Pubblicato in: Demografia, Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Finlandia. È iniziata la fine del welfare finlandese.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-05-26.

Scandinavia 001

Il paese è uscito ancor più diviso di prima dalle elezioni del 14 aprile.

I socialdemocratici hanno ottenuto il 17.7% dei voti e 40 / 200 seggi, il partito dei finlandesi il 17.5% con 39 seggi, rispetto ai 17 ottenuti alle precedenti elezioni. I restanti voti sono sparsi su altri sette partiti.

I governi di coalizione sono la norma, ma come tutti gli esecutivi di tal fatta hanno vita grama e difficile: di norma non hanno la forza per affrontare di petto le situazioni, che quindi languiscono irrisolte.

*

Nella campagna elettorale si è parlato molto di tutto ciò che era irrilevante.

Il vero problema sul tavolino consiste nel fatto che la popolazione autoctona sta decrescendo rapidamente cui consegue la impossibilità di mantenere il livello del welfare. Nessun allarmismo immediato, ma la Finlandia ha imboccato un vicolo cieco che alla fine porta al collasso del sistema economico.

Gli unici ad aver correttamente inquadrato la reale situazione finlandese sono i russi di Mr Putin, che stanno pazientemente aspettando che spopolamento e crisi economica inneschino il movente per un intervento militare. Le mire russe sulla Scandinavia datano da Pietro il Grande.

* * * * * * *

«Since 2010, the Finnish total fertility rate has plummeted from its comparable low level of 1,87, to an all-time rock bottom of 1,41 in 2018,3) and there is no reason to assume that the trend will be reversed. Finland was hit quite badly by the financial crisis, and its economy really started to recover only in 2015,4) which can be seen as one major cause behind the low number of births. There has been some talk about the low fertility rate in the Finnish media in the recent years. However, there has been little political action to alleviate the situation. And, truth be told, the political actions to boost the fertility seem to be doomed anyway»

*

«In Finland, there is a large and growing elderly population, but the number of tax payers is not increasing, but actually decreasing.6) The much-touted panacea, immigration, is of little help in the case of Finland. As shown by Professor Emeritus Matti Viren, immigrants do not help to correct the dependency ratio, as their employment levels tend to be far lower than those of the native population.7) In fact, Viren has observed that in Finland, only the two highest earning deciles pay more in taxes than they receive in benefits.8) The immigrant population is overrepresented in the lowest deciles, which shows that they do not add to the common pool of resources, but mostly receive from it.»

*

«All this means, that the long-term prospects of keeping up a vast welfare system seem bleak. Even now, in the middle of an economic upturn, that is finally coming to an end, the Finnish state is getting deeper into debt.9) The next recession will further exacerbate the situation, as those laid off will start to receive the unemployment benefits. In a recent interview, Heikki Hiilamo, professor of social policy at the University of Helsinki, brought up the possibility of dismantling the welfare state in a systematic and controlled fashion, since low fertility will make financing it impossible.10) This view represents the other of the two probable scenarios facing the Finnish welfare system in the coming years. An orderly dismantling of the social system, dispersed over several years, would mean gradual abandoning of many public services and drastic reduction in the public spending. However, all this would take place slowly, letting the society and the labor market adjust to the new situation. However, thanks to the unfavorable demographics, taxation would decrease rather slowly.»

*

«Cutting the public spending is a political suicide in a social democracy like Finland.»

*

«Second, discussing fertility seems to be perceived as an assault on the women’s rights. This means that a politician speaking about the lack of babies is branded as a henchman of the (imagined) patriarchy, whatever that means»

*

«In the long run, the Finnish welfare model has absolute zero chances of surviving»

* * * * * * *

Non è al momento possibile stabilire come e quando, ma in rapidi tempi finiti la Finlandia sperimenterà la dura realtà.


Gefira. 2019-05-24. The coming end of the Finnish welfare system

At the time of writing this, the negotiations to form the next Finnish government are in full swing. Currently, a red-green coalition, aided by either the liberal conservative National Coalition Party or the centrist-agrarian Center Party, seems a likely option. However, nothing is certain since the elections produced no clear winner. The three largest parties all gathered around 17% of the votes indicating a fractured electoral base.1) The negotiations might actually continue for some time to come.

The elections campaigns and debates were characterized by two things. First, there was much speculation regarding the popularity of the national conservative Finns Party, which changed its leadership in 2017 causing a split within the party.2) Second, the climate change was a major issue, which was extensively discussed and gained much visibility during the campaigning.2)

Both themes become understandable when considering the largely leftist-green discourse within the Finnish media. The rise of the Finns Party was feared, as its success could undermine the visions of the idealists inhabiting the larger cities, especially Helsinki and its surroundings. The climate change, on the other hand, was shamelessly utilized as a political tool to win votes of those struck by the climate anxiety.

It is telling, that the politicians were discussing with straight faces how Finland could work to stop the climate change. The notion that Finland with its puny population of 5,5 million could affect the climate in any meaningful way is demonstrably absurd, even insane. So, either the Finnish politicians have utterly lost their touch with the reality, or become mad, or are cynically lying. Given the track record of politicians in general, the last option is the likeliest one, which just proves the fact that in order to be a successful politician, one needs an utter and condescending contempt towards the voters. Otherwise the talk about the climate change remains incomprehensible.

There should have been a third theme also, however. That theme was one that was largely absent from the debates but very much present in the minds of those contemplating the economic and political future of Finland. That theme was demographics.

Since 2010, the Finnish total fertility rate has plummeted from its comparable low level of 1,87, to an all-time rock bottom of 1,41 in 2018,3) and there is no reason to assume that the trend will be reversed. Finland was hit quite badly by the financial crisis, and its economy really started to recover only in 2015,4) which can be seen as one major cause behind the low number of births. There has been some talk about the low fertility rate in the Finnish media in the recent years. However, there has been little political action to alleviate the situation. And, truth be told, the political actions to boost the fertility seem to be doomed anyway.5)

In Finland, there is a large and growing elderly population, but the number of tax payers is not increasing, but actually decreasing.6) The much-touted panacea, immigration, is of little help in the case of Finland. As shown by Professor Emeritus Matti Viren, immigrants do not help to correct the dependency ratio, as their employment levels tend to be far lower than those of the native population.7) In fact, Viren has observed that in Finland, only the two highest earning deciles pay more in taxes than they receive in benefits.8) The immigrant population is overrepresented in the lowest deciles, which shows that they do not add to the common pool of resources, but mostly receive from it.

All this means, that the long-term prospects of keeping up a vast welfare system seem bleak. Even now, in the middle of an economic upturn, that is finally coming to an end, the Finnish state is getting deeper into debt.9) The next recession will further exacerbate the situation, as those laid off will start to receive the unemployment benefits.

In a recent interview, Heikki Hiilamo, professor of social policy at the University of Helsinki, brought up the possibility of dismantling the welfare state in a systematic and controlled fashion, since low fertility will make financing it impossible.10) This view represents the other of the two probable scenarios facing the Finnish welfare system in the coming years. An orderly dismantling of the social system, dispersed over several years, would mean gradual abandoning of many public services and drastic reduction in the public spending. However, all this would take place slowly, letting the society and the labor market adjust to the new situation. However, thanks to the unfavorable demographics, taxation would decrease rather slowly.

This scenario, although reasonable, is not likely to take place. Cutting the public spending is a political suicide in a social democracy like Finland. And if one government would be willing to do it, what stops the next government reversing what has been done? Too many in Finland depend on the state, either directly or indirectly, to be willing to cut from anything. In a democracy this means that the spending will not be reformed to fit the means of state, but will continue until the state can no longer get any money from the financial markets.11) Then the system crashes, causing misery and political instability.

The question of demographics, directly responsible for the coming demise of the Finnish model, will not be addressed by the politicians. First of all, there is little they can do besides promising some extra spending for child-related services, financed, of course, by debt. Second, discussing fertility seems to be perceived as an assault on the women’s rights. This means that a politician speaking about the lack of babies is branded as a henchman of the (imagined) patriarchy, whatever that means.

The next economic downturn will show the way the Finnish politicians will choose regarding the future of the welfare system. The road of a controlled demolition is unlikely but desirable. It is probable that we will witness some cuts, but in general everything will likely continue as before.

What this means for the Finnish economy, is that the companies will have to prepare for heavier taxation, which will slowly but surely strangle some of them to death. Furthermore, the brain drain, which has plagued Finland for years,12) will likely speed up due to increasing taxation and declining economy, depriving the companies of valuable and much needed professionals, which further worsens the economic situation.

Politically, all this will initially benefit those ready to promise more spending. However, as the population realizes that none of the parties actually deliver anything else than misery, the trust in the public institutions is likely to erode, and the support for the radical political parties is likely to increase. Needless to say, all this will also weaken the democratic system, making it more susceptible to external influences13) and corruption.

In the long run, the Finnish welfare model has absolute zero chances of surviving. The question regarding the way in which it will come to an end, however, is still open. There is an option of slow and steady dismantlement, and also one of a more violent, crash-like scenario. Whichever option comes to pass, the days of the welfare state are numbered. And it may have fewer days left than we might think.

  1. ↑ Vaalitulos ratkesi äärimmäisen niukasti: Sdp suurin, vaali­päivän äänivyöry toi perus­suomalaiset lähes tasoihin – lue HS:n analyysit tuloksesta Source: Helsingin Sanomat

  2. ↑ Tekivätkö kampanjat eduskuntavaaleista ilmastovaalit vai jotkin muut? Tutkijat arvioivat, mitä teemoja puolueet korostivat Source: Helsingin Sanomat

  3. ↑ Jyrkkä käyrä näyttää Suomen poikkeuksellisen vauvakadon – ”Lapsia ei tehdä valtiota varten” Source: findikaattor

  4. ↑ Taloudellinen kasvu (BKT) Souce:

  5. ↑ Influence of women’s workforce participation and pensions on total fertility rate: a theoretical and econometric study. Source: Researchgate

  6. ↑ Väestöennuste 2018–2070 Source: Tilastokeskus

  7. Maahanmuutto-Talouden Ongelma Vai Ongelmien Ratkaisu?

  8. ↑ Professori: Suomeen on syntynyt mittava tulonsiirtojen varassa elävä uusi luokka – ”Mihin helvettiin olemme menossa?” Source: Iltalehti

  9. ↑ Yksi asia on sentään varma: Suomen valtio velkaantuu lisää – ”Profiili on stabiili” Source: kauppalehti

  10. ↑ Jyrkkä käyrä näyttää Suomen poikkeuksellisen vauvakadon – ”Lapsia ei tehdä valtiota varten” Source: Ilta Sanomat

  11. ↑ Admittedly, with the current low interest rates the debt can accumulate a long time without problems.

  12. ↑ Brain drain of Finnish researchers continues into second decade Source: Yle Muualla

  13. ↑ Russia’s Threat to Finland Source: Warsaw Institute

 

Annunci
Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Senza categoria

Europa. Calendario Elettorale 2019.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-04-27.

Europa 002

Europa. Risultati Elettorali 2017.

Europa. Risultati Elettorali 2018.

L’Unione Europea è governata dalla Commissione Europea, dall’europarlamento, ma, soprattutto, dal Consiglio Europeo, formato dai capi di stato o di governo dei paesi afferenti l’Unione.

Molte decisioni sono prese a maggioranza semplice, ma spesso è richiesta quella qualificata. Sulle questioni essenziali serve invece la unanimità. Esiste infine il diritto di veto.

Ma il controllo del Consiglio Europeo lo si combatte nelle elezioni politiche dei singoli stati.


Riportiamo da Edn Hub il calendario elettorale 2019.

Bruxelles – Il 2019 sarà l’anno delle elezioni europee, che si svolgeranno dal 23 al 26 maggio in tutta Europa. Ogni Stato membro dell’Ue avrà la libertà di definire in quali e per quanti giorni mantenere aperte le urne sul proprio territorio, per l’Italia la data sarà domenica 26 maggio. Un momento cruciale, quello di fine maggio, per il destino dell’Unione tutta ma anche dei partiti tradizionali, negli ultimi due anni messi in grande difficoltà, se non oscurati, dall’ascesa dei partiti populisti e sovranisti.

Molti gli appuntamenti anche alle urne nazionali nel 2019, dall’Italia – al voto per regionali ed amministrative – alla Grecia, passando per altri 9 Stati membri (Belgio, Estonia, Finlandia, Slovacchia, Lituania, Danimarca, Portogallo, Polonia e Romania).

Il calendario elettorale del 2019:

– UE – Elezioni europee dal 23 al 26 maggio. Qui i risultati delle prime proiezioni.

– ITALIA – Le elezioni amministrative si svolgeranno insieme alle elezioni europee – in programma domenica 26 maggio – come avvenne 5 anni fa.

In alcune regioni si è già votato per le regionali:

– Abruzzo (10 febbraio). Gli abruzzesi hanno premiato il centrodestra ed eletto Marco Marsilio alla presidenza della Regione: netto il risultato, affluenza però in forte calo. Marsilio ha raccolto il 48,03% dei consensi, staccando il candidato del centrosinistra allargato Giovanni Legnini che si è fermato al 31,28%. M5S terzo con il 20,20% dei voti.
Sardegna (24 febbraio). Il centrodestra ha espugnato anche la Sardegna con 47,78%, il nuovo presidente della Regione è Christian Solinas. Staccato al secondo posto il centrosinistra, guidato da Massimo Zedda, con il 32,92% dei voti. Il Movimento Cinquestelle si è fermato all’11,20%.

Basilicata (24 marzo). Il candidato governatore della Basilicata per il centrodestra Vito Bardi ha vinto con il 42,20%. Secondo Carlo Trerotola del centrosinistra al 33,11%, terzo Antonio Mattia del Movimento 5 stelle con il 20,32%
Le prossime regioni al voto saranno il Piemonte (26 maggio, insieme alle europee) ed Emilia-Romagna e Calabria in autunno.

– BELGIO – Il partito fiammingo di destra N-VA è dato dai sondaggi in vantaggio rispetto al Partito Socialista. Le elezioni si terranno il 26 maggio con le europee. A seguito della spaccatura nel governo sul Global Compact per i migranti, lo scorso 18 dicembre il premier Charles Michel ha rassegnato le sue dimissioni al re. Il re lo ha incaricato di rimanere in carica per gli affari correnti fino alle elezioni del 2019. Michel era diventato primo ministro nell’ottobre del 2014 e guida una coalizione di centrodestra composta da quattro partiti.

– ESTONIA – Il 3 marzo l’Estonia ha virato a destra con la vittoria della destra liberale e un boom dei sovranisti. Il partito riformista di opposizione, guidato dall’ex europarlamentare Kaja Kallas, ha ottenuto il 28,8% dei consensi battendo il Partito centrista del premier uscente Juri Ratas che si è dovuto accontentare di un secondo posto con il 23,1% dei consensi. Ma la vera novità è rappresentata dalla formazione euroscettica Ekre che si è piazzata terza con il 17,8%,raddoppiando i consensi rispetto alle elezioni del 2015, come prevedevano i sondaggi. Dopo difficili negoziati, il Parlamento estone ha respinto la nomina a premier di Kallas, affidando all’ex primo ministro Juri Ratas l’incarico per la formazione di un governo. La nuova coalizione è composta dal Partito di Centro di Ratas (25 seggi), i conservatori di Isamaa (12) e, a sorpresa, EKRE (19 seggi), per un totale 56 seggi su 101. .

– SLOVACCHIA – Il 30 marzo, Zuzana Čaputová ha vinto il secondo turno delle elezioni presidenziali in Slovacchia, diventando la prima donna a ricoprire il ruolo di presidente del paese. Ha ottenuto il 58%, contro il 42% del suo avversario, Maroš Šefčovič, del partito di centrosinistra Direzione – Socialdemocrazia (Smer) e  commissario Ue per l’unione energetica dal 2014. Čaputová, avvocata ambientalista e attivista, fa parte del piccolo partito europeista Progressive Slovakia. Al primo turno, aveva ottenuto il 40,5% dei voti contro il 18,7% di Šefčovič. Nel 2018 la Slovacchia ha attraversato una crisi politica scatenata dall’omicidio del giornalista Jan Kuciak e della sua fidanzata, che ha portato alle dimissioni del primo ministro Robert Fico (Smer-SD). In seguito, l’ex presidente Kiska ha designato primo ministro ad interim Peter Pellegrini, anch’egli socialdemocratico. Le prossime elezioni parlamentari slovacche si terranno nel 2020.

– FINLANDIA – Il 14 aprile sono stati i cittadini finlandesi a recarsi alle urne per rinnovare il parlamento. La sinistra ha vinto di un soffio le elezioni politiche – e potrebbe tornare a guidare il governo dopo 20 anni – con un vantaggio risicato sui populisti dei Veri Finlandesi che hanno mancato un clamoroso trionfo per una frazione di punto. Il Partito socialdemocratico (Sdp), guidato di Antti Rinne, ha ottenuto il 17,7% rispetto al 17,5% dei ‘Veri Finlandesi’, alleati di Matteo Salvini. La partita per guidare il Paese è ora nelle mani dei socialdemocratici dell’ex sindacalista Rinne: la maggioranza dei finlandesi sembra aver puntato sulla lotta al cambiamento climatico e sulla difesa del generoso modello di welfare invidiato in tutto il mondo, ma indebolito da anni di austerità sotto il governo di centrodestra dell’ex premier Juha Sipila. Sipila si era dimesso il mese scorso proprio dopo la bocciatura della sua riforma sanitaria, che voleva ridurre sensibilmente i costi per la salute. E anche le urne hanno confermato che le sue ricette non sono state apprezzate: il suo partito di centro si è piazzato quarto, dietro anche ai conservatori.

– SPAGNA – Il premier spagnolo socialista, Pedro Sanchez, ha annunciato che le elezioni generali anticipate si terranno il 28 aprile. A febbraio il Parlamento iberico aveva bocciato il progetto di finanziaria di Sanchez, con i voti dei partiti di centro destra Pp e Ciudadanos e degli indipendentisti catalani. Per questo il premier ha ritenuto opportuno convocare elezioni anticipate. Secondo gli ultimi sondaggi, i socialisti sarebbero in vantaggio con circa il 31% dei voti, seguiti dai popolari con il 20%, Ciudadanos al 14,4% e Podemos all’11,4%. La formazione di estrema destra Vox è data all’11,2 per cento. Se le percentuali fossero queste, il partito di Pedr Sanchez non otterrebbe la maggioranza assoluta di 176 seggi necessari per governare da solo, quindi un governo di coalizione sarebbe altamente probabile.

– LITUANIA – Il 12 maggio i lituani andranno alle urne per eleggere il successore di Dalia Grybauskaitė, prima donna presidente della Lituania, in carica dal 2009 come indipendente (sostenuta dai conservatori) e giunta ora al termine del suo secondo mandato. In corsa per la successione anche il commissario europeo alla Salute, Vytenis Andriukaitis (Socialisti). I sondaggi danno in testa l’economista indipendente Gitanas Nausėda (i cui consensi si aggirano intorno al 25%).

– DANIMARCA – I 179 seggi del Parlamento danese – Folketing – sono in attesa di essere rinnovati. La data delle elezioni non è ancora nota ma dovranno svolgersi entro giugno. Nelle elezioni del 2015, il partito liberale Venstre formò un governo di minoranza di stampo conservatore, guidato dal premier Lars Løkke Rasmussen.

– GRECIA: domenica 20 ottobre i greci saranno chiamati alle urne per rinnovare Voulí ton Ellínon, il parlamento ellenico. Saranno le prime elezioni politiche per il Paese dopo l’addio della Troika e l’uscita dal tunnel della crisi economica. Il premier in carica Alexis Tsipras, leader di Syriza (Sinistra Radicale),  è però dato indietro nei sondaggi (al 26%) rispetto al centro-destra del partito Nea Dimokratia, guidato da Kyriakos Mitsotakis (36%). Staccati gli altri: gli estremisti di destra della Chrysí Avgí sono dati all’8%; stessa percentuala dei socialisti di Kinima Allagis; i comunisti del Kommounistikó Kómma Elládas si attestano al 7%; mentre il partito di centro, Enosi Kentroon, riscuote solo il 2% dei consensi.

PORTOGALLO – Il centrosinistra è in vantaggio nei sondaggi delle elezioni politiche che si svolgeranno il 6 ottobre: il primo ministro socialista Antonio Costa appare nettamente in testa (i sondaggi lo danno al 39%), anche se per ottenere la maggioranza potrebbe avere ancora bisogno di stringere accordi i partiti democratici di sinistra.

POLONIA – Le prossime elezioni parlamentari si terranno non più tardi di novembre. Il partito della destra anti-europeista Diritto e Giustizia del premier Mateusz Morawiecki guida ampiamente sondaggi con il 42%.

ROMANIA Presidenziali in programma a novembre o dicembre. I Socialisti sono dati come favoriti, tanto da puntare a spodestare l’attuale presidente liberale Klaus Iohannis, che ha annunciato la sua ricandidatura.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo

Europa. Risultati Elettorali 2018.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-04-26.

Europa 002

Riportiamo da Edn Hub i risultati elettorali 2018.

Dopo un anno elettorale cruciale per l’Unione europea, il 2017, la sfida dei Ventotto al populismo ha caratterizzato anche il 2018. A confrontarsi con i risultati delle urne sono stati a vario titolo 11 Stati membri: dall’Italia all’Irlanda, passando per Ungheria, Repubblica Ceca, Cipro, Finlandia, Svezia. Il destino dei partiti tradizionali, davanti all’ascesa dei rivali populisti, è apparso ancora molto incerto. Tra gli appuntamenti più attesi, le elezioni in Italia il 4 marzo, dove gli euro-scettici del Movimento 5 Stelle non hanno disatteso  i favori dei pronostici e sono andati al governo con il partito di destra anti-migranti della Lega Nord.

I risultati elettorali del 2018:

– REPUBBLICA CECA – Al ballottaggio del 26 e 27 gennaio, in un serrato testa a testa, il presidente uscente Milos Zeman ha battuto lo sfidante Jiri Drahos, ex presidente dell’Accademia delle Scienze (Csav), con il 51,3% dei consensi. Si riconferma quindi la linea euroscettica e populista portata avanti nello scorso mandato da Zeman, che mantiene Praga orientata verso l’est dell’Europa, allacciata ai Visegrad (Polonia, Ungheria e Slovacchia), muro anti Ue nell’accoglienza ai migranti. Zeman ha promesso di affidare ad Andrej Babis, vincitore delle elezioni politiche in Repubblica Ceca nell’ottobre del 2017, il secondo tentativo di formare un governo. L’affluenza ha raggiunto il record del 66,6%.

– FINLANDIA – Domenica 28 gennaio la Finlandia si è recata alle urne per eleggere il nuovo presidente per un mandato di sei anni. Il presidente uscente, Sauli Niinisto, è stato rieletto al primo turno con il 62,7% dei suffragi, quasi cinque volte di più del suo sfidante più vicino, il verde Pekka Haavisto, che si è fermato al 12,4%. Niniisto, 69 anni, ex ministro delle Finanze ed ex speaker del parlamento, è stato un presidente molto popolare sin dall’inizio del suo mandato nel 2012. Si è presentato come indipendente, senza associarsi al partito conservatore che in passato aveva presieduto. “Sono sorpreso e colpito da questo sostegno”, ha detto ai media dopo la vittoria. Deludente invece il risultato dei Veri Finlandesi, partito conosciuto per le sue forti posizioni anti-europeiste e nazionaliste, in forte ascesa negli ultimi anni: la candidata Laura Huhtasaari si è fermata al 6,8%.

– CIPRO –  A 5 anni di distanza dalle ultime elezioni presidenziali di Cipro nel 2013, il voto di domenica 28 gennaio ha visto contrapposti su tutti il presidente in carica conservatore Nicos Anastasiades e il principale avversario, Stavros Malas, sostenuto dal partito comunista Akel.  Arrivati al ballottaggio (al primo turno Anastasiades era arrivato primo con il 35,5% dei voti, Malas secondo con il 30,2%), il 4 febbraio il 71enne Anastasiades è stato rieletto presidente ricevendo il 56% dei voti, mentre il suo avversario Stavros Malas ha raccolto il 44% dei voti. I due si erano già sfidati nelle elezioni del 2013, quando Anastasiades vinse con un larghissimo vantaggio; a questa tornata è stata ricompensata la stabilità ottenuta dal paese durante la sua carica, ma Malas ha ricevuto comunque più voti rispetto alle aspettative. La questione della riunificazione dell’isola è stata al centro della campagna elettorale di Nicosia. Il 7 gennaio è stata rinnovata l’Assemblea dell’autoproclamata Repubblica turca di Cipro del Nord (Rtcn), che ha sancito la vittoria Partito di unità nazionale (Ubp) – vicino ad Ankara e per il mantenimento dello status quo -, ma non la formazione di un governo che è ancora in discussione. Proprio la necessità di riprendere il dialogo con la Turchia sul processo di riunificazione in funzione di uno stato federale è stato uno dei temi al centro del dibattito elettorale e sarà la maggior sfida di Anastasiades.

– ITALIA – Il 4 marzo è stata la volta degli elettori italiani, chiamati alle urne per le elezioni politiche. A sfidarsi sono stati la coalizione di centro-destra guidata dall’ex premier Silvio Berlusconi affiancato dal leader della Lega, Matteo Salvini, i populisti del Movimento Cinque Stelle con Luigi Di Maio candidato premier, e il Partito Democratico di Matteo Renzi. Il Movimento 5 stelle ha ottenuto più del 30 per cento dei voti sia alla Camera sia al Senato, sopratutto grazie alle regioni del centro e dell’Italia del sud. La Lega ha superato Forza Italia e il Partito democratico è sotto al 20%. Liberi e Uguali ha superato la soglia di sbarramento del 3%. L’affluenza è stata del 72,9%, la più bassa nelle elezioni politiche dal 1948 a oggi. Con questi numeri, nessuna forza politica ha ottenuto una maggioranza assoluta in parlamento, ma dopo oltre due mesi e mezzo di trattative M5S e Lega si sono alleati dando vita a un governo di stampo populista, presieduto dal premier Giuseppe Conte.

– UNGHERIA – L’8 aprile si sono tenute le elezioni politiche in Ungheria. Fidesz, il partito del primo ministro Viktor Orbán, populista di destra, ha vinto con il 49% dei consensi, riconquistando la maggioranza dei due terzi in parlamento e avviandosi al suo terzo mandato consecutivo dal 2010. Secondo è il partito Jobbik con il 20%, terza l’alleanza socialisti-verdi con 12%.  La sfida sembra essere tutta a destra, con il partito Jobbik di estrema destra a rappresentare il più grande rivale di Orban.

– SLOVENIA – Anno di campagna elettorale per la Slovenia, con le elezioni generali a giugno e quelle locali a novembre. Alle politiche del 4 giugno, il conservatore Janez Jansa e il suo Partito democratico sloveno (SDS), che sono su posizioni anti-migranti e alleati del leader nazionalista ungherese Viktor Orban, hanno vinto con il 25% dei voti. Jansa non è però stato in grado di formare una maggioranza. A guidare il Paese è dunque Marjan Sarec (LMS), che con la Lista omonima si era piazzato secondo con il 12,6%, ed è appoggiato da cinque partiti di centrosinistra in un governo di minoranza.

– SVEZIA – Il 9 settembre 2018 è stato il turno della Svezia di andare al voto. I socialdemocratici del premier uscente Stefan Lofven sono risultati nuovamente la prima forza, con il 28,4% dei consensi, ma è il risultato peggiore per il partito dal 1920. Secondi, con il 19,7%, la destra dei Moderati guidati da Ulf Kristersson. Terzi, in ascesa al 17,7%, i populisti e sovranisti del partito Svedesi Democratici, guidati da Jimmie Akesson. Al momento, il blocco del centrosinistra e del centrodestra sono appaiati intorno al 40%, ma non hanno i numeri per governare. Nelle prossime settimane saranno dunque decisive le trattative per formare un governo di coalizione.

– LETTONIA – Dalle elezioni politiche di sabato 6 ottobre, le tredicesime nei 100 anni di storia del Paese, è emerso il primato del partito filorusso Concordia (Harmony) al 19,8%, che però ha scarse possibilità di dar vita a un governo. Lo scenario che si presenta – come peraltro avvenuto in tutte le ultime elezioni politiche nei Paesi dell’Ue – è una lunghissima trattativa tra forze politiche anche molto diverse, per mettere in piedi una coalizione. Brusco calo di consensi per il partito liberal-conservatore, una volta potentissimo, del vicepresidente della Commissione europea ed ex premier del Paese baltico, Valdis Dombrovskis. Il suo Unità (‘Vienotiba’ in lettone) – uno dei tre partiti che compongono la maggioranza uscente – è crollato al 6,7%, ottenendo appena otto seggi. Alle politiche del 2014, registrò il 21,8% con 23 seggi. Dombrovskis si dice comunque “fiducioso che il Paese sarà in grado di istituire un governo fermamente pro-europeo”, anche se a guidarlo non sarà più probabilmente il premier uscente Maris Kucinskis. La maggioranza tripartitica di centro-destra, dimezzata nei consensi, dovrà cercare nuove alleanze pescando tra una serie di formazioni che viaggiano intorno al 10-13%. Secondo gli analisti locali, alla fine si potrebbe arrivare a un ‘pentapartito’, che rischia tuttavia di avere problemi di tenuta, per le distanze programmatiche tra le formazioni. E’ invece altamente improbabile che a formare l’esecutivo sia chiamato il partito Concordia, che ha nella minoranza russa il proprio elettorato di riferimento e che finora è stato sempre tenuto fuori dalla stanza dei bottoni grazie a una sorta di cordone sanitario messo in atto dalle altre forze politiche, preoccupate dell’eventuale ingresso di un cavallo di Troia del Cremlino negli affari politici europei: fino al 2017 Concordia aveva anche un accordo di cooperazione col partito di Putin Russia Unita. Al momento, soltanto i secondi arrivati, i populisti euroscettici di Kpv Lv sarebbero disponibili ad allearsi coi filorussi, ma il loro 14,2% non è comunque sufficiente a garantire una maggioranza.

– BELGIOUna incontestabile vittoria per i Verdi è, in sintesi, il risultato delle Comunali che si sono svolte in Belgio. Domenica 14 ottobre si sono tenute le elezioni provinciali, municipali e distrettuali belghe. La regione di Bruxelles è andata al voto con 19 comuni, le Fiandre con 5 province e 300 comuni (nella città di Anversa si sono tenutee anche le elezioni per i distretti), e la Vallonia con 5 province e 262 comuni. A Bruxelles i Verdi passano da uno a tre borgomastri (sindaci), facendo breccia nei 19 comuni della capitale belga e sembrerebbero pronti ad entrare in una maggioranza con il Ps, quest’ultimo largamente in testa che realizza globalmente dei buoni risultati nella regione di Bruxelles. Ammaccato il Mr (Liberali), mentre al sud del Paese, in Vallonia, si registra una buona performance per il Ptb, il Partito del lavoro, di estrema sinistra che diventa il terzo partito a Liegi ed il secondo a Charleroi e a Seraing. Nelle Fiandre, nord del paese, il nazionalismo fiammingo tiene: roccaforte della Nuova alleanza fiamminga (N-va), la città conferma il suo leader, Bart De Wever, sindaco. Resta da capire con chi si alleeranno i nazionalisti. Altro dato significativo quello delle donne a Bruxelles: il 48,8% risultano elette, un vero e proprio record. Nulla di fatto invece per il partito Islam che non ha ottenuto alcun eletto.

– LUSSEMBURGOAlle elezioni del 15 ottobre, i tre partiti della coalizione di governo uscente – i socialisti della Lsap, Dp (la formazione di stampo liberale di Bettel) e i Verdi -, hanno riconfermato la maggioranza assoluta dei seggi in Parlamento (31 su 60). Il partito di centro-destra Csv (cristiano sociali), dell’ex premier e attuale presidente della Commissione europea, Jean-Claude Juncker, si è invece aggiudicato la maggioranza relativa con il 28,3% dei voti e 21 seggi. Il granduca del Lussemburgo, Henri Albert Guillaume, ha incaricato il premier uscente, il liberale Xavier Bettel a formare un nuovo governo.

– IRLANDA – Elezioni presidenziali senza sorprese in Irlanda: Michael D. Higgins, 77 anni, letterato di idee liberal, è stato confermato per un secondo settennato alla carica di capo dello Stato, sostanzialmente di garanzia, ma priva di veri poteri nel sistema istituzionale della repubblica. Higgins, nel rispetto delle previsioni della vigilia, ha segnato una netta vittoria al primo turno con oltre il 58% di voti. Il meno lontano dei 5 rivali è l’uomo d’affari indipendente Peter Casey, dato poco sopra il 20%, mentre tutti gli altri sono sotto il 10 con la prima donna in lizza, Liadh Ni
Riad, eurodeputata dello Sinn Fein (sinistra nazionalista) al terzo posto attorno all’8%. In calo l’affluenza alle urne rispetto al 2011.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Finlandia. Socialdemocratici 40 seggi, Finns 39, Coalizione Nazionale 31.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-04-15.

2019-04-15__Finlandia__001

Finland election: Right-wing Finns Party surges in poll

«With over 97% of ballots counted, the Social Democrats took 17.8% of the vote, with the Finns Party on 17.6%.»

*

«The centre-right National Coalition is slightly behind the Finns Party while ex-PM Juha Sipila’s Centre Party has seen its support plummet.»

*

«The Social Democrats have won 40 seats in the 200-seat parliament, one more than the Finns Party, and coalition-building lies ahead. …. Before the election, the Finns Party had 17 seats.»

*

«Balancing taxes and spending is problematic for any government, and Finland’s personal income tax rate – at 51.6% – is among the highest in Europe.»

*

«Today’s result could also be felt outside Finland’s borders, as the country is set to take presidency of the European Union in July. The Finns Party success could affect EU policy making.»

*

«The Finns Party has already announced an alliance with Germany’s far-right AfD, Italy’s League party and the Danish People’s Party for the European elections in May.»

*

«They plan to form a parliamentary group, the European Alliance for People and Nations, to challenge the power of centrist parties.»

* * * * * * *

Se è vero che i socialdemocratici abbiano la maggioranza relativa, sarebbe altrettanto vero considerare che il Finns Party ne avrebbe ottenuto solo un seggio in meno.

Poi, per formare un governo servirebbe una coalizione, e nessuno si potrebbe stupire se alla fine si arrivasse ad una soluzione tipo quella che si è vista in Estonia.

*

Come nota a margine, il voto finlandese in seno al Consiglio Europeo non sarà più quello di prima.


Finlandia: socialdemocratici primi e populisti quasi

Socialdemocratici vittoriosi di misura, e ora c’è da chiedersi se potranno governare e con chi: in Finlandia non si può parlare di vera svolta, perché i primi dati, che rafforzavano il centrosinistra e relegavano al quarto posto il Partito dei Veri Finlandesi, sono poi stati ridimensionati se non sovvertiti nelle ore successive. La destra populista alla fine è seconda a un’incollatura dai socialdemocratici.

Facile immaginare che la tendenza potesse cambiare, perché i dati forniti subito dopo la chiusura dei seggi erano quelli del voto anticipato, cioè circa un terzo degli aventi diritto. In Finlandia una norma varata nel 1970 per favorire la partecipazione elettorale consente di votare in anticipo rispetto al giorno di apertura dei seggi, e quest’anno si è votato per una settimana fino a martedì scorso. Il risultato di quel voto è stato fornito nella domenica elettorale subito dopo la chiusura dei seggi, e il resto del conteggio si è aggiunto poco alla volta.

Evidentemente l’orientamento di chi ha votato di domenica è diverso da quelli che avevano votato in anticipo.

Fatto sta che il Parlamento di Helsinki offre ora ancora meno soluzioni per un governo, con i 200 seggi divisi tra otto partiti, i primi quattro dei quali superano i 30 seggi.

In pratica, o si ripropone la coalizione uscente a tre (centristi, il centrodestra di Coalizione Nazionale e populisti), che però il premier Sipilä non voleva ritenendo che i Veri Finlandesi si fossero spostati troppo a destra, oppure si potrebbe pensare a un’alleanza dei centristi con i socialdemocratici, i verdi e la sinistra. Ma anche in questo caso la governabilità è dubbia.

Difficile individuare il vincitore reale (forse nessuno) e quello morale (rivendicano questo ruolo sia i socialdemocratici, sia i Veri Finlandesi di cui l’alleato Salvini celebra il successo).

Lo sconfitto invece è più facile da individuare e ha nome e cognome: Juha Sipilä. Il premier uscente paga lo scotto, il suo partito ha perso 18 seggi rispetto alle elezioni del 2015 e anche se dovesse far parte di una coalizione di governo, a destra o a sinistra, è difficile immaginare che Sipilä possa ancora ricoprire un ruolo.

D’altra parte lo stesso premier uscente ha ammesso la sconfitta, e se ne è assunto la responsabilità, quando lo spoglio era ancora in corso.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Finlandia. Elezioni. Socialdemocratici stimati al 19%, Finns Party al 16.3%.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-04-14.

2019-04-14__Finlandia__001

Oggi si vota in Finlandia per le elezioni politiche.

Dagli ultimi sondaggi, che confermano quelli degli ultimi mesi, i socialdemocratici potrebbe ottenere la maggioranza relativa con il 19%, subito seguiti dal Finns Party con il 16.3% e dalla Coalizione Nazionale con il 15.9%.

*

Dal punto di vista prettamente numerico, la Finlandia si avvia ad avere un governo di coalizione, che richiederà ai partiti, almeno tre, meglio quattro, una notevole duttilità.

*

Finland Poised for Rare Turn Left as Election Race Tightens [Bloomberg]

– Polls show SDP lead, populists surge ahead of Sunday’s vote

– Prime Minister Sipila expected to be denied second term

*

Finland is about to take a step to the left, a rare occurrence in Europe’s recent political history, with the Social Democratic Party favored to emerge as the biggest after Sunday’s election.

Latest polls show the SDP holding on to a narrowing lead, with two center-right parties and the anti-immigrant Finns party in a neck-and-neck race for second place.

A Social Democratic win would give leader Antti Rinne the first attempt to form a government and become the party’s first prime minister in 16 years. Public support for the current opposition has been fueled by discontent with the Center Party of Prime Minister Juha Sipila, a millionaire who has pushed through painful reforms in a successful attempt to restore the country’s economic fortunes.

Many voters are also frustrated with a failure to pass a health-care reform that’s been more than a decade in the making. A recent uproar over neglect at private elderly care homes has also hurt the National Coalition Party, a champion of privatization. ….

Spending is being cut while Finland is richer than it’s ever been before ….

An increasingly fragmented political landscape means coalition building may prove tricky. The populist Finns Party has seen its support surge during the campaign, but most parties don’t want to cooperate with the group, which has become more stridently anti-immigrant under the leadership of Jussi Halla-aho.»

*

I problemi maggiori sono una situazione economica che imporrebbe una riduzione delle spese per il welfare ed, in secondo piano, la immigrazione.

Uno dei nodi apparentemente insolubili è la conventio ad excludendum, per cui i partiti tradizionali non vogliono coalizzarsi con il Finns Party.

Questa è una caratteristica di comportamento politico dei liberal socialisti, che corre però il pericolo di non riconoscere le tensioni politiche e sociali che hanno determinato un Finns Party quale secondo partito finlandese.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Senza categoria, Unione Europea

Finlandia. Il 14 aprile si terranno le elezioni politiche. Scenario incerto.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-04-07.

2019-04-05__Finlandia__001

Questi sono i principali partiti in gioco.

2019-04-05__Finlandia__002

Suomen sosialidemokraattinen puolue

Social Democratic Party of Finland ( S&D) 35 / 200 seggi.

«The Social Democratic Party of Finland, shortened to the Social Democrats, is a social-democratic political party in Finland. The party holds 35 seats in Finland’s parliament. The party has set many fundamental policies of Finnish society during its representation in the Finnish Government. Founded in 1899, the SDP is Finland’s oldest active political party. The SDP has a close relationship with Finland’s largest trade union, SAK, and is a member of the Socialist International, the Party of European Socialists, and SAMAK.»

*

Suomen Keskusta

Centre Party of Finland (Alde) 48 / 200 seggi.

*

Vihreä liitto

Green League (Grune – European Free Alliance) 15 / 200 seggi.

*

Kansallinen Kokoomus

National Coalition (EPP) 38 / 200 seggi.

The National Coalition Party is a centre-right political party in Finland considered to be liberal, conservative, and liberal-conservative. Founded in 1918, the National Coalition Party is one of the three largest parties in Finland, along with the Social Democratic Party and the Centre Party. The current party chair is Petteri Orpo, elected on 11 June 2016. The party self-statedly bases its politics on “freedom, responsibility and democracy, equal opportunities, education, supportiveness, tolerance and caring” and supports multiculturalism and gay rights. It is pro-NATO and pro-European as well as a member of the European People’s Party (EPP).

*

Perussuomalaiset

Finns Party (European Conservatives and Reformists) 17 / 200 seggi.

The Finns Party, formerly known in English as the True Finns, is a Finnish conservative political party, founded in 1995 following the dissolution of the Finnish Rural Party.

*

Vasemmistoliitto

Left Alliance (Party of European left) 12 / 200 seggi.

* * * * * * *

Le previsioni attuali non indicherebbero grandi sommovimenti.  In comparazione con le elezioni del 2014:

– Spd, da 16.5% → 20.1%

– Kokoomus da 18.2% → 15.8%

– Perus da 17.7%  → 15.1%

– Kesk da 21.1%  → 14.4%

– Vihreä da 8.5% → 13.0%.

I finlandesi dovranno formare verosimilmente un governo di coalizione, diverso da quello attuale, che avrebbe perso la maggioranza.

* * * * * * *


A really simple guide to Finland’s 2019 parliamentary election

On 14 April voters will choose a new parliament and government in Finland, with 200 MPs to be elected.

The current three-party government coalition is led by Prime Minister Juha Sipilä‘s Centre Party, with the National Coalition Party (NCP) and the Blue Reform party also holding ministerial posts in the cabinet. Those parties currently control 104 of the 200 seats in the Finnish parliament.

This is a thin majority for a country used to relatively broad-based coalitions; the previous government elected in 2011 included six of the then-eight parties in parliament. The electorate is divided into 15 regional constituencies that each elect MPs using a proportional system.

Sipilä’s three-party coalition has been more ideologically coherent, with market-based reforms and austerity dominating the agenda. The Sipilä government took office in 2015 pledging four billion euros in annual spending cuts, and ended up cutting education and social security budgets while forcing through an increase in working time for most employees.

The April election could see a big shift in policy if Sipilä and his Centre Party do not do well enough for him to continue as premier.

What are the issues?

The government’s controversial and unfinished reform of health and social care (‘sote’) is one of the biggest issues facing the country, but few voters fully understand it.

A spate of recent scandals about standards at care homes has pushed that issue to the top of the political agenda, ensuring that parties are now discussing tightening the rules for operators of facilities for the elderly.

After recent alarming news about climate change, the Green Party is framing this year’s vote as the last chance to save the world, hoping for a ‘climate election’. The nationalist Finns Party meanwhile is pushing to make immigration a central theme of the election campaign, especially after a series of sexual abuse cases in Oulu in which the suspects were asylum seekers or immigrants.

You can explore candidates approach to these and other issues with the help of Yle’s election compass, which is available in English.

Who’s likely to win?

The Social Democrats have been leading the polls and hope to emerge from the election as the biggest party.

The party that wins the most MPs in the 200-member parliament gets the opportunity to form a government. To do that it will need to form a coalition with other parties commanding at least 101 MPs between them.

If they get the mandate to negotiate, the SDP is likely to look to the Green Party as a potential coalition partner, as well as the Left Alliance. Those three parties have been consistent critics of the current government’s austerity budgets and labour market reforms.

The Greens have been pushing to break into the ‘big three’ of Finnish politics (the NCP, SDP and Centre), as their poll numbers rose after the last election before dipping again. They recently changed leader, electing former presidential candidate Pekka Haavisto to replace Touko Aalto, after Aalto took extended sick leave.

Those parties are unlikely to constitute a majority, however, so the NCP or Centre Party may be asked to join the new administration along with a smaller party like the Swedish People’s Party or Christian Democratic Party, or even the Blue Reform party that split from the Finns Party in 2017.The winning parties are likely to face tough choices in creating a working coalition, however, as the electoral arithmetic might not throw up an obvious, ideologically-coherent combination.

What about President Niinistö?

Finland’s popular president Sauli Niinistö, who brought together Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin last year, is not up for re-election having won a second term in 2018. His role is in foreign policy and diplomacy, as the president acts as a figurehead rather than getting his or her hands dirty in domestic politics.

It is unlikely any coalition government would have big disagreements with Niinistö, who has been president since 2012 and was formerly a member of the National Coalition party.

What happens next?

Coalition negotiations can drag on: In 2011 it took more than two months from election to confirmation of Jyrki Katainen as Prime Minister.

Horsetrading and political wrangling aside, it’s a big year for elections in Finland. New MEPs are due to be elected on 26 May, and new regional assemblies may (or may not) be elected as part of the troubled ‘sote’ reform.

A recent economic upswing might well run out of steam in the coming years, leaving the incoming administration less room to manoeuvre than they might like.

A really simple guide to the main parties

– The Centre Party is a centrist party that enjoys strong voter support in the countryside. It has liberal and traditionalist wings.

-The centre-right National Coalition is an economically liberal party that is popular in cities and among higher-income groups.

– The Blue Reform split from the Finns Party after a hardliner took over as party chair in June 2017. The coalition partners objected and kicked the Finns Party out of government, but eventually accepted the Blue Reform ministers and MPs who broke with the Finns Party back into the coalition.

– The Finns Party is a right-wing populist party that is opposed to immigration and the EU.

– The Social Democratic Party is a centre-left party with strong links to Finland’s trade unions.

– The Green Party is an environment-focused party founded in the 1970s with a growing supporter base among young, urban voters.

– The Left Alliance is a left-wing group with roots in the Communist party and strong links to the labour movement.

– The Swedish People’s Party is a liberal party advocating for Finland’s Swedish-speaking minority.

– The Christian Democrat Party is a small, socially conservative party with links to Christian religious groups.

*


Finlandia. Governo Sipila dimissionario. Elezioni il 14 aprile.

«The changes were crucial to the three-party governing coalition’s plan to balance public finances.

Financial constraints are colliding with the healthcare costs imposed by Finland’s fast-ageing population. But cutting those costs is a major political obstacle in a Nordic country that historically has provided an extensive — and expensive — healthcare system.»

*


Le elezioni politiche in Finlandia

Nonostante l’attuale governo abbia vissuto una crisi che lo ha quasi portato alle prime elezioni anticipate in oltre 40 anni, la legislatura finlandese sta giungendo alla sua naturale conclusione e il prossimo 14 aprile si terranno le elezioni politiche. Per usare un’espressione forse esagerata, a queste latitudini, si sta per entrare nel vivo della campagna elettorale. Chi sia abituato alle campagne elettorali continue, non troverà niente di simile nel Paese nordico, dove i ministri fanno i ministri, nelle loro sedi, e non passano giorno e notte partecipando a show televisivi, producendone di propri, non proprio raffinati, col cellulare brandito come un gladio. In questo paese che probabilmente è solo normale, nonostante certe difficoltà di produzione, latte di renna non ne è ancora stato versato.

Come le elezioni anticipate, anche i brogli elettorali sono praticamente sconosciuti, e anche per questo la scheda elettorale finlandese è un capolavoro minimalista: un foglio ripiegato in due con l’esterno interamente bianco (verrà vidimato con un timbro prima di essere inserito nell’urna) e, all’interno, da un lato il nome e l’anno della consultazione (nelle due lingue ufficiali), e dall’altro un cerchio dove l’elettore andrà a scrivere un numero che equivale a un candidato.

Il sistema elettorale finlandese è un proporzionale secco, in cui i 200 seggi della camera unica sono divisi in 13 circoscrizioni elettorali, il cui numero di seggi è assegnato in base alla popolazione dell’ultimo censimento. Per il 2019 c’è solo un cambiamento: il distretto di Uusimaa, la regione attorno a Helsinki, eleggerà 36 parlamentari, un seggio in più rispetto al 2015, sottratto alla circoscrizione del Savo-Carelia. La capitale Helsinki è un distretto a parte che vale 22 seggi.

In Finlandia è ammesso il voto postale, sia domestico (ci sono seggi alle poste, nelle biblioteche e in altri luoghi pubblici) che dall’estero. Nell’ultima tornata del 2015 il ne ha fatto uso il 32% dei votanti. Come in Italia le elezioni politiche sono le più popolari, l’affluenza alle urne nel 2015 è stata 70%, tre punti in meno rispetto alle ultime politiche in Italia.

Il sistema usato, il metodo D’Hondt, favorisce i grandi partiti tradizionali quindi, per i nostalgici della Prima Repubblica, porta spesso a strane alleanze che possono ricordare i tempi del Pentaparito.

I sondaggi danno in vantaggio i socialdemocratici, risaliti sopra la soglia del 20% dopo il tonfo del 2015 (16,5%), in crescita anche i Verdi e l’Alleanza di sinistra, mentre si prevede una batosta per i partiti di governo. Con nessun partito in posizione di netta prevalenza, non sarà semplice trovare una maggioranza per il prossimo primo ministro.

Per gli italiani cresciuti con silenzi elettorali, par condicio, pubblicità solo in spazi e fasce determinate, la campagna elettorale in Finlandia può sembrare un potenziale far west, visto che non ci sono forti regolamentazioni, le pubblicità si vedono dappertutto e non ci sono cronometraggi o spartizioni, ma almeno fino ad ora non ci sono stati particolari abusi o contestazioni sull’equità dei dibattiti. Sono al contrario le pubblicità “ordinarie” a essere consigliate di non imitare o assomigliare troppo a pubblicità politiche durante la campagna elettorale.

Uno strumento estremamente utile è il Vaalikone, la “macchina del voto” (qui quello del 2015), un sistema elettronico messo in piedi per la prima volta nel 1996 dalla tv nazionale YLE in cui a tutti i candidati vengono fatte le stesse domande, tutte le risposte vengono poi messe all’interno di questa “macchina”, che altro non è che un sito web dove gli elettori possono rispondere a un questionario contenente le stesse identiche domande fatte ai politici. In base alle risposte al questionario, il sistema suggerisce i candidati più vicini alle proprie idee ed opinioni. Al contrario di piattaforme informatiche nostrane, il sistema e i dati del Vaalikone sono completamente aperti e accessibili a tutti. Il Vaalikone di YLE è stato poco dopo copiato anche da altri media, come il quotidiano Helsingin Sanomat e la tv privata MTV3; questi altri sistemi variano per struttura e domande ma non nell’idea generale. Negli ultimi anni sono state anche aggiunti altri contenuti come schede e videointerviste, sempre democraticamente di formato identico e per tutti i candidati.

Un’altra peculiarità è quello che succede dopo la chiusura delle urne. La tradizione nostrana esige maratone televisive, stillicidio di dati, i leader che escono solo a risultati quasi confermati. In Finlandia i tempi dello spoglio sono piuttosto brevi (raramente si va oltre la mezzanotte) e, grazie al voto postale che viene conteggiato già durante il pomeriggio delle votazioni, si hanno quasi subito dei risultati concreti. Quindi la tradizione vuole che tutti i leader di partito siedano nello stesso spazio, in genere la sede della YLE a Helsinki, per commentare in diretta i risultati l’istante dopo la chiusura ufficiale delle urne. Solo più tardi nella serata i leader si recano al quartier generale del partito.

Per un occhio italiano è strano vedere politici di partiti diversi discutere pacatamente in televisione, soprattutto appena dopo un’elezione. E questa serata non è un’eccezione, sono molto comuni dibattiti elettorali con rappresentanti di tutti i partiti condividono civilmente lo stesso spazio dove, nonostante non manchino frecciate e affondi verbali, raramente si alza voce.

Pubblicato in: Cina, Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Unione Europea. Per fortuna esistono i cinesi.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-03-12.

Golfo Finlandia

Basta una semplice occhiata alla carta geografica per comprendere l’utilità di un tunnel sottomarino che colleghi Helsinki a Tallinn.

Se è vero che le navi traghetto sono efficienti, sarebbe altrettanto vero che abbattere i tempi di transito e rendere ininfluenti i fattori meteorologici sia un beneficio non da poco.

Poi, anche considerazioni di più largo respiro.

Le attuali linee ferroviarie che collegano Estonia alla Finlandia passano per il territorio russo. Il vicinato è ottimo a cordiale, ma fare il periplo del Golfo di Finlandia prende almeno una giornata.

«Da Helsinki a Tallinn in 20 minuti, massimo mezz’ora, grazie a un tunnel ferroviario sottomarino ad alta velocità finanziato dai cinesi»

*

«Passa ancora una volta da Pechino e dalla sua Nuova via della seta uno dei più ambiziosi progetti infrastrutturali europei, che ha ricevuto una prima investitura formale: un memorandum di intesa tra la FinEst Bay Area Development, la società preposta alla realizzazione del tunnel, e la cinese Touchstone Capital, che si è detta pronta a coprire una parte sostanziale del costo del progetto con un finanziamento da 15 miliardi di euro, restandone poi socia di minoranza»

*

«Del tunnel da cento chilometri, destinato ad essere il più lungo del mondo, Finlandia ed Estonia parlano già da anni»

*

«Passando sotto il Golfo di Finlandia infatti, non solo taglierebbe nettamente i tempi di collegamento via mare tra le due capitali – oggi compresi tra un’ora e mezza e le due ore e mezza, a seconda del periodo dell’anno – ma ridurrebbe anche la pressione sul Porto di Helsinki»

*

«Il progetto è però strategico anche per la Belt and Road Initiative di Pechino, che mira a unire la Cina via mare o via terra all’Asia sud-orientale e centrale, al Medio Oriente, all’Europa e all’Africa»

* * * * * * *

Se è vero che l’Unione Europea sta finanziando in parte la rete tav per collegare gli stati baltici all’Europa continentale, sarebbe altrettanto vero ricordarsi che anche la penisola scandinava fa parte dell’Europa.

Sorge allora spontanea una domanda.

All’Unione Europea mancavano proprio i quindici miliardi di questa grande opera, quando ne spende quattro volte tento per i migranti?


→ Sole 24 Ore. 2019-03-09. Miliardi cinesi per la Tav del Baltico: da Helsinki a Tallinn in 20 minuti

Da Helsinki a Tallinn in 20 minuti, massimo mezz’ora, grazie a un tunnel ferroviario sottomarino ad alta velocità finanziato dai cinesi. Passa ancora una volta da Pechino e dalla sua Nuova via della seta uno dei più ambiziosi progetti infrastrutturali europei, che ha ricevuto una prima investitura formale: un memorandum di intesa tra la FinEst Bay Area Development, la società preposta alla realizzazione del tunnel, e la cinese Touchstone Capital, che si è detta pronta a coprire una parte sostanziale del costo del progetto con un finanziamento da 15 miliardi di euro, restandone poi socia di minoranza.

Il tunnel più lungo del mondo

Del tunnel da cento chilometri, destinato ad essere il più lungo del mondo, Finlandia ed Estonia parlano già da anni. Passando sotto il Golfo di Finlandia infatti, non solo taglierebbe nettamente i tempi di collegamento via mare tra le due capitali – oggi compresi tra un’ora e mezza e le due ore e mezza, a seconda del periodo dell’anno – ma ridurrebbe anche la pressione sul Porto di Helsinki, il più affollato d’Europa nel 2017, con oltre 12 milioni di passeggeri all’anno, la maggior parte diretti a Tallinn (i pendolari diretti dall’Estonia alla Finlandia sono decine di migliaia ogni settimana), senza contare il traffico merci.

Un altro tassello della Nuova via della seta

Il progetto è però strategico anche per la Belt and Road Initiative di Pechino, che mira a unire la Cina via mare o via terra all’Asia sud-orientale e centrale, al Medio Oriente, all’Europa e all’Africa: si potrebbe collegare infatti a Rail Baltica importante arteria ad alta velocità, finanziata in gran parte dalla Ue e destinata a unire Paesi Baltici e Polonia, integrando le tre repubbliche nella rete ferroviaria europea (la data prevista per il completamento di questo progetto, avviato nel 2010, è il 2026).

«Ora che la questione dei finanziamenti è risolta possiamo procedere» ha dichiarato Peter Vesterbacka, l’imprenditore finladese leader del progetto, ex ad di Rovio Entertainment, l’azienda di videogiochi nota per Angry Birds. I governi di Estonia e Finlandia, che avevano concluso nei mesi scorsi uno studio di fattibilità, stimavano il 2040 come data di possibile apertura del tunnel, ma Vesterbacka è convinto che si possa costruire entro la fine del 2024. Bisognerà comunque attendere il via libera dei governi e dell’Unione europea.

Gioiello ingegneristico

Il tunnel FinEst (come è stato per ora battezzato con una crasi tra i nomi dei due Paesi, Finaldia-Estonia) si presenta nelle ambizioni dei progettisti come un gioiello ingegneristico: due gallerie lunghe 103 chilometri destinate a treni ad alta velocità, una profondità massima di 200 metri e una cablatura che garantisca internet ad alta velocità, un’isola artificiale. Il prezzo stimato per un viaggio di sola andata è 50 euro.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Finlandia. Governo Sipila dimissionario. Elezioni il 14 aprile.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-03-09.

2019-03-09__Finlandia__001

«The changes were crucial to the three-party governing coalition’s plan to balance public finances.

Financial constraints are colliding with the healthcare costs imposed by Finland’s fast-ageing population. But cutting those costs is a major political obstacle in a Nordic country that historically has provided an extensive — and expensive — healthcare system.»

Il welfare costa, e costa anche molto: ma se lo possono permettere solo coloro che hanno denaro a sufficienza, ma la situazione economica finlandese non è certo brillante. Un giorno o l’altro, con le buone oppure con le cattive, dovranno ridurlo, ed anche in modo consistente.

* * *

Finlandia, dimissioni per il governo Sipila. Elezioni politiche il 14 aprile

«Finlandia: si dimette il governo di centrodestra per la mancata approvazione delle riforme sanitarie

 Momento politico complesso anche nel Nord Europa. Il premier finlandese, Juha Sipila, ha presentato le dimissioni del suo governo di centrodestra dopo la mancata approvazione di un pacchetto di riforme sociali e sanitarie. Lo ha reso noto la presidenza del Paese scandinavo.

Elezioni FInlandia il 14 aprile

“Il primo ministro ha presentato le dimissioni del governo alle 10 (orario francese) di oggi”, ha chiarito la presidenza. Le dimissioni arrivano a sole cinque settimane dalle elezioni legislative, in programma il prossimo 14 aprile.»

*


Reuters. 2019-03-08. Finland’s government resigns after healthcare reform fails

Finland’s government resigned on Friday after ditching plans to reform the healthcare system, a key policy, the Finnish president’s office said, throwing the country into political limbo.

The president approved Prime Minister Juha Sipila’s resignation and asked his government to continue as a care-taker government until a new cabinet has been appointed.

The collapse of the government comes just one month before parliamentary elections are due, after Sipila failed to push through the reforms. The changes were crucial to the three-party governing coalition’s plan to balance public finances.

Financial constraints are colliding with the healthcare costs imposed by Finland’s fast-ageing population. But cutting those costs is a major political obstacle in a Nordic country that historically has provided an extensive — and expensive — healthcare system.

Sipila resigned “because the healthcare reform cannot be accomplished during this government term,” Antti Kaikkonen, the head of Sipila’s Centre Party’s parliamentary group, wrote on Twitter. Several governments have tried to push through reforms in different forms over the past 12 years.

“Since elections were already set for 14 April, the resignation of the government is not a big deal at all at this point. Still, it does create some ugly headlines,” Nordea’s chief analyst wrote on Twitter.

According to the government, the reform could have curbed the annual growth of Finland’s public social and healthcare expenses to 0.9 percent from the current estimate of 2.4 percent between 2019 and 2029.

Sipila had previously said he would dissolve his centre-right coalition government if it failed to push through its healthcare and local government reform.

* * * * * * *

La situazione politica finlandese ricalca quella di quasi tutte le nazioni europee: si assiste ad una proliferazione di piccoli partiti, nove quelli con percentuali di voto superiori al 2%. Elemento caratteristico di queste formazioni è un elevato tasso di litigiosità virtualmente su tutto. La mancata approvazione della riforma del welfare è un severo empasse, sopratutto perché la sua stesura era stata concordata tra i partiti della coalizione dimissionaria.

Sempre che non accadano fatti nuovi e rilevanti, le nuove elezioni sembrerebbero non essere foriere di un qualche cambiamento.

Nelle passate elezioni presidenziali del 28 gennaio 2018 era stato eletto Mr Sauli Ninisto, un indipendente di centro destra, con il 62.7% dei voti validi.

* * *

Da tempo si vocifera di un blocco politico nordico. Nulla da eccepire, l’idea avrebbe uno logico substrato.

Ma sia Svezia sia Finlandia versano in paludi politiche, nelle quali sembrerebbero essersi impantanate.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Ideologia liberal, Senza categoria

Finlandia. Archiviato il reddito di cittadinanza.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-12-30.

Helsinky. Finlandia. La Cattedrale.

«Chi non vuol lavorare neppure mangi.» San Paolo, Ts2, 3, 10.


«A Helsinki il governo di Juha Sipilä ha lanciato nel 2017 un esperimento biennale, affidandolo all’Istituto nazionale di previdenza sociale Kela. Non si tratta, a essere precisi, di un vero reddito per tutti.»

*

«È stato infatti selezionato un campione di 2mila persone disoccupate tra i 25 e i 58 anni alle quali, grazie a uno stanziamento di 20 milioni di euro, è stato garantito un assegno mensile di 560 euro (non tassati) per due anni, anche nel caso in cui – nel biennio in questione – avessero trovato lavoro. Proprio questa mancanza di vincoli, a differenza di altre provvidenze destinate ai disoccupati, è l’elemento più innovativo dell’esperimento, che mira a giudicare l’efficacia del reddito di base universale ai fini del reinserimento nel mercato del lavoro.»

*

«la decisione del governo di non prolungare il test oltre la fine di quest’anno è stata interpretata da alcuni come una prima bocciatura»

*

«Ma il reddito di base aiuta effettivamente il reinserimento nel mondo del lavoro o incoraggia la pigrizia?»

* * * * * * * *

Distinguiamo innanzitutto i comportamenti da tenersi nei momenti di crisi ovvero di emergenza, da quelli da gestire nei tempi ordinari. La duttilità di pensiero è cosa di buon senso.

Poniamoci la domanda di cosa serva lo stato.

È del tutto evidente come le attese possano variare nel tempo: ciò che sia utile oggi potrebbe non esserlo domani, e viceversa. Questa considerazione intacca alla radice il concetto giuridico del diritto precostituito. I nobili dell’Ancien Régime godevano di diritti precostituiti legalmente ineccepibili: tanto indiscutibili che furono recisi da un colpo di ghigliottina: morto il beneficiario veniva a meno il beneficio. Rimedio drastico, ma almeno definitivo.

In linea generale, lo stato dovrebbe garantire ai cittadini pace, sicurezza e possibilità di lavorare.

Interni, finanze, esteri e difesa dovrebbero essere i suoi compiti.

Tutto il resto è un costo cui si farà fronte con imposte e tasse: in poche parole saranno benefici che i cittadini pagheranno diventando Contribuenti.

Ma se alla fine delle fini lo stato non fa altro che spendere il denaro ottenuto dai Contribuenti, non si vede motivo logico per cui possano aver peso politico anche persone che Contribuenti non sono.

Ci si pensi su con calma e, possibilmente, senza pregiudizi.

Lo stato dovrebbe erogare assistenza solo in situazioni emergenziali: malattie, perdita del lavoro, pubbliche calamità, etc, ma tutto questo per tempi definiti. Lo stato non dovrebbe essere per sua natura assistenziale: gli competono gli investimenti struturali: argini, strade, ponti, etc.

Il suffragio universale da voce politica a persone che in nulla contribuiscono al mantenimento dello stato stesso. Poi, sarà compito del governo far sì che tutti posano vivere dignitosamente, e se qualcuno stesse meglio degli altri sarebbe anche cosa benvenuta. Ma la vera assistenza consiste nel rendere possibile che tutti possano lavorare e mantenersi.

*

Prendiamo atto come in Finlandia sia cessata la sperimentazione del reddito di cittadinanza.

Quello che la logica avrebbe potuto precedere facilmente è stato imparato essendo maestra la durissima realtà dei fatti.


Sole 24 Ore. 2018-12-29. La Finlandia archivia il reddito di base universale

Mentre in Italia il reddito di cittadinanza, bandiera del Movimento 5 Stelle, è ancora oggetto di dibattito e rimodulazioni, in Finlandia arriveranno a febbraio le prime valutazioni ufficiali sul reddito di base universale sperimentato in questi due anni. Si tratta dell’esperimento più moderno, ampio e articolato di un’idea – quella di un sostegno per tutti – che affonda le sue radici nella storia, negli scritti sul diritto alla terra del politologo americano Thomas Paine di oltre due secoli fa.

Erano gli anni immediatamente successivi alla Guerra d’indipendenza americana e alla Rivoluzione francese e si trattava di una sorta di declinazione pratica del concetto di diritti umani universali, esaltato da quelle rivoluzioni.

A Helsinki il governo di Juha Sipilä ha lanciato nel 2017 un esperimento biennale, affidandolo all’Istituto nazionale di previdenza sociale Kela. Non si tratta, a essere precisi, di un vero reddito per tutti. È stato infatti selezionato un campione di 2mila persone disoccupate tra i 25 e i 58 anni alle quali, grazie a uno stanziamento di 20 milioni di euro, è stato garantito un assegno mensile di 560 euro (non tassati) per due anni, anche nel caso in cui – nel biennio in questione – avessero trovato lavoro. Proprio questa mancanza di vincoli, a differenza di altre provvidenze destinate ai disoccupati, è l’elemento più innovativo dell’esperimento, che mira a giudicare l’efficacia del reddito di base universale ai fini del reinserimento nel mercato del lavoro.

Avere anticipazioni ufficiali è impossibile, anche se la decisione del governo di non prolungare il test oltre la fine di quest’anno è stata interpretata da alcuni come una prima bocciatura. «Non abbiamo risultati – taglia corto Olli Kangas, capo del Dipartimento di ricerca del Kela e referente scientifico del progetto – i primi arriveranno alla fine di febbraio». Quello che invece il professor Kangas spiega è come la valutazione sarà effettuata: «Verificheremo prima di tutto se le persone inserite nel campione lavorano o no, ma siamo anche interessati alla questione più generale del loro benessere. Ci interessa inoltre vedere come la questione del reddito di base è stata trattata dai politici e dai media».

Qualche indicazione in più arriva da osservatori attenti come Ernesto Hartikainen, specialista senior in economia circolare del Sitra, il Fondo finlandese per l’innovazione. «I media – racconta – hanno intervistato alcuni beneficiari del reddito di base. Anche se si tratta di casi individuali e non di evidenze scientifiche ne è emerso un giudizio positivo sul fatto, per esempio, di non dover andare all’ufficio di collocamento per riempire moduli. Il mio punto di vista è, in effetti, che la gente abbia in questo modo più tempo da dedicare alla ricerca del lavoro o alla formazione anziché agli adempimenti burocratici».

Ma il reddito di base aiuta effettivamente il reinserimento nel mondo del lavoro o incoraggia la pigrizia? «È uno degli aspetti in discussione – spiega ancora Hartikainen – ma io credo che bisognerebbe porsi anche un’altra domanda, legata a una delle ragioni principali della sperimentazione in Finlandia: il reddito di base aumenta il benessere? Dobbiamo anche chiederci cosa si intende per “pigro”: parliamo di un individuo che non ha un lavoro retribuito o che è passivo e non fa niente? Perché il reddito universale di base consente, per esempio, di lavorare anche se la prestazione non è pagata o è sottopagata».

Il vero nodo dell’esperimento finlandese e di qualunque analoga sperimentazione è in realtà prima di tutto economico: capire se e come si concilia un reddito davvero universale con le esigenze di bilancio. Per Olli Kangas «molto dipende dalle politiche fiscali, ossia dalla capacità di spostare risorse dalle fasce più ricche al reddito di base», oltre che dalle dinamiche comportamentali innescate, se cioè «la gente si impigrisce o diventa più attiva e imprenditoriale». Secondo Ernesto Hartikainen «bisogna considerare anche il Paese: la Finlandia destina già molte risorse al Welfare e una delle idee alla base della sperimentazione è che il reddito universale di base possa essere meno costoso di un sistema più burocratico. Inoltre si devono considerare i costi sociali negativi di un aumento della disoccupazione, dei sussidi, della criminalità: l’alternativa potrebbe in definitiva essere più dispendiosa del costo diretto del reddito di base universale».

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Senza categoria, Unione Europea

Repubbliche Baltiche. Sondaggi Elettorali.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-08-07.

Stati del Nord Europa

Si faccia grande attenzione.

Nell’attuale Unione Europea il principale centro direzionale politico è il Consiglio Europeo, ossia il consesso dei capi di stato o di governo dei paesi afferenti l’Unione.

Il tale organo contano in modo ponderato le teste ed il peso delle relative popolazioni, ma in molte situazioni conta il numero degli stati che hanno votato a favore oppure contro.

In questa ottica diventa evidente come anche paesi minuscoli come quelli baltici possano svolgere ruoli fondamentali.

*

In linea generale possiamo constatare come anche in questi paesi i partiti di ispirazione liberal e socialista siano in regresso, seppure meno rispetto l’Europa continentale. Nel contempo i partiti di ispirazione ‘populista‘ o ‘sovranista‘ stanno crescendo nelle propensioni di voto.

Sembrerebbero essere variazioni del quadro politico che non dovrebbero condurre a vistosi ribaltamenti dei governi, ma in ogni caso dovrebbero esser di entità tale da condizionarne severamente il comportamento.

Il Termometro Politico è uscito con il seguente Report.

Sondaggi elettorali Europa: le intenzioni di voto nei Paesi del Nord

Svezia e Lettonia si preparano a tornare alle urne, mentre nel 2019 toccherà a Finlandia, Danimarca ed Estonia. Scopriamo quale è ad oggi lo scenario nei Paesi del Nord Europa, con una rapida carrellata delle intenzioni di voto in base all’analisi dei sondaggi elettorali condotti dai principali istituti demoscopici dei Paesi presi in esame.

Sondaggi elettorali Europa: le intenzioni di voto in Svezia.

La Svezia sarà il primo dei Paesi scandinavi a tornare al voto, previsto per il 9 settembre 2018. Il Partito Socialdemocratico (SAP) del premier uscente Stefan Löfven è in netto calo ma resta la formazione di maggioranza relativa per quasi tutti gli istituti demoscopici, con un consenso medio del 24% (+7% rispetto al 2014). In calo anche i Verdi (MP), partner di minoranza del governo. Con il 4% attuale, registrano un arretramento di circa 3 punti rispetto alle ultime elezioni e si trovano al limite della soglia di sbarramento. Va meglio al Partito della Sinistra (V), che appoggia dall’esterno l’esecutivo di minoranza Löfven: passerebbe dal 5.7% di 4 anni fa al 9% attuale.

Luci ed ombre anche per l’Alleanza per la Svezia, la coalizione conservatrice all’opposizione del governo Löfven guidata dal Partito Moderato (M), accreditato del 20% ed in calo di circa 3 punti rispetto alle ultime elezioni. Va meglio al Partito di Centro (C), con un consenso tra il 9-10% ed in crescita di 3-4 punti rispetto al 2014. Attorno al 5% il consenso dei Liberali, in leggero calo rispetto al 5.4% delle ultime elezioni. Sotto al 4% invece i Cristiano Democratici (KD), che rischiano di restare fuori dal Parlamento.

Il vero exploit elettorale potrebbe però essere registrato al di fuori delle due principali coalizioni. I Democratici Svedesi (SD), formazione euroscettica di destra, sono valutati attorno al 22%. Un vero boom per il partito guidato da Jimmie Åkesson: +10% rispetto al 2014 e la possibilità di eleggere oltre 80 parlamentari. Nettamente sotto la soglia di sbarramento invece Iniziativa Femminista (FI), partito di sinistra femminista dato attorno al 2%.

Sondaggi elettorali Europa: la Finlandia si avvicina al voto del 2019.

Le prossime elezioni in Finlandia si terranno nell’aprile 2019. I sondaggi al momento tratteggiano un testa a testa tra i socialdemocratici (SDP) e il Partito di Coalizione Nazionale (KOK), entrambi accreditati di circa il 20% ed in crescita rispettivamente di 4 e 2 punti rispetto al 2015. Dietro di loro il Partito di Centro (KESK) del premier uscente Juha Sipilä, che perde lo scettro di partito di maggioranza relativa ed arretra dal 21.1% delle ultime elezioni all’attuale 16%. La vera sorpresa rispetto al 2015 potrebbero essere però i Verdi (VIHR), valutati al 14% (+6% rispetto a 3 anni fa).

Dietro a questi 4 partiti valutati in doppia cifra c’è il partito populista euroscettico dei Veri Finlandesi (PS), in netta sofferenza dopo l’exploit elettorale del 2015 (17.7%). L’entrata nel governo Sipila ha portato il PS a dover scendere a compromessi, dovendo rinunciare a temi cari come la linea dura nei confronti della crisi greca. Un riposizionamento che ha provocato un’emorragia di consenso alla quale il PS ha reagito promuovendo Timo Soini alla leadership del partito nel giugno 2017.

La radicalizzazione del PS a guida Soini ha provocato la rottura con l’esecutivo Sipila (composto sino ad allora da KESK, KOK e PS) e la scissione dell’ala più moderata del partito, che ha dato origine ad una nuova formazione (SIN) volta a confermare il sostegno il governo. Tutto ciò sembra aver indebolito il consenso del PS, al momento accreditato del 9%, al pari dell’Alleanza di Sinistra (VAS). Va molto peggio invece al neonato SIN, valutato appena all’1%. Attorno al 4% invece sia i Cristiano Democratici (KD) che il Partito Popolare a sostegno della minoranza svedese della popolazione (SFP).

Sondaggi elettorali Europa: Danimarca, sfida all’ultimo seggio.

Anche la Danimarca tornerà alle urne nella prima metà del 2019. Le elezioni del 2015 hanno visto la vittoria di misura del cosiddetto “blocco azzurro” di centrodestra, con 90 seggi sui 179 totali. Ciò ha portato alla nascita di un monocolore liberale (Venstre), con l’appoggio esterno degli altri membri del blocco azzurro.

In un quadro così equilibrato, ogni minima variazione potrebbe rivelarsi decisiva. E al momento i sondaggi sembrano pronosticare un successo sul filo di lana del centrosinistra, segnalato in crescita di 2-3 punti rispetto al 2015. Una variazione che potrebbe portarli a strappare al blocco azzurro almeno 4-5 seggi e tornare alla guida del Paese. Per quanto riguarda le singoli formazioni, confermato il ruolo di partito di maggioranza relativa – e di leader del blocco rosso – per i Socialdemocratici, che restano stabili al 26%. Testa a testa invece nel centrodestra, con i Liberali (Venstre) del premier uscente Lars Løkke Rasmussen e la destra populista del Partito Popolare danese (DF) accreditati entrambi del 19-20%.

Sondaggi elettorali Europa: Norvegia ed Islanda, appuntamento al 2021.

Ben più distante il ritorno alle urne in Norvegia, previsto per il 2021. Il voto del novembre 2017 ha visto la conferma del governo di centrodestra, pur con una maggioranza più risicata (88 seggi su 169) rispetto alla legislatura precedente (96 seggi). Dieci mesi dopo, la situazione non sembra particolarmente mutata, con il centrodestra accreditato di 88-89 seggi. La luna di miele sembra favorire i Conservatori (Høyre) del premier Erna Solberg, che oggi sarebbero il primo partito con il 27%, sorpassando i Laburisti (23%, 4 punti in meno del 2017).

Nel 2021 tornerà la voto anche l’Islanda. Le elezioni del novembre 2017 hanno visto la nascita del governo tripartito – che può contare sul sostegno di 35 dei 63 seggi del Parlamento – formato dalla Sinistra-Verde (VG), dal Partito dell’Indipendenza e dal Partito Progressista (FSF). Stando alle ultime rilevazioni, gli euroscettici del Partito dell’Indipendenza si confermano ampiamente il partito di maggioranza, mantenendosi nettamente sopra il 20%. In calo invece gli altri partner di governo. VG del premier Katrín Jakobsdóttir è stimato all’11-12% (rispetto al 16.9 delle ultime elezioni). Attorno al 9% il consenso di FSF, in calo di un paio di punti. In crescita le opposizioni, con i socialdemocratici attorno al 15% (+3%) e il Partito Pirata al 13-14% (+4-5%).

Sondaggi elettorali Europa: le intenzioni di voto nelle repubbliche baltiche.

La Lettonia sarà la prima delle tre repubbliche baltiche a tornare al voto, previsto per il prossimo autunno. I pochi sondaggi in circolazione sembrano prevedere un’ulteriore crescita dei Socialdemocratici (SDPS), già partito di maggioranza relativa nel 2014 con il 23%. A registrare un passo avanti potrebbe essere anche il blocco dei conservatori ecologisti agrari (ZZS) del premier Māris Kučinskis (21.9% nel 2014). In netto calo sembrerebbero invece sia la destra populista di Alleanza Nazionale, che i conservatori-liberali di Unità (rispettivamente 16.6 e 21.9% alle ultime elezioni). A ciò fa da contraltare la probabile crescita della destra europeista ed anticorruzione JKP. Che sembra in grado di superare agevolmente la soglia di sbarramento del 5% (dopo lo 0.9% raccolto 4 anni fa).

Il prossimo anno tornerà al voto anche l’Estonia, dopo le elezioni del marzo 2015 che hanno visto la conferma del Partito Riformatore Estone come formazione di maggioranza relativa. Nonostante il voto di sfiducia al governo Roivas e il passaggio all’opposizione, il partito resta in testa ai sondaggi con circa il 30% dei consensi, in crescita di un paio di punti rispetto al 2015. A seguire il Partito di Centro del premier uscente Juri Ratas, stabile al 25%. In affanno sia i Socialdemocratici (SDE) che i conservatori di Pro Patria (IRL), entrambi al governo prima con Roivas e poi con Ratas. Un “ribaltone” che evidentemente potrebbe non essere premiato dagli elettori, con un calo di consensi stimato rispettivamente del 5 e 7%. In netta crescita invece i nazionalisti euroscettici EKRE, che ad oggi passerebbero dall’8 al 17%.

Mancano ancora 2 anni al ritorno alle urne in Lituania, previsto per l’autunno 2020. Il testa a testa andato in scena nel 2016 tra l’Unione dei Contadini e verdi (LVŽS) e i Democratici cristiani (TS-KD) ad oggi si risolverebbe a favore di questi ultimi, dati al 25% (contro il 23% di LVŽS). Divisa la sinistra, a seguito della scissione all’interno dei socialdemocratici (LSDP) con la conseguente nascita del partito socialdemocratico del lavoro (LSDDP). Entrambi i partiti sono accreditati attualmente dell’8%, complessivamente più del 14.4% registrato dall’LSDP nel 2016. L’ondata euroscettica e populista non risparmia nemmeno la Lituania, con il partito Ordine e Giustizia (PTT) dato al 10%, il doppio rispetto a 2 anni fa.