of Arctic sea ice, delivering regular status bulletins. Its research scientist Dr Mark Serreze was asked to give one of the main lectures here at this year’s AGU Fall Meeting.

Discussing the possibility for an open Arctic ocean in summer months, he told the meeting: “A few years ago, even I was thinking 2050, 2070, out beyond the year 2100, because that’s what our models were telling us. But as we’ve seen, the models aren’t fast enough right now; we are losing ice at a much more rapid rate.

“My thinking on this is that 2030 is not an unreasonable date to be thinking of.”

And later, to the BBC, Dr Serreze added: “I think Wieslaw is probably a little aggressive in his projections, simply because the luck of the draw means natural variability can kick in to give you a few years in which the ice loss is a little less than you’ve had in previous years. But Wieslaw is a smart guy and it would not surprise me if his projections came out.”

Former US Vice President Al Gore cited Professor Maslowski’s analysis on Monday in his acceptance speech at the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony in Oslo.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Regno Unito

Gran Bretagna. Prima tra i G7, la Banca Centrale alza gli interessi.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-12-17.

Johnson Boris - Improta 001

                         In sintesi.

– BoE surprises with rate hike to 0.25%

– ECB cuts stimulus but maintains support

– BOJ set for policy decision on Friday

– Britain became the first G7 economy to hike interest rates

* * * * * * *

Come tutti i sistemi economici dell’enclave liberal socialista europea il problema più preoccupante è la inflazione.

Tutti gli investimenti che rendessero meno del livello inflattivo sarebbero in perdita netta.

Sospendere i QE è già cosa buona, ma senza rialzo dei tassi di interesse questa stagflazione continuerà a mietere vittime, falcidiando il risparmio ed imponendo rialzi dei prezzi al consumo, in primis degli alimentari.

Qui a seguito riportiamo alcuni dei principali macrodati inglesi: sono sconfortanti. Gli altri sono ben peggio. L’aumento dello 0.25% è come curare un addome acuto con una mezza compressa di aspirina.

2021-12-17__ Gran Bretagna 001

2021-12-17__ Gran Bretagna 002

2021-12-17__ Gran Bretagna 003

2021-12-17__ Gran Bretagna 004

Ripetiamo solo per chiarezza.

Con l’inflazione al 14.3% un aumento dello 0.25% fa tenerezza: è solo una pia illusione. Oppio ai popoli.

* * * * * * *

Bank of England raises interests, diverging from other central banks.

– BoE surprises with rate hike to 0.25%

– ECB cuts stimulus but maintains support

– BOJ set for policy decision on Friday

* * * * * * *

Dec 16 (Reuters) – Britain became the first G7 economy to hike interest rates since the onset of the pandemic on Thursday, with the U.S. Federal Reserve also signalling plans to tighten in 2022 but the European Central Bank only slightly reining in stimulus.

The different paths taken by major central banks underline deep uncertainties about how the fast-spreading Omicron variant will hit the global economy and their differing views on an inflation surge that is landing hard in the United States and Britain, but less so in Europe and less again in Japan.

While the risk of uncontrolled prices has taken precedent for the Fed and the Bank of England, European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde emphasised in a news conference that the pandemic was again depressing spending in the euro zone and threatening growth.

“To cope with the current pandemic wave some countries have introduced tighter containment measures … This could delay the recovery … The pandemic is weighing on consumer and business confidence,” Lagarde said.

In that environment, “we need to maintain flexibility and optionality” by withdrawing support “step by step”, but not committing to a full exit from pandemic support programmes, she added.

The Fed, by contrast, committed on Wednesday to end its pandemic bond-buying by March and laid out an accelerated timetable for interest rate increases.

Fed Chair Jerome Powell said the United States was heading in 2022 towards strong growth and full employment — a far-off prospect for most European labour markets — and that the Fed needed to treat inflation as the more pressing risk.

Bank of England policymakers raised the benchmark Bank Rate on Thursday to 0.25% from 0.1%, confounding economists’ expectations that it would stay on hold. The BoE said inflation was set to hit 6% in April, three times the BoE’s target level.

“The Committee continues to judge that there are two-sided risks around the inflation outlook in the medium term, but that some modest tightening of monetary policy over the forecast period is likely to be necessary to meet the 2% inflation target sustainably,” the UK central bank said.

UK daily coronavirus infections are at their highest since the earliest days of the pandemic, forcing Prime Minister Boris Johnson this week to impose new restrictions.

A first read-out of the UK Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) for December on Thursday showed Omicron had already hit British hospitality and travel firms – a day after data showed consumer price inflation at a decade-high.

The ECB, which has undershot its inflation target for most of the past decade, kept interest rates on hold and announced the end of its pandemic emergency asset-buying scheme next March.

But the euro zone central bank also promised copious support as needed via its long-running Asset Purchase Programme, confirmed its relaxed view on inflation, and signalled that any exit from years of ultra-easy policy will be slow.  

“The Governing Council judges that the progress on economic recovery and towards its medium-term inflation target permits a step-by-step reduction in the pace of its asset purchases over the coming quarters,” it said in a statement.

The Bank of Japan is due to announce its policy on Friday. With consumer-level inflation remaining largely absent, only a slight reduction in corporate asset purchases is under discussion at its meeting.

                         MAXIMUM EMPLOYMENT.

The Fed on Wednesday doubled the pace at which it will cut bond purchases, while forecasts from its policymakers signalled as many as three interest rate increases next year.  

“The economy no longer needs increasing amounts of policy support,” Powell told a news conference. “In my view, we are making rapid progress toward maximum employment.”

Even if the others are not hard on its heels, Powell and the Fed appear to have set the agenda for a tumultuous 2022 as central bankers chart their paths to the exit, albeit at dramatically different paces.

“You saw it in his congressional remarks that were more about tightening sooner than it was about worrying about the health of the global economy,” said Vincent Reinhart, chief economist for Dreyfus & Mellon.

Norway’s central bank, which had hiked in September on the back of an economic rebound, went ahead with a further rise as expected and said more were likely to follow.  

Earlier on Thursday, the Swiss National Bank kept its ultra-loose stance in place with a policy rate locked in at -0.75%. Swiss inflation – while rising – is still seen much lower than elsewhere at just 1% next year, falling to 0.6% in 2023.

“The SNB is maintaining its expansionary monetary policy,” it said in a statement. “It is thus ensuring price stability and supporting the Swiss economy in its recovery from the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.”

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Economia e Produzione Industriale

Blocco Europeo. Oct21. Immatricolazioni auto a picco. Default in vista – Acea.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-11-19.

2021-11-20__ Blocco Europeo Immatricolazioni 001

La Acea, Associazione europea dei costruttori di automobili, ha rilasciato il consueto report mensile sul numero delle immatricolazioni delle automobili nel blocco europeo.

Questo macrodato risulta essere particolarmente attendibile perché è una semplice conta, che non è trattata da algoritmo alcuno. Per questo motivo è un indicatore particolarmente robusto dello stato economico di una nazione.

Si tenga anche presente che il numero delle immatricolazioni corrisponde, grosso modo, al volume della produzione automobilistica.

* * * * * * *

Alcuni gli elementi da considerare.

In primo luogo, le immatricolazioni automobili sono crollate in tutti i grandi stati del blocco europeo. La crisi del settore è dunque un fenomeno continentale, di competenza dell’Unione Europea.

In secondo luogo, si osservi la profondità del crollo: dal -24.6% del Regno Unito fino al -35.7% dell’Italia.

In terzo luogo, tranne che per il Regno Unito, Francia, Germania ed Italia registrano peggioramenti di quasi dieci punti percentuali rispetto a quelli del mese precedente.

In quarto luogo, si consideri come questi cali delle immatricolazioni generino contrazioni della produzione, da cui ridimensionamento degli addetti e calo del gettito fiscale.

In quinto luogo, da ultimo ma non certo per ultimo, al di sotto di un certo volume di vendite la produzione automobilistica va in perdita, diventando quindi non sostenibile.

* * * * * * *

Mercedes-Benz fa fagotto e si trasferisce in Cina, che chiama ‘nuova Patria’

La situazione attuale è particolarmente severa.

Nella eurozona l’indice dei prezzi alla produzione è stimato essere aumentato del +16.0% anno su anno. E questo costituisce una ulteriore penalizzazione dell’industria automobilistica.

Per la sola Germania, inoltre, l’Indice dei prezzi all’Importazione è salito ad ottobre del +17.7%.

In conclusione, per il settore automobilistico si avvicina rapidamente il momento in cui dovrà uscire dal mercato.

Pubblicato in: Economia e Produzione Industriale, Materie Prime, Problemia Energetici, Regno Unito

Regno Unito. Johnson deve scegliere tra ideologia green oppure autosufficienza energetica.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-10-21.

2021-10-20__ Johnson 001

Nota.

Ad articolo finito, è comparso questo articolo:

Net zero announcement: UK sets out plans to cut greenhouse gas emissions

Non indica però con chiarezza quale comportamento terrà il Regno Unito sullo sfruttamento dei nuovi campo di gas naturale.

* * * * * * *

«Britain has pledged to hit net zero emissions by 2050»

«Energy firms say new output can be part of phased decline»

«Activists want halt to new exploration immediately»

«Supply crunch sent global oil, gas prices soaring»

«Britain faces a fossil fuel dilemma: it can burnish its green credentials by halting new oil and gas development in the North Sea, yet doing so will leave it more reliant on imported fuel»

«How Britain charts a course to achieve net zero emissions by 2050 will be under scrutiny when it hosts the COP26 climate conference in Glasgow, Scotland, starting on Oct. 31»

«Vorlich oilfield. Neither legislation nor activism halted the development»

«If supply goes away and demand doesn’t change, that only has one consequence and that is an escalation in price rises»

«The challenge caused by shrinking domestic production and rising fuel imports has been felt across Europe. The European wholesale gas price is up more than 350% this year»

«Britain, which could once depend on its own fields for oil and gas to fire up its power stations, fuel its cars and heat its homes, has been a net energy importer since 2005»

«→→ It is the world’s biggest offshore wind power producer – and is expanding this resource rapidly. But that doesn’t power homes on windless days ←←»

«The purity of the (IEA) report is excellent, but the reality in practice for countries is about ensuring security of supply»

«Making the most of indigenous resources helps meet UK demand and contain price growth, providing secure supplies»

«In one case, Greenpeace sought to have a BP gas field licence scrapped over its emissions via a Scottish court – although the action failed»

«In another case, it is seeking to halt development of the Cambo field off the Shetland Isles, a field part owned by Royal Dutch Shell»

* * * * * * *

Il problema è chiaro e semplice.

Il Regno Unito ha ancora nel Mare del Nord molti campi di natural gas lo sfruttamento dei quali concorrerebbe notevolmente a ridurre la bolletta energetica, garantendo nel contempo un costante approvvigionamento svincolato dagli accadimenti esterni.

Si starà a vedere se nel Regno Unito comanda il governo legalmente eletto do Mr Boris Johnson oppure Greenpeace e le varie ngo di contorno.

* * * * * * *


Britain’s fossil fuel dilemma in the spotlight as climate talks near.

– Britain has pledged to hit net zero emissions by 2050

– Energy firms say new output can be part of phased decline

– Activists want halt to new exploration immediately

– Supply crunch sent global oil, gas prices soaring

*

London, Oct 19 (Reuters) – Britain faces a fossil fuel dilemma: it can burnish its green credentials by halting new oil and gas development in the North Sea, yet doing so will leave it more reliant on imported fuel.

How Britain charts a course to achieve net zero emissions by 2050 will be under scrutiny when it hosts the COP26 climate conference in Glasgow, Scotland, starting on Oct. 31.

Navigating that route has already proved challenging.

In June 2019, when Britain enshrined its 2050 net zero target in law, Greenpeace activists steered speedboats towards a BP platform in the North Sea brandishing a “Climate Emergency” banner to try to stop production starting from Vorlich oilfield.

Neither legislation nor activism halted the development. Production from Vorlich started in November 2020.

Oil majors say new production can play a role in managing decline, while campaigners are pressing for an immediate halt to new projects with publicity stunts and legal action.

The government, meanwhile, needs to keep the nation’s lights on as it smoothes over volatile energy markets and juggles competing demands over how to achieve its climate goals.

“If supply goes away and demand doesn’t change, that only has one consequence and that is an escalation in price rises,” BP Chief Executive Bernard Looney said this month.

Britain and other European states have already felt this acutely. Brent crude , a benchmark based on North Sea barrels, is up more than 60% this year, while the price of UK benchmark wholesale gas has risen more than 250%.

The challenge caused by shrinking domestic production and rising fuel imports has been felt across Europe. The European wholesale gas price is up more than 350% this year.

Britain, which could once depend on its own fields for oil and gas to fire up its power stations, fuel its cars and heat its homes, has been a net energy importer since 2005 as output from the North Sea has dwindled.

With the capacity of its gas storage facilities now only enough to last the nation a few days, Britain’s reliance on just-in-time supplies shipped in from Qatar or elsewhere leave it exposed when the market tightens, like now with the surge in demand as economies recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.

                         PRESSURE TO ACT

For activists, the answer is not turning the taps back on but rather reducing domestic fossil fuel consumption.

“We’re calling on Boris Johnson to stop pushing through new oil and gas projects,” said Greenpeace activist Philip Evans, addressing the British prime minister who has been pressing other countries to deepen climate commitments before COP26.

“If the government is worried about keeping the lights on there are things they can be doing to reduce demand,” Evans said, including improvements to home insulation, cleaner public transport and more investment in renewable power generation.

Around 70 scientists and academics sent an open letter published in Britain’s Independent newspaper this week calling on Johnson to stop allowing investment and licensing for new oil and gas fields, saying that “now is the time for bold political action”.

Britain has made progress in some areas. It is the world’s biggest offshore wind power producer – and is expanding this resource rapidly. But that doesn’t power homes on windless days.

Yet, there is rising pressure to act faster to curb fossil fuel use. The International Energy Agency said in a report the world must halt new oil and gas projects to achieve the 2015 Paris climate summit targets that aim to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius by 2050 compared with pre-industrial levels.

“The purity of the (IEA) report is excellent, but the reality in practice for countries is about ensuring security of supply,” Anne-Marie Trevelyan told Reuters in June when she was still British minister of state for energy and clean growth.

Britain has not committed to ending North Sea exploration, taking a similar approach to Norway but not Denmark, another North Sea producer, which has halted new projects.

Britain has, however, been managing a decline, with production now half its 1999 peak at about 1 million barrels of oil equivalent per day (boepd), or about 1% of global oil demand.

                         SUPPLY SECURITY

Oil and Gas UK (OGUK), an industry association, has committed to making the North Sea an operationally net zero basin by 2050, which means it aims to eliminate, capture or offset any residual emissions from producing oil and gas there.

It said in September that domestic production was cheaper and cleaner than imported gas, given shipping fuel creates emissions and because some other producing nations have poor environmental records.

“Making the most of indigenous resources helps meet UK demand and contain price growth, providing secure supplies with a lower carbon footprint than imports offer,” OGUK said.

Britain’s Oil and Gas Authority said gas extracted from the British North Sea had an average emission intensity of 22 kg carbon dioxide equivalent per barrel of oil equivalent, while imported LNG had an average intensity of 59 kg.

Yet, Greenpeace and other activists say these arguments miss the point: using fossil fuels must stop rather than simply trying to make using them cleaner.

To push for swifter action, they have taken campaigning to the courts.

In one case, Greenpeace sought to have a BP gas field licence scrapped over its emissions via a Scottish court – although the action failed.

In another case, it is seeking to halt development of the Cambo field off the Shetland Isles, a field part owned by Royal Dutch Shell.

“We’ve delivered a 12-foot oil-stained statue of Boris Johnson right to the gates of Downing Street calling him out as a monumental climate failure,” said Greenpeace’s Evans. “They can expect to see a lot more of Greenpeace in the court room.”

Pubblicato in: Economia e Produzione Industriale, Problemia Energetici, Regno Unito

North Sea Link. Un capolavoro ingegneristico che trasferisce corrente tra UK e Norvegia.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-10-09.

2021-10-06__ Norvegia 000

«North Sea Link. The world’s longest subsea interconnector linking the UK and Norway.

North Sea Link is a 720 kilometre subsea interconnector linking the electricity systems of the UK and Norway.

The 1400 megawatt interconnector stretches from Blyth in the UK, across the North Sea, to Kvilldal in Norway.

By enabling the sharing of renewable energy between the two countries, North Sea Link delivers offers consumers at both ends access to cleaner and more secure energy.

Linking Nordic and British energy markets will bring a number of benefits, including:

– Providing opportunities for shared use of renewable energy – helping both countries to meet domestic and international renewable and climate change targets.

– Increasing the security of electricity supplies for both countries.

– Providing additional transmission capacity for electricity to be traded between both countries, supporting economic growth in Norway and the UK.» [North Sea Link]

* * * * * * *

«The world’s longest under-sea electricity cable, transferring green power between Norway and the UK, has begun operation»

«The 450-mile (725km) cable connects Blyth in Northumberland with the Norwegian village of Kvilldal»

«At full 1,400 megawatt capacity it will import enough hydro-power to supply 1.4 million homes»

«remarkable feat of engineering»

«It has four other power cables running to Belgium, France and the Netherlands»

«Hydropower in Norway and wind power in the UK are subject to weather conditions and fluctuations in demand»

«North Sea Link (NSL) is also a great example of two countries working together»

«power can be exported from the UK when wind generation is high and electricity demand low, or be imported from Norway when demand is high and wind generation low»

* * * * * * *

La North Sea Link è riuscita a risolvere molteplici problemi tecnici di ardua soluzione, che aprono la strada alle interconnessioni su lunghe distanze pur contenendo le dispersioni entro limiti accettabili ed economicamente remunerativi.

* * * * * * *


Full power ahead for UK to Norway under-sea power cable.

The world’s longest under-sea electricity cable, transferring green power between Norway and the UK, has begun operation.

The 450-mile (725km) cable connects Blyth in Northumberland with the Norwegian village of Kvilldal.

At full 1,400 megawatt capacity it will import enough hydro-power to supply 1.4 million homes, National Grid said.

National Grid Ventures president Cordi O’Hara said it was a “remarkable feat of engineering”.

He added: “We had to go through mountains, fjords and across the North Sea to make this happen.

“North Sea Link (NSL) is also a great example of two countries working together to maximise their renewable energy resources for mutual benefit.”

National Grid said the €1.6bn (£1.37bn) joint venture with Norwegian power operator Statnett would help the UK reduce carbon emissions by 23 million tonnes by 2030.

It has four other power cables running to Belgium, France and the Netherlands and said 90% of energy imported in this way would be from zero carbon sources by 2030.

Hydropower in Norway and wind power in the UK are subject to weather conditions and fluctuations in demand.

Using NSL, renewable power can be exported from the UK when wind generation is high and electricity demand low, or be imported from Norway when demand is high and wind generation low.

Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy minister Greg Hands said NSL enabled both countries to “benefit from the flexibility and energy security that interconnectors provide”.

He added: “This pioneering partnership shows first-hand how crucial international cooperation will be in helping us to deliver on our net zero ambitions.”

Pubblicato in: Agricoltura, Devoluzione socialismo, Economia e Produzione Industriale, Materie Prime, Regno Unito

Regno Unito. I prezzi della anidride carbonica salgono del 500%. Impatto generalizzato.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-09-27.

CO2 001

La anidride carbonica (CO2) è materia prima nella filiera alimentare, in quella dei fertilizzanti, e negli allevamenti di pollame e maiali. Serve, per esempio, per gasificare acqua e birra, oppure quale anestetico prima della macelleria di pollame e suini.

Il Governo inglese ha avvisato gli utilizzatori industriali che vi saranno aumenti dei prezzi del 500%, a seguito della impennata del costo anno su anno del gas naturale, un po’ più del 250%.

Il Governo inglese ha anche provveduto a finanziare le industrie produttrici, che avevano cessato la produzione a causa delle elevate perdite.

* * * * * * *

«CO2 prices will rise sharply, minister says»

«UK pays fertiliser maker CF to reopen plants»

«Poultry plants would have closed, Britain says»

«Britain warned its food producers to prepare for a 500% rise in carbon dioxide prices on Wednesday after extending emergency state support to avert a shortage of poultry and meat triggered by soaring costs of wholesale natural gas»

«Natural gas prices have spiked this year as economies reopened from COVID-19 lockdowns and high demand for liquefied natural gas in Asia pushed down supplies to Europe, sending shockwaves through industries reliant on natural gas»

«Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a by-product of the fertilizer industry where natural gas is the biggest input cost»

«This has forced some plants to shut in recent weeks, leading to a shortage of the gas used to put the fizz into beer and sodas and stun poultry and pigs before slaughter»

«Britain struck a deal with U.S. company CF Industries to restart production at two plants which were shut because they had become unprofitable»

«the food industry knows there’s going to be a sharp rise in the cost»

«which highlights the severity of the distortions that the spike in European natural gas prices have wrought»

«Yara, the world’s largest trader of ammonia, is bringing supplies to Europe from facilities in Trinidad, the United States and Australia to support fertilizer capacity after wholesale gas prices surged»

* * * * * * *

Come si constata, i vertiginosi aumenti dei wholesale gas prices stanno iniziando a svolgere il loro effetto inflattivo, e non si vede fine a questa inflazione.

* * * * * * *


Britain tells its food industry to prepare for CO2 price shock.

– CO2 prices will rise sharply, minister says

– UK pays fertiliser maker CF to reopen plants

– Poultry plants would have closed, Britain says

*

London, Sept 22 (Reuters) – Britain warned its food producers to prepare for a 500% rise in carbon dioxide prices on Wednesday after extending emergency state support to avert a shortage of poultry and meat triggered by soaring costs of wholesale natural gas.

Natural gas prices have spiked this year as economies reopened from COVID-19 lockdowns and high demand for liquefied natural gas in Asia pushed down supplies to Europe, sending shockwaves through industries reliant on natural gas.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a by-product of the fertilizer industry where natural gas is the biggest input cost.

This has forced some plants to shut in recent weeks, leading to a shortage of the gas used to put the fizz into beer and sodas and stun poultry and pigs before slaughter.

As CO2 stocks dwindled, Britain struck a deal with U.S. company CF Industries to restart production at two plants which were shut because they had become unprofitable.

“We need the market to adjust, the food industry knows there’s going to be a sharp rise in the cost of carbon dioxide,” Environment Secretary George Eustice told Sky News.

It would have to accept that the price of CO2 would rise sharply, to around 1,000 pounds ($1,365) a tonne from 200 pounds a tonne, Eustice said, adding: “So a big, sharp rise.”

The three-week support for CF, which supplies some 60% of Britain’s CO2, would cost “many millions, possibly tens of millions but it’s to underpin some of those fixed costs,” Eustice said.

The government gave few details about the deal to take on some of the fixed costs of CF, which based in the Chicago suburb of Deerfield, which highlights the severity of the distortions that the spike in European natural gas prices have wrought.

It was not immediately clear how the state intervention by one of Europe’s most traditionally laissez-faire governments would affect the price of fertilizer – another key cost for food producers – and whether or not it would stoke demands from other energy-heavy industries for similar state support.

                         FOOD CRUNCH?

British ministers including Prime Minister Boris Johnson have repeatedly brushed aside suggestions there could be a shortage of traditional Christmas fare such as roast turkey, though some suppliers have warned of one.

Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng, who also serves as energy minister, has said there would be no return to the 1970s when Britain was plagued by power cuts that made the economy the ‘sick man of Europe’, with three-day working weeks and people unable to heat their homes.

But Eustice said some of Britain’s meat and poultry processors would have run out of CO2 within days.

“We know that if we did not act, then by this weekend or certainly by the early part of next week, some of the poultry processing plants would need to close,” he added.

“And then we would have animal welfare issues, because you’d have lots of chickens on farms that couldn’t be slaughtered on time, and would have to be probably euthanized on farms, we’d have a similar situation with pigs.”

He said the impact on food prices would be negligible.

Yara, the world’s largest trader of ammonia, is bringing supplies to Europe from facilities in Trinidad, the United States and Australia to support fertilizer capacity after wholesale gas prices surged, its CEO said.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Economia e Produzione Industriale

Market Mover della settimana 24/9 – 01/10. È ricca di eventi.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-09-26.

gatto_001__

Market mover della settimana: tutti i dati economici in arrivo.

                         Market mover lunedì 27 settembre

03:30, CNY: Profitti industriali degli ultimi 12 mesi Cina

10:00, EUR: Saldo della bilancia commerciale non-UE Italia

14:30, USD: Principali ordinativi di beni durevoli USA

                         Market mover martedì 28 settembre

01:50, JPY: Verbali della riunione sulla politica monetaria Giappone

08:00, EUR: Rapporto della GfK sul clima fra i consumatori Germania

16:00, USD: Rapporto sulla fiducia dei consumatori USA

22:30, USD: Scorte settimanali di petrolio USA

                         Market mover mercoledì 29 settembre

10:00, EUR: IPP Italia

16:30, USD: Scorte di petrolio greggio USA

                         Market mover giovedì 30 settembre

01:50, JPY: Produzione industriale preliminare Giappone

03:00, CNY: Indice dei direttori agli acquisti del settore manifatturiero Cina

08:00, GBP: PIL Regno Unito

08:00, GBP: Indice nazionale dei prezzi delle case regno Unito

08:00, EUR: Tasso di disoccupazione Germania

10:00, EUR: Tasso mensile di disoccupazione Italia

11:00, EUR: IPC Italia

11:00, EUR: Tasso di disoccupazione Europa

14:00, EUR: IPC preliminare in Germania

14:30, USD: PIL USA

14:30, USD: Richieste iniziali di sussidi di disoccupazione USA

                         Market mover venerdì 1 ottobre

01:50, JPY: Indice Tankan dei grandi produttori manifatturieri Giappone

08:00, EUR: Vendite al dettaglio in Germania

09:45, EUR: Indice dei direttori degli acquisti del settore manifatturiero Italia

09:55, EUR: Indice dei direttori degli acquisti del settore manifatturiero Germania

10:00, EUR: Indice PMI manifatturiero Eurozona

11:00, EUR: IPC preliminare Eurozona

14:30, USD: Indice prezzi spese personali principali USA

16:00, USD: Indice ISM dell’occupazione manifatturiera USA

16:00, USD: Indice ISM dei direttori agli acquisti del settore manifatturiero USA

Pubblicato in: Armamenti, Cina, Regno Unito, Stati Uniti

Aukus. Gli (ex) alleati in rivolta. Ma Australia e Regno Unito si fidano di Biden.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-09-20.

2021-09-19__ Sottomarini atomici 001

Con il trattato Aukus Regno Unito e Stati Uniti doteranno l’Australia di sei sottomarini atomici.

L’annuncio è stato dato senza nessuna preventiva consultazione con quelli che fino a ieri erano stati considerati essere degli alleati, che hanno reagito inveleniti di essere stati scaricati come stracci vecchi.

Ma il fatto davvero stupefacente è che sia il Regno Unito sia l’Australia si fidino della parola data dagli Stati Uniti. Della parola data da Joe Biden,

Ma come adesso gli Stati Uniti hanno escluso gli ex alleati financo da una consultazione, sembrerebbe verosimile che un domani si comportino in egual modo con Regno Unito e con l’Australia.

Nessuno può dimenticare la débâcle di Joe Biden in Afghanistan e quello che ne è seguito.

Nota.

Usualmente un sottomarino nucleare porta sedici missili balistici, ciascuno dei quali è armato con dieci testate atomiche indipendenti: teoricamente potrebbe distruggere centosessanta obiettivi nemici. Si dia per scontato che la metà sia bloccata in quota dalla difesa aerea avversaria, restano pur sempre settantacinque testate messe a segno.

* * * * * * *

«The US and UK are facing growing international criticism over a new security pact signed with Australia»

«The deal – seen as an effort to counter China – will see the US and UK give Australia the technology to build nuclear-powered submarines»

«But the move angered France, which said it had been “stabbed in the back”, while China accused the three powers of having a “Cold War mentality”»

«And the pact has raised fears that it could provoke China into a war»

«The alliance, known as Aukus, was announced by US President Joe Biden, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his Australian counterpart Scott Morrison on Wednesday»

«Mr Johnson later told MPs that the agreement was “not intended to be adversarial” to China»

«the deal could lead to Britain being dragged into war with China»

«Meanwhile Washington has sought to quell anger in Paris at the pact, which has scuppered a multibillion-dollar submarine deal France had signed with Australia»

«France’s Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian called the announcement a “stab in the back”. He called it a “brutal, unilateral and unpredictable decision”»

«The US knew that this contract and this strategic contract were essential French national interests, and the US didn’t care»

«The pact, which will also see the allies share cyber capabilities, artificial intelligence and other undersea technologies, was described as showing “profound strategic shifts”»

«China, meanwhile, has accused the allies of having a “Cold War mentality” that would hurt their own interests»

«The Chinese state-run Global Times warned of an arms race for nuclear submarines, adding that Australian soldiers were likely to be the “first to die” in a Chinese “counterattack”»

* * * * * * *

Ma adesso, come poi se ce ne fosse stato bisogno, nessuno ‘alleato’ degli Stati Uniti si potrà sentire tutelato.

Arabia Saudita. Biden ritira i missili Patriot, lasciandola indifesa. È inaffidabile.

E l’Arabia Saudita è solo l’ultima della lista ad essere stata pugnalata alle spalle.

*


Aukus: US and UK face backlash over Australia defence deal

The US and UK are facing growing international criticism over a new security pact signed with Australia.

The deal – seen as an effort to counter China – will see the US and UK give Australia the technology to build nuclear-powered submarines.

But the move angered France, which said it had been “stabbed in the back”, while China accused the three powers of having a “Cold War mentality”.

And the pact has raised fears that it could provoke China into a war.

The alliance, known as Aukus, was announced by US President Joe Biden, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his Australian counterpart Scott Morrison on Wednesday.

While they did not mention China, Aukus is being widely viewed as an effort to counter Beijing’s influence in the contested South China Sea.

Mr Johnson later told MPs that the agreement was “not intended to be adversarial” to China.

But the prime minister was questioned by his predecessor, Theresa May, about whether the deal could lead to Britain being dragged into war with China.

She asked the prime minister about the “implications” of the partnership in the event of a Chinese invasion of Taiwan.

Mr Johnson replied: “The United Kingdom remains determined to defend international law and that is the strong advice we would give to our friends across the world, and the strong advice that we would give to the government in Beijing.”

Democratic Taiwan sees itself as a sovereign state, but Beijing has increased pressure on the island which it views as a breakaway province.

                         ‘A very low moment’

Meanwhile Washington has sought to quell anger in Paris at the pact, which has scuppered a multibillion-dollar submarine deal France had signed with Australia.

France’s Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian called the announcement a “stab in the back”.

He called it a “brutal, unilateral and unpredictable decision” that reminded him of former US President Donald Trump.

French diplomats in Washington cancelled a gala to celebrate ties between the US and France in retaliation.

“It’s a very low moment,” France’s former ambassador to the US, Gérard Araud, told the BBC’s World Tonight programme. “The US knew that this contract and this strategic contract were essential French national interests, and the US didn’t care.”

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken called France “a vital partner” and said Washington would still work “incredibly closely” with Paris.

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki shrugged off the French criticisms.

“There are a range of partnerships that include the French and some partnerships that don’t, and they have partnerships with other countries that don’t include us,” she said. “That is part of how global diplomacy works.”

                         ‘Profound strategic shift’

The pact, which will also see the allies share cyber capabilities, artificial intelligence and other undersea technologies, was described as showing “profound strategic shifts” by the UK’s national security adviser Stephen Lovegrove.

It means Australia will become just the seventh nation in the world to operate nuclear-powered submarines.

Mr Lovegrove said the pact was “perhaps the most significant capability collaboration in the world anywhere in the past six decades”.

China, meanwhile, has accused the allies of having a “Cold War mentality” that would hurt their own interests.

The Chinese state-run Global Times warned of an arms race for nuclear submarines, adding that Australian soldiers were likely to be the “first to die” in a Chinese “counterattack”.

And on Friday, China’s President Xi Jinping said foreign powers should not be allowed to interfere in the country’s affairs.

“The future of our country’s development and progress should lie firmly in our own hands,” he said, according to state media.

But Australia’s defence minister, Peter Dutton, brushed aside Beijing’s reaction.

The year when Australia and China hit ‘lowest ebb’

“This is not the first time that we’ve seen different outbursts from China in terms of Australia’s position,” he said.

“We are a proud democracy in our region. We stand with our neighbours in the Indo-Pacific to ensure enduring peace, and this collaboration makes it a safer region. That’s the reality and no amount of propaganda can dismiss the facts.”

Meanwhile, China applied to join a key Asia-Pacific trade pact on Thursday as it attempts to strengthen its position in the region.

The country’s foreign ministry, however, denied that the move to join the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) was a response to the UK-US-Australia pact.

Joining the CPTPP, which was signed in 2018 by 11 countries including Australia and Japan, would mark a significant boost to China’s trading power.