Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo

Norvegia. Elezioni13 settembre. Sondaggi. La sinistra dovrebbe tornare al potere.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-08-13.

Gufo_019__

Il 13 settembre si terranno in Norvegia le elezioni politiche.

I conservatori ed i partiti più piccoli del centro-destra sembrano destinati a vincere 55 seggi nell’assemblea di 169 membri, in calo da 88, mentre il centro-sinistra potrebbe crescere fino a 114 da 81. L’Assemblea ha 169 membri.

* * * * * * *

«Norway’s centre-left opposition parties are expected to defeat the incumbent Conservative-led coalition government by a two-to-one margin in next month’s election for parliament»

«The Sept. 13 vote could thus end Prime Minister Erna Solberg’s quest for a third consecutive term and instead give Labour Party leader Jonas Gahr Stoere a chance to negotiate a power-sharing agreement with left-leaning groups»

«Widely praised last year for a swift coronavirus lockdown, giving Norway one of Europe’s lowest COVID-19 mortality rates, Solberg nevertheless faces a backlash over economic inequality and public sector reforms that have proven unpopular»

«The Conservatives and smaller parties on the centre-right look set to win 55 seats in the 169-member assembly, down from 88, while the centre-left could grow to 114 from 81»

«Labour promises tax relief for low and middle income families, an end to privatisation of public services, more money for hospitals and a tax hike on the top 20% of incomes»

«Norway’s Green Party is also set to boost its presence in parliament, as is the far-left Red, and both will seek to influence a Labour-led government»

* * * * * * *

I risultati di queste prospezioni elettorali sembrerebbero essere troppo tranchant per essere poi smentiti da quelli elettorali.

Tuttavia non neghiamo che leggiamo i risultati dei sondaggi elettorali con grande cura e distacco.

* * * * * * *


Norway government faces big defeat in Sept election, poll shows

Oslo, Aug 10 (Reuters) – Norway’s centre-left opposition parties are expected to defeat the incumbent Conservative-led coalition government by a two-to-one margin in next month’s election for parliament, a new opinion poll showed on Tuesday.

The Sept. 13 vote could thus end Prime Minister Erna Solberg’s quest for a third consecutive term and instead give Labour Party leader Jonas Gahr Stoere a chance to negotiate a power-sharing agreement with left-leaning groups.

Widely praised last year for a swift coronavirus lockdown, giving Norway one of Europe’s lowest COVID-19 mortality rates, Solberg nevertheless faces a backlash over economic inequality and public sector reforms that have proven unpopular.

In April the prime minister was fined by police for breaking social distancing rules at her birthday gathering, further damaging her standing. read more

The Conservatives and smaller parties on the centre-right look set to win 55 seats in the 169-member assembly, down from 88, while the centre-left could grow to 114 from 81, the survey showed.

The Aug. 2-6 poll by the Kantar agency for independent TV2 comes just as the election campaign kicks off and confirms a downwards trend shown in earlier polls.

Campaigning on a slogan that it is now the “common people’s turn”, Labour promises tax relief for low and middle income families, an end to privatisation of public services, more money for hospitals and a tax hike on the top 20% of incomes.

Norway’s Green Party is also set to boost its presence in parliament, as is the far-left Red, and both will seek to influence a Labour-led government.

Adding to the complexity, Centre leader Trygve Slagsvold Vedum has declared himself a candidate for prime minister, rivalling Stoere, although his party now polls around 16%, lagging Labour’s 23.5%.

A growing rural-urban divide, in which many voters objected to the reorganisation of police, healthcare and municipalities, in many cases centralising key functions, has been a boost for Vedum, who got just 10.3% in 2017.

Pubblicato in: Brasile, Devoluzione socialismo

Brasile. Elezioni politiche. Bolsonaro sembrerebbe essere favorito.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-01-23.

Brasile. Minas Gerais 002

A novembre la produzione industriale del Brasile evidenziava un +2.8% anno su anno.

Brasile. Il sistema economico sembrerebbe essere in netta ripresa.

Brasile. Adesso è il terzo fornitore della Cina di petrolio.

Brasile. Bolsonaro nomina Kassio Nunes alla Suprema Corte.

Brasile. Bolsonaro sale molto nei sondaggi. Liberal angustiati e tormentati.

Brasile. Jair Bolsonaro. Datafolha. Popolarità mai così alta al 37%, Consenso 47%.

Brasile. Giugno. PMI in crescita, ma ancora in fascia di contrazione.

Brasile. Archiviati decenni di socialismo si avvia alla rinascita economia.

Tra un mese si terranno in Brasile le elezioni politiche e le formazioni del Presidente Jair Bolsonaro sembrerebbero essere favorite.

«This is the beginning of Brazil’s liberation from socialism, political correctness and a bloated state»

2020-11-07__ Pil ppa 013

* * * * * * *

«Despite a deep recession and the world’s second-deadliest COVID-19 outbreak, candidates backed by Brazil’s right-wing president Jair Bolsonaro are expected to win control of Congress next month, politicians and analysts said on Monday»

«Bolsonaro is openly supporting center-right Congressman Arthur Lira for speaker of the lower chamber against centrist Baleia Rossi, who has the backing of current Speaker Rodrigo Maia and lawmakers keeping their distance from the president»

«Lira, who cast himself as fiscally conservative in a written exchange with Reuters, has more than the 257-vote majority needed »

«Yet polls show Bolsonaro has retained public support in the crisis, with 37% of those polled calling him a “good” or “great” president»

«His favored candidate in the Senate, Rodrigo Pacheco of the Democrats party, has a clear lead to become president of the Senate, by 46 senators to 33 for his rival Simone Tebet»

* * * * * * *

«This is the beginning of Brazil’s liberation from socialism, political correctness and a bloated state»

Un mese passa rapidamente.

*


Bolsonaro allies set to win control of Brazil’s Congress.

Despite a deep recession and the world’s second-deadliest COVID-19 outbreak, candidates backed by Brazil’s right-wing president Jair Bolsonaro are expected to win control of Congress next month, politicians and analysts said on Monday.

Bolsonaro is openly supporting center-right Congressman Arthur Lira for speaker of the lower chamber against centrist Baleia Rossi, who has the backing of current Speaker Rodrigo Maia and lawmakers keeping their distance from the president.

Lira, who cast himself as fiscally conservative in a written exchange with Reuters, has more than the 257-vote majority needed, according to risk consultancy Arko. That means an uphill battle for Rossi and the left-wing parties he is courting, which favor more help for low-income Brazilians hurt by the pandemic.

With more than 8.5 million confirmed COVID-19 cases and over 209,000 deaths – second only to the United States – the second wave of Brazil’s outbreak is likely to raise pressure on the government to spend more, widening its huge budget deficit.

Hospitals in the jungle city of Manaus are overwhelmed again, prompting pot-banging protests in Brazil’s largest cities over the handling of the pandemic by Bolsonaro, who has repeatedly denied the gravity of the virus.

On the economic front, Ford Motor Co announced last week it was shutting production in Brazil and cutting about 5,000 jobs, in a symbolic blow for a country that likely suffered its worst recession on record in 2020.

Yet polls show Bolsonaro has retained public support in the crisis, with 37% of those polled calling him a “good” or “great” president in both August and December surveys by pollster Datafolha. That solid support, along with a growing willingness to discuss traditional horse-trading in Congress, have helped him secure a political base of center-right lawmakers.

His favored candidate in the Senate, Rodrigo Pacheco of the Democrats party, has a clear lead to become president of the Senate, by 46 senators to 33 for his rival Simone Tebet, according to Arko.

Pacheco even has the backing of the leftist Workers Party (PT) that see him opposing Bolsonaro’s more controversial views such as easing gun ownership rules and denying climate change.

“Pacheco is not an extreme free-market exponent and would not agree to the blanket privatization of state companies,” PT Senator Jean Paul Prates said in a telephone interview.

Lira has said his priority if elected speaker of the lower house on Feb. 1 was an emergency bill that would give the federal and local governments more room to handle spending but avoid then breaching Brazil’s legally mandated spending cap.

He told Reuters, however, that Congress had to find an alternative to extending last year’s emergency transfers to low-income Brazilians that cost 322 billion reais ($61 billion) and blew a record hole in the government’s finances.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo

Italia. Riforma elettorale. Elezioni. Possibili scenari.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2020-07-14.

2020-07-12__Sondaggio 013

«dal 27 luglio alla Camera si tornerà a discutere di legge elettorale»

«il 20 e 21 settembre gli italiani saranno chiamati ad esprimersi sul taglio dei parlamentari nel referendum costituzionale confermativo»

«Con la soglia del 3% Calenda entrerebbe in Parlamento, Renzi no»

«Abbiamo simulato la distribuzione dei seggi di Camera e Senato a partire dai sondaggi elettorali realizzati dal 2 maggio al 9 luglio per un numero complessivo di circa 25.000 interviste, ponderate sulla base dei dati delle intenzioni di voto più recenti che fanno registrare la seguente graduatoria: Lega (25,5%), Pd (20%), M5S (18,1%), FdI (16,4%), FI (7,7%), Azione (3%).»

«Il primo scenario prende in considerazione la legge elettorale attuale e un’offerta politica con le coalizioni di centrodestra e centrosinistra e il M5S che si presenta da solo …. Il centrodestra avrebbe una maggioranza schiacciante sia alla Camera, sia al Senato, ottenendo rispettivamente 391 deputati e 201 senatori»

«Il secondo scenario prevede il voto con il Rosatellum e un’alleanza tra centrosinistra e M5S. Anche in questo caso il centrodestra si affermerebbe, ma con un vantaggio più contenuto: 339 seggi a 285 alla Camera e 174 a 136 al Senato»

«Il terzo scenario prevede l’adozione del Germanicum, quindi un sistema proporzionale puro, con la soglia di sbarramento al 5% nazionale o il 15% in una regione e la riduzione dei parlamentari…. Forza Italia sarebbe decisiva nella formazione di un governo, dato che Lega e FdI nell’insieme raggiungerebbero 191 seggi alla Camera e 94 al Senato, quindi meno dei 201 e 101 seggi che rappresentano la maggioranza delle nuove Camere»

«L’ultimo scenario ipotizza il Germanicum con l’abbassamento della soglia di sbarramento al 3% nazionale (mantenendo quella del 15% in una regione): al momento solamente Azione di Carlo Calenda è accreditata del 3%, ma il quadro complessivo non cambierebbe: la maggioranza andrebbe a Lega, FdI e FI»

* * * * * * *

Se il centrodestra restasse unito andrebbe meglio con il Rosatellum, ma vincerebbe anche con il Germanicum.

Al momento attuale il centrosinistra sembrerebbe non poter ottenere i numeri per formare una maggioranza.

Un rebus è cosa voglia fare Renzi.

Se appoggiasse il Germanicum con le soglie, sarebbe estromesso dal parlamento. Che si unisca ad una coalizione sarebbe possibile, ma al momento poco probabile.

Se volesse cercare di sopravvivere, dovrebbe determinare una crisi di governo: visto che in ogni caso il centrodestra subentrerebbe al governo, potrebbe essere meglio avere qualche deputato e senatore che nessuno.

*


Sondaggi, oggi il centrodestra vincerebbe le elezioni. Ma con il proporzionale decisiva FI

Con l’attuale Rosatellum la coalizione staccherebbe Pd e M5S. Nel proporzionale, previsto dal sistema Germanicum, il partito di Berlusconi sarebbe l’ago della bilancia. Con la soglia del 3% Calenda entrerebbe in Parlamento, Renzi no.

Sono trascorsi poco più di due anni dalle elezioni politiche del 2018, non siamo ancora giunti a metà della legislatura, eppure sembra trascorsa un’eternità. I rapporti di forza tra i partiti sono profondamente cambiati, basti pensare all’esito delle elezioni europee dello scorso anno e ai successivi andamenti delle intenzioni di voto misurate dai sondaggi, soprattutto dopo il cambio della maggioranza di governo dell’estate scorsa e con l’impatto dell’emergenza sanitaria sul clima sociale. Inoltre, la composizione del Parlamento è oggi diversa da quella uscita dalle elezioni a seguito della formazione di nuovi soggetti politici e del «cambio di casacca» di diversi parlamentari.

Nel dibattito attuale spesso si evoca l’ipotesi di nuove elezioni, ipotesi che presenta due incognite di non poco conto: la legge elettorale e la composizione del Parlamento. Infatti, dal 27 luglio alla Camera si tornerà a discutere di legge elettorale e il 20 e 21 settembre gli italiani saranno chiamati ad esprimersi sul taglio dei parlamentari nel referendum costituzionale confermativo. Se venisse approvata la riforma costituzionale, la Camera perderebbe 230 deputati e il Senato 115 senatori. E se venisse introdotta la legge elettorale denominata Germanicum, si passerebbe a un sistema proporzionale puro, venendo meno la quota maggioritaria prevista dal Rosatellum. Quale Parlamento potremmo avere nei diversi scenari? Abbiamo simulato la distribuzione dei seggi di Camera e Senato a partire dai sondaggi elettorali realizzati dal 2 maggio al 9 luglio per un numero complessivo di circa 25.000 interviste, ponderate sulla base dei dati delle intenzioni di voto più recenti che fanno registrare la seguente graduatoria: Lega (25,5%), Pd (20%), M5S (18,1%), FdI (16,4%), FI (7,7%), Azione (3%). In tutti gli scenari considerati, il voto all’estero è stato stimato a partire dai risultati ufficiali del 2018 simulando tendenze di voto analoghe a quelle rilevate oggi in Italia.

Il primo scenario prende in considerazione la legge elettorale attuale e un’offerta politica con le coalizioni di centrodestra e centrosinistra e il M5S che si presenta da solo. La distribuzione dei seggi per singolo partito della parte maggioritaria tiene conto degli attuali rapporti di forza tra i partiti alleati nelle due coalizioni. Il centrodestra avrebbe una maggioranza schiacciante sia alla Camera, sia al Senato, ottenendo rispettivamente 391 deputati e 201 senatori. Lega e FdI vedrebbero aumentare significativamente la loro presenza in Parlamento e teoricamente potrebbero ottenere la maggioranza rinunciando a Forza Italia, ma in tal caso si porrebbe un problema «politico», dato che verrebbe meno l’alleanza con cui si sono presentati alle elezioni (come peraltro già avvenuto con il governo gialloverde).

Il secondo scenario prevede il voto con il Rosatellum e un’alleanza tra centrosinistra e M5S. Anche in questo caso il centrodestra si affermerebbe, ma con un vantaggio più contenuto: 339 seggi a 285 alla Camera e 174 a 136 al Senato.

Il terzo scenario prevede l’adozione del Germanicum, quindi un sistema proporzionale puro, con la soglia di sbarramento al 5% nazionale o il 15% in una regione e la riduzione dei parlamentari. In questa ipotesi accederebbero in Parlamento solo 6 forze politiche. Forza Italia sarebbe decisiva nella formazione di un governo, dato che Lega e FdI nell’insieme raggiungerebbero 191 seggi alla Camera e 94 al Senato, quindi meno dei 201 e 101 seggi che rappresentano la maggioranza delle nuove Camere.

L’ultimo scenario ipotizza il Germanicum con l’abbassamento della soglia di sbarramento al 3% nazionale (mantenendo quella del 15% in una regione): al momento solamente Azione di Carlo Calenda è accreditata del 3%, ma il quadro complessivo non cambierebbe: la maggioranza andrebbe a Lega, FdI e FI.

Insomma, pur con tutte le cautele del caso — tenuto conto che incertezza / astensionismo e mobilità elettorale si mantengono molto elevate e si ignora l’offerta politica definitiva (è probabile che le forze minori si possano aggregare per superare le soglie) — il centrodestra è accreditato ad avere la maggioranza. Il Germanicum sembra attribuire il ruolo dell’ago della bilancia a Forza Italia che, nonostante il forte calo di consensi rispetto al 2018, potrebbe acquisire una nuova centralità negli scenari politici futuri. A conferma che i voti si pesano, non si contano. E la politica è sempre più l’arte del possibile, la scienza del relativo, come diceva von Bismarck, un germanico autentico.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Croazia. Elezioni politiche altamente incerte.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2020-07-05.

Crozia 029

La Croazia, Republika Hrvatska, è un piccolo stato di quattro milioni di abitanti, pil ppa procapite 29,421 Usd, dal 1° aprile 2009 membro della Nato e dal 1° luglio 2013 membro della Unione Europea. Non ha aderito all’euro ed ha come valuta la kuna croata.

Oggi si vota per rinnovare i 151 membri del parlamento, essendo 76 la maggioranza.

«Si potrà votare fino alle 19 per le elezioni politiche»

«Secondo le previsioni della Commissione europea, la recessione economica in Croazia sarà del 9,1% nel 2020»

«Ma in realtà i risultati appaiono deboli se confrontati con altri Paesi della regione, visto che nel periodo 2016-2019 il Pil croato ha accumulato una crescita del 9%, mentre quello della Romania è aumentato del 16,5% e quello della Slovenia, del 12%.»

«Secondo l’ultimo sondaggio della tv Nova, Hdz si appresta a vincere con 52 seggi e Restart se ne accaparra 51 (ma in un sondaggio di poco precedente la piattaforma progressista era avanti)»

«i negoziati post-elettorali sulla formazione del governo saranno molto difficili»

«Proprio perché nessuno dei due fronti ha la possibilità di conquistare la maggioranza dei 151 seggi in Parlamento, il Movimento patriottico potrebbe fare da ago della bilancia»

«È escluso che si alleai con Skoro l’Spd, che lo accusa di dichiarazioni sessiste»

«Potrebbe farlo invece l’Hdz come unica opzione per formare il prossimo governo. L’Hdz potrebbe formare una coalizione post-elettorale con il Movimento Patriottico»

* * * * * * *

È impossibile al momento preconizzare una tenuta dell’attuale governo ovvero il subentro della sinistra.

Di sicuro però la Croazia siede a pieno diritto in seno al Consiglio Europeo, ed il suo voto, così come il suo veto, possono essere determinanti in gran parte delle votazioni.

*


Croazia al voto. È testa a testa tra il premier Plenkovic e la piattaforma Restart

Si potrà votare fino alle 19 per le elezioni politiche. Risultato in bilico e nella sfida tra l’attuale capo del governo conservatore e il centrosinistra, potrebbe diventare l’ago della bilancia il cantante populista Skoro.

Seggi aperti dalle 7 alle 19 in Croazia, dove circa 3,85 milioni di croati sono chiamati ad eleggere i 151 deputati al Parlamento in una elezione legislativa che si tiene in un clima di preoccupazione per la ripresa dei di Covid-19 e il timore per la diffusione dell’epidemia potrebbe incidere sull’affluenza.

Nei sondaggi è testa a testa tra l’Unione democratica croata del premier conservatore, Andrej Plenkovic (Hdz), e la piattaforma di centro-sinistra, Restart, guidata dal leader socialdemocratico, Davor Bernardic ed è possibile che un popolare cantante populista, Miroslav Skoro, possa essere l’ago della bilancia nei futuri negoziati per il governo.

Sicuramente peseranno le circostanze straordinarie causate dall’epidemia da coronavirus e soprattutto la ripresa dei contagi. Finora la Croazia ha registrato circa 3.000 casi confermati e il bilancio delle vittime supera di poco il centinaio. Tra il 15 maggio e il 15 giugno, il numero di nuove infezioni giornaliere era praticamente zero. Tuttavia, nella seconda quindicina di giugno i contagi sono ripartiti, fino a un massimo di 95 casi registrati il 25 giugno. Il 2 luglio sono stati confermati 81 nuovi contagi.

Questo notevole picco ha coinciso con l’allentamento delle misure precauzionali e la campagna elettorale. Ma nel contempo c’è stata una riapertura del Paese al turismo straniero e la Croazia è stata presentata come una “meta Covid-free”. I conservatori al potere hanno deciso a maggio di convocare le elezioni per trarre vantaggio dalla vittoria sulla pandemia messa sotto controllo “grazie alla buona gestione”, e lo slogan della loro campagna è stato “Una Croazia sicura”; ma ora sembrano spiazzati dalla ripresa dei contagi.

Secondo le previsioni della Commissione europea, la recessione economica in Croazia sarà del 9,1% nel 2020. Ma in realtà i risultati appaiono deboli se confrontati con altri Paesi della regione, visto che nel periodo 2016-2019 il Pil croato ha accumulato una crescita del 9%, mentre quello della Romania è aumentato del 16,5% e quello della Slovenia, del 12%.

Inoltre, diversi scandali di corruzione hanno offuscato l’immagine del governo, al punto che -secondo l’Eurobarometro di giugno- la Croazia e’ il primo Paese Ue per percentuale dei cittadini che ritengono diffusa la corruzione nel loro Paese (il 97%). E Plenkovic ha defenestrato una decina di ministri negli ultimi quattro anni a causa di scandali o sospetti di corruzione.

Non solo: nelle ultime settimane sono aumentate le critiche al premier, che è stato molto attaccato per aver partecipato a un torneo di tennis due settimane fa a Zara, dove le precauzioni non sono state rispettate e ci sono stati alcuni contagi, tra cui Novak Djokovic, numero uno nel tennis mondiale. I media si sono riempiti con le immagini di Plenkovic che stringeva le mani e posava davanti ai fotografi con Djokovic. Nonostante ciò, il premier ha rifiutato di mettersi in isolamento.

“La scelta è semplice: corruzione, saccheggio e fascismo o la coalizione Restart per un nuovo inizio senza corruzione, ingiustizia e discriminazione”, è lo slogan della piattaforma di centrosinistra, riassunto in un messaggio elettorale. Ma il suo leader, Davor Bernardic, un fisico di 40 anni accusato di mancanza di esperienza e carisma, non è riuscito a mobilitare a suo favore l’elettorato insoddisfatto dell’attuale governo.

Ecco perché si preannuncia un testa-a-testa e i negoziati post-elettorali sulla formazione del governo saranno molto difficili. Secondo l’ultimo sondaggio della tv Nova, Hdz si appresta a vincere con 52 seggi e Restart se ne accaparra 51 (ma in un sondaggio di poco precedente la piattaforma progressista era avanti).

Proprio perché nessuno dei due fronti ha la possibilià di conquistare la maggioranza dei 151 seggi in Parlamento, il Movimento patriottico potrebbe fare da ago della bilancia. È escluso che si alleai con Skoro l’Spd, che lo accusa di dichiarazioni sessiste e di nostalgie per il passato ‘”ustasha”, il movimento filonazista croato durante la seconda guerra mondiale.

Potrebbe farlo invece l’Hdz come unica opzione per formare il prossimo governo. L’Hdz potrebbe formare una coalizione post-elettorale con il Movimento Patriottico e forse con l’estrema destra di Most (il primo dato a 18 seggi, il secondo a 9); Mozemo, la sinistra ecologista, si ferma a 6 eletti. Il motto del Movimento, che riunisce una decina di partiti di estrema destra, è “Voglio il mio”. E tra le canzoni più famose del popolarissimo cantante folk “Ne dirajte mi ravnicu” (“Non toccare la mia terra”) e Sude mi” (“Mi processano”) dedicata all’ex generale Ante Gotovina, prima condannato e poi assolto dal Tribunale penale internazionale per l’ex Jugoslavia per crimini contro l’umanità nei confronti della popolazione serba della Krajina durante l’operazione Tempesta nel luglio 1995.

E infatti la condizione del movimento per negoziare un governo con Hdz è che nella coalizione non entri il partito della minoranza serba (4,5% della popolazione), l’Sdss di Milorad Pupovac. Proprio parodiando gli attacchi ultranazionalisti contro Pupovac, l’Sdss ha fatto ricorso all’umorismo in un video intitolato “Pupi è colpevole di tutto”, in cui il docente universitario e leader del partito è accusato di tutto, anche delle cose piu’ ridicole: per esempio, aver cospirato a favore di una seconda ondata di Covid-19.  

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Senza categoria, Unione Europea

Romania. Elezioni politiche in autunno. Sondaggi elettorali.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2020-05-04.

2020-04-20__Romania Sondaggi 001

Questo autunno dovrebbero tenersi le elezioni politiche in Romania.

2020-04-20__Romania Sondaggi 002

La situazione rumena interessa l’Italia molto più di quanto possa sembrare a prima vista.

A seguito di tutti gli accadimenti che sono recentemente successi nell’Unione Europea, non da ultimo la crisi economica indotta dall’epidemia da coronavirus, il parlamento europeo ha perso molto del pregresso potere politico, essendosi il Consiglio Europeo riappropriato delle proprie prerogative di governo. Ma la Romania siede a pieno diritto nel Consiglio ed il suo voto può pesare anche molto in questo periodo travagliato.

La Romania si appresta infatti a voltare pagina.

Nelle elezioni dell’11 dicembre 2016 il partito socialista aveva ottenuto il 45.5% dei voti, e con essi il governo della nazione. Fu una conduzione travagliata: alle elezioni europee del 26 maggio 2019 il psd era crollato al 22.5%, superato al pnl con il 27.0%. Il 10 ottobre dello stesso anno il governo della socialista sig.ra Dăncilă si vide negare la fiducia parlamentare.

Molto ha pesato lo scandalo della Laura Codruta Kövesi, molto il malgoverno socialista.

Finalmente, il 10 marzo il parlamento ha accodato la fiducia a Ludovic Orban, del pnl.

Romania. Ludovic Orban riceve voto di fiducia e Iohannis dichiara l’emergenza.

Ma la Romania aveva compiuto anche grandi passi avanti dal punto di vista economico.

Romania. Pil anno su anno +4.4%.

Romania. Il Green Deal è una ‘true religion’. Il gesto del dito.

«The European Green Deal has been perceived as an obligation imposed by the EU on Romania, with the prime minister arguing that in Brussels the Green Deal is “a true religion”.»

Romania and Hungary clash over Black Sea gas distribution

Romania. È energeticamente autosufficiente ed esporta gas naturale.

* * * * * * *

Negli ultimi sondaggi di propensione al voto il pnl avrebbe una larga affermazione, dal 37% al 47%, mentre il partito socialista risulterebbe essere dimezzato al 23.9%.

Sarebbe una grande mutazione degli orientamenti politici, specie poi in sede di Consiglio Europeo.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Slovakia. OL’aNO 25.3%, Smer-SD crolla dal 28.3% al 13.9%.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2020-03-01.

Slovakia 002

Questo risultato era stato previsto:

Slovakia. Domenica si vota. I sondaggi indicherebbero una inversione di rotta.

«Smer – SD. Direction – Social Democracy is a social-democratic and left-wing populist political party in Slovakia. It is led by former Prime Minister of Slovakia Robert Fico. Smer-SD is the largest party in the National Council, with a plurality of 49 seats following the parliamentary Election held on 5 March 2016.»

«Ol’aNO. Ordinary People, full name Ordinary People and Independent Personalities, is a populist, conservative political party in Slovakia.»

«In 2019 the Ordinary People suggested to toughen restrictions on abortions. The proposal included a fee charge for abortion for women over 40 years of age»

«In 2019 during the election campaign the leader Igor Matovič promised that the Ordinary People will not enter a government that would approve registered partnerships for same sex couples»

Nell’europarlamento Smer-SD è affiliato al gruppo S%D, mentre Ol’aNO aderisce all’EPP.

*

«The opposition Ordinary People party (OLaNO) has won a resounding victory in Slovakia’s parliamentary election on a wave of anti-corruption sentiment. …. With nearly all results counted, the party has secured almost 25% of votes.»

«The result has unseated the centre-left Smer-SD party, which dominated Slovak politics for a decade and garnered just over 18%. …. Prime Minister Peter Pellegrini has admitted defeat.»

«Opposition protest party Sme Rodina (We Are Family) gained 8.26%, followed closely by the far-right People’s Party Our Slovakia (LSNS)»

«The threshold for coalitions is higher, however, and the centre-left liberal Progressive Slovakia (PS-SPOLU) failed to reach the 7% required»

«The center-right populist opposition claimed victory in the parliamentary election in Slovakia, ending the reign of the country’s long dominant but scandal-tainted leftist party that governed on an anti-immigration platform»

«According to nearly complete results released by the Statistics Office early Sunday, the Ordinary People group captured 25% of the vote and 53 seats in the 150-seat parliament in a move that steered the country to the right and could make a local ally of France’s far-right National Rally party led by Marine Le Pen a part of the governing coalition»

«The senior ruling leftist Smer-Social Democracy party led by former populist Prime Minister Robert Fico was in second with 18.3% or 38 seats.»

«Matovic is expected to govern with the pro-business Freedom and Solidarity party that made 6.2% (13 seats) and the conservative For People established by former President Andrej Kiska that finished with 5.8% (12 seats).»

«Although the three would have a majority with 78 seats, Matovic said he also want to rule with Le Pen’s ally, We Are Family, a populist right group that placed third with 8.2% or 17 seats.»

«We’re not here to fight cultural wars»

* * * * * * *

La Slovakia si sta avviando alla formazione di un governo che potrebbe essere etichettato come di “centro-destra“, “identitario” oppure anche “sovranista“.

Sono tuttavia etichette che rendono ben poco il quadro politico.

«We’re not here to fight cultural wars»

I partiti vincitori saranno più attenti ai problemi interni, ma in politica esterasaranno dapprima slovacchi e poi aderenti l’Unione Europea.  

*


Slovakia election: Anti-corruption party takes lead.

The opposition Ordinary People party (OLaNO) has won a resounding victory in Slovakia’s parliamentary election on a wave of anti-corruption sentiment.

With nearly all results counted, the party has secured almost 25% of votes.

The popularity of the Ordinary People party soared in recent weeks, thanks to its anti-corruption agenda.

The election campaign was dominated by public anger over the 2018 murder of an investigative journalist, Jan Kuciak, and his fiancée, Martina Kusnirova.

The result has unseated the centre-left Smer-SD party, which dominated Slovak politics for a decade and garnered just over 18%.

Prime Minister Peter Pellegrini has admitted defeat.

The shooting shocked the nation and toppled PM Robert Fico, but his Smer-SD party remained in office.

Opposition protest party Sme Rodina (We Are Family) gained 8.26%, followed closely by the far-right People’s Party Our Slovakia (LSNS).

Two other parties also secured the 5% of votes needed to enter parliament: the liberal opposition Svoboda a Solidarita (SAS, Freedom and Solidarity) and the anti-graft liberal opposition Za Ludi party.

The threshold for coalitions is higher, however, and the centre-left liberal Progressive Slovakia (PS-SPOLU) failed to reach the 7% required.

The general election comes after last year’s presidential vote, won by anti-corruption campaigner and lawyer Zuzana Caputova – a political newcomer.

*

Slovak opposition party OLANO takes lead in election: partial results.

Slovak opposition party Ordinary People (OLANO) took the lead in the EU country’s parliamentary election, results from one third of voting districts showed on Sunday.

The partial results showed the anti-corruption movement OLANO winning 23.7% of the vote, followed by the ruling center-left Smer party with 20.6%.

*

Slovakia’s populist opposition wins parliamentary election.

The center-right populist opposition claimed victory in the parliamentary election in Slovakia, ending the reign of the country’s long dominant but scandal-tainted leftist party that governed on an anti-immigration platform.

According to nearly complete results released by the Statistics Office early Sunday, the Ordinary People group captured 25% of the vote and 53 seats in the 150-seat parliament in a move that steered the country to the right and could make a local ally of France’s far-right National Rally party led by Marine Le Pen a part of the governing coalition.

“We will try to form the best government Slovakia’s ever had,” Ordinary People chairman Igor Matovic told a cheering crowd of 2,000 supporters in a sports hall in his hometown of Trnava, located northeast of the capital.

Officials measured the temperature of every person coming over the new coronavirus fears. Slovakia hasn’t a single case confirmed yet.

The senior ruling leftist Smer-Social Democracy party led by former populist Prime Minister Robert Fico was in second with 18.3% or 38 seats.

Smer has been in power for most of the past 14 years, winning big in every election since 2006. It gained 28.3% in the last election in 2016 after campaigning on an anti-migrant ticket. But the party was damaged by political turmoil following the 2018 slayings of an investigative journalist and his fiancee.

In what would be a further blow for Smer, its two current coalition partners, the ultra-nationalist Slovak National Party and a party of ethnic Hungarians looked like they wouldn’t win any seats.

Pro-western Matovic, 46, has made fighting corruption and attacking Fico the central tenet of his campaign. An anti-corruption drive has been in his party’s program since he established it 10 years ago.

As the president traditionally asks the election’s winner to try to form a government, he is the likeliest candidate for prime minister. Matovic is expected to govern with the pro-business Freedom and Solidarity party that made 6.2% (13 seats) and the conservative For People established by former President Andrej Kiska that finished with 5.8% (12 seats).

Although the three would have a majority with 78 seats, Matovic said he also want to rule with Le Pen’s ally, We Are Family, a populist right group that placed third with 8.2% or 17 seats.

“I’d like to assure everybody that there’s nothing to worry about,” he said. “We’re not here to fight cultural wars.”

It’s hard to estimate whether their partnership can survive the whole four-year term.

An extreme far-right party whose members use Nazi salutes and which wants Slovakia out of the European Union and NATO became the fourth most popular party in the country of just under 5.5 million with 8% and 17 seats.

The far-right People’s Party Our Slovakia already won 8% and 14 seats in parliament in 2016.

All other parties have ruled out cooperation with the party that advocates the legacy of the Slovak Nazi puppet World War II state.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Slovakia. Domenica si vota. I sondaggi indicherebbero una inversione di rotta.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2020-02-28.

Slovakia 002

Le elezioni in Slovakia sembrerebbero riservare delle sorprese.

Solo un mese fa la situazione era fluida, la parcellizzazione politica molto elevata, ma lo Smer-SD guidava saldamente le propensioni al voto.

Slovakia. Il 29 febbraio terrà le elezioni politiche. Grandi incertezze.

La situazione politica slovacca è di grande interesse per l’Europa e per l’Italia sia perché essa ha un voto in sede del Consiglio Europeo, sia perché al momento è travagliata da una severa crisi politica, accentuata da una legge elettorale proporzionale. Ma il quadro politico è fortemente frammentato: si presentano infatti ben venticinque partiti politici. Tutto potrebbe essere possibile.

Alle elezioni presidenziali del 30 marzo 2019:

«Zuzana Caputova ha vinto al ballottaggio le elezioni presidenziali in Slovacchia con il 58,27 per cento dei voti. Caputova si impone sul suo rivale, il socialista Maros Sefcovic, che ha ottenuto il 41,73% dei voti. Paladina di ecologisti e minoranze e prima donna capo di Stato del Paese ha incentrato la sua campagna elettorale sull’anti-corruzione, e con un approccio più vicino all’Unione europea.» [Fonte]

Zuzana Čaputová era la leader di Progressive Slovakia, e fu appoggiata dal SaS e dallo SPOLU.

* * * * * * *

Per migliorare la comprensione di questo quadro chaotico, riportiamo le definizioni delle sigle usate.

Smer – SD. Direction – Social Democracy is a social-democratic and left-wing populist political party in Slovakia. It is led by former Prime Minister of Slovakia Robert Fico. Smer-SD is the largest party in the National Council, with a plurality of 49 seats following the parliamentary Election held on 5 March 2016.

SaS. Freedom and Solidarity is a liberal, libertarian, and Eurosceptic political party in Slovakia. The party was established in 2009 and is led by its founder, the economist Richard Sulík, who designed Slovakia’s flat tax system. In the 2012 parliamentary election, the SaS lost half of its 22 seats in the National Council. The party held four positions in the government of Slovakia before the election.

Ol’aNO. Ordinary People, full name Ordinary People and Independent Personalities, is a populist, conservative political party in Slovakia. It ran four candidates on the list of the Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party in the 2010 parliamentary election to the National Council, and all four were elected. The party is led by Igor Matovič, one of the four MPs.

SNS. The Slovak National Party is a nationalist political party in Slovakia. The party characterizes itself as a nationalist party based on both social and the European Christian values.

Kotlebovci-L’SNS. The People’s Party – Our Slovakia, formerly known as Kotleba – People’s Party – Our Slovakia, and since November 2019 officially known as Kotlebists – People’s Party Our Slovakia, is a far-right neo-Nazi political party in Slovakia. The party derives its origin from the legacy of Ľudovít Štúr, Andrej Hlinka and Jozef Tiso.

PS – Spolu. Progressive Slovakia is a social-liberal, progressive and pro-European political party in Slovakia. It was established in 2017. TOGETHER – Civic Democracy is a liberal conservative political party in Slovakia. It was established in 2018.

Za L’udì. For the People is a slovak political party founded by former Slovak president Andrej Kiska in 2019. Kiska became party’s leader on founding convention on 28 September 2019.

* * * * * * *

2020-02-28__Slovaia 001

«With polls suggesting his OLaNO party is skyrocketing in popularity, eccentric MP and party leader Igor Matovic appears to have galvanised public outrage over the murder and the high-level corruption it exposed.

“I like their (OLaNO) anti-corruption measures,” butcher Miroslav Drugda told AFP at a packed Matovic election rally in Lucenec, a small central Slovak town some 250 kilometres (155 miles) east of Bratislava.

A self-made millionaire and former media boss who set up the “Ordinary People and Independent Personalities – OLaNO” a decade ago, Matovic, 46, could become premier should he manage to unify the splintered opposition» [Fonte]

A ciò si aggiungano i lai dei liberal per la presunta crescita di Sns, che però nei fatti è quotata attorno al 3.4%: difficile comprendere di cosa si lamentino.

Riassumendo.

Sembrerebbe prospettarsi una vittoria del Ol’aNO, ad oggi quotato al 19.1%.

*


The rise of yet another neofascist party expands Europe’s populist reach.

In elections around the world, a familiar pattern is emerging.

It usually goes something like this: To the surprise of the establishment, a fringe party rises in the polls, appealing to populist sentiments and a frustration with the status quo. Everyone worries about it, but not overly. After all, the political landscape has for decades been dominated by the usual parties. Then, the extremist party pulls off a surprise victory. In the mea culpa that ensues, pundits will say the elites failed to listen to the silent majority of voters who felt they’d been left behind—by globalization, the European Union, you name it.

Slovakia, a Central European country that’s been part of the EU since 2004, now looks set to follow this trend. On Feb. 29, Slovakians will elect 150 members of the country’s parliament. Polls show the incumbent Social Democratic party leading, with a projected 17% to 20% of the popular vote. But not far behind, with 10% to 12%, is the People’s Party-Our Slovakia, a far-right group led by neofascist politician Marian Kotleba.

The party’s success could have far-reaching implications for Slovakia’s young democracy, and for the populist tide sweeping through Europe.

In a class of its own

In recent years, far-right parties have joined governments across Europe in what some have called a populist wave. This has been especially true in the Central European countries of Poland, Czechia, Hungary, and Slovakia.

Aliaksei Kazharski, a researcher at Comenius University in Bratislava, wrote in a 2017 paper that since the 2013 European migrant crisis, political elites in these countries have been building new identities to counter the liberalism of Western Europe. “These new identities favor a culturalist, conservative interpretation of the nation and reject humanitarian universalism, epitomized by the European Union’s decision to welcome the refugees,” he wrote.

And while other ultraconservative and ultranationalist parties have made gains in Slovakia in recent years—including the Slovak National Party and the We Are Family Party, now polling at 5% and 7%, respectively—the People’s Party stands in a class of its own.

Marian Kotleba, the head of the People’s Party, openly admires Jozef Tiso, who was the leader of Slovakia’s Nazi-allied state. Tiso was executed for war crimes in 1947 after he sent more than 70,000 Slovakian Jews to their death in concentration camps. Kotleba unsuccessfully ran for president last year and, according to Reuters, is now on trial for handing out social subsidy checks to poor families for €1,488, “a number used by extremists to represent white supremacism and a Nazi salute.”

Miroslava Sawiris, a researcher who tracks online disinformation in political campaigns at the Bratislava-based think tank GLOBSEC, said that even in the European Parliament, where a far-right bloc controls 10% of seats and the People’s Party has one elected representative, “they are isolated because this party is extreme, even for the other far-right parties” in Europe.

The party’s platform, officially called the “Ten Commandments,” includes the following proposals.

The election

For years, the left-leaning Social Democrat party has dominated Slovakian politics. But trust in the party has eroded due to accusations of corruption and ties government officials had to the murder of an investigative journalist and his fiancée.

These scandals help explain why the virulent anti-corruption and anti-establishment message of the People’s Party seems to be resonating with Slovakian voters. In fact, says Martin Reguli, a senior analyst at the Bratislava-based F.A. Hayek Foundation, “a lot of what is going on right now is a referendum on their record.” In the latest Eurobarometer survey, 70% of Slovaks said they didn’t trust their national parliament or their government.

Sawiris says social media platforms, especially Facebook, have also played a role.

“The unregulated landscape that they offer is contributing towards this radicalization and polarization of people in Slovakia,” she said. The People’s Party was able to “build up a very efficient network of related pages on Facebook…and what they offer is basically a constant stream of anti-campaign for all the other parties and very strong propaganda machine for this particular party.”

As a result, the party has grown in popularity. It got more than 8% of the vote in the last parliamentary election in 2016, and more than 12% of the vote in the 2019 European Parliament election, propelled by central and northern districts with high levels of unemployment, and which are home to large settlements of Roma (pdf),  a large ethnic minority in Europe that has long been a favorite scapegoat of far-right parties. There are about 400,000 Roma living in Slovakia.

“Around a third of the Roma people in Slovakia live in extreme poverty, and they present an easy image for the ‘other,’” said Pavol Hardoš, a lecturer at the Institute of European Studies and International Relations at Comenius University.

The People’s Party has so far failed to poll higher than 14% ahead of the upcoming general election. But analysts say that, depending on turnout and the performance of smaller groups in the upcoming election, more mainstream parties may have to ally themselves with the People’s Party—even though all the major parties that make up the current parliament have ruled that out.

Reguli said that even if the party performs worse than expected on election day, their ideas have already successfully entered the mainstream. Last year, members of the Slovak National Party proposed a bill that would have forced women seeking an abortion to first listen to the fetal heartbeat and look at ultrasound images of the fetus. (The bill was rejected.) And officials say that an amendment to the constitution passed in 2014 defining marriage as “the unique bond between one man and one woman” has institutionalized homophobia.

“The danger isn’t necessarily from Kotleba and his party,” Hardoš said. “The danger is that his ideas, or the ideas of the radical right, are already very much normalized in Slovak discourse.”

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Slovakia. Il 29 febbraio terrà le elezioni politiche. Grandi incertezze.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2020-02-04.

2020-01-30__Slovakia 001

«there is a real chance of the far-right victory»

*

«Saranno 25 i partiti politici, movimenti e coalizioni che hanno presentato i loro candidati per le elezioni del 2020, come comunicato dal ministero degli Interni una volta scaduti i termini, domenica a mezzanotte. Entro lo stesso termine i partiti politici hanno dovuto pagare un deposito elettorale per un importo di 17.000 euro, che sarà loro restituito se otterranno almeno il 2% dei voti. Per la campagna elettorale, iniziata ufficialmente il 5 novembre, i partiti possono spendere un massimo di 3 milioni di euro (IVA inclusa). Ciascun partito deve disporre di un conto bancario trasparente, che viene regolarmente aggiornato nell’apposita sezione del sito del ministero degli Interni» [Buongiorno Slovacchia]

*

La situazione politica slovacca è di grande interesse per l’Europa e per l’Italia sia perché essa ha un voto in sede del Consiglio Europeo, sia perché al momento è travagliata da una severa crisi politica, accentuata da una legge elettorale proporzionale. Ma il quadro politico è fortemente frammentato: si presentano infatti ben venticinque partiti politici. Tutto potrebbe essere possibile.

Alle elezioni presidenziali del 30 marzo 2019:

«Zuzana Caputova ha vinto al ballottaggio le elezioni presidenziali in Slovacchia con il 58,27 per cento dei voti. Caputova si impone sul suo rivale, il socialista Maros Sefcovic, che ha ottenuto il 41,73% dei voti. Paladina di ecologisti e minoranze e prima donna capo di Stato del Paese ha incentrato la sua campagna elettorale sull’anti-corruzione, e con un approccio più vicino all’Unione europea.» [Fonte]

*

«L’avvocatessa divorziata 45enne Zuzana Caputova, leader di “Slovacchia progressiva“ – il movimento liberal anti-corruzione, anti-autocrazia ed europeista nato dalle proteste della società civile dopo l´assassinio del giornalista investigativo Jan Kuciak e della sua compagna – ha vinto di larga misura il primo turno delle elezioni presidenziali slovacche a suffragio universale, svoltesi ieri.» [Fonte]

*

Alle elezioni europee 2019 la Coalition aveva ottenuto il 20.11% dei voti, lo Smer (Socialdemocrazia) il 15.72%, il Kotleba il 12.07%, il Movimento Cristiano Democratico il 9.62% e Freedom and Solidariety il 9.62%.

*

La situazione attuale è, quanto meno, fluida.

«L’attuale coalizione di governo slovacca – guidata dal socialdemocratico Petr Pellegrini e formata in maniera atipica dai socialdemocratici di Smer-socialni demokracie (Smer-SD), dal Partito nazionale slovacco (Sns, schieramento populista di destra) e da Most-Hid (espressione quest’ultimo della minoranza ungherese in Slovacchia. ….

Egli non ha comunque nascosto la fragilità di un equilibrio che si basa una maggioranza di 76 deputati su 150, così ripartiti: 48 Smer, 15 Sns e 13 Most.

Si tratta d’altra parte della medesima alleanza che è riuscita a rimanere in piedi nel 2018, nonostante le imponenti manifestazioni seguite all’assassinio del giornalista di inchiesta Jan Kuciak e della sua fidanzata Martina, con migliaia di cittadini scesi in piazza a protestare contro il clima di corruzione dilagante nel paese. Una ondata di malcontento costata il posto all’allora premier Robert Fico (Smer-Sd), il quale un mese dopo l’omicidio di Kuciak, fu costretto a lasciare il posto a Pellegrini.»

*

«Nel 2010, Kotleba ha lanciato ‘Kotleba – Partito Popolare La nostra Slovacchia’. In quell’anno ha ottenuto meno dell’1,5 per cento dei voti nel parlamento nazionale, ma non è bastato a scoraggiare Marián Kotleba. Ha modificato ancora una volta …. ed è stato eletto governatore della regione di Banská Bystrica nel 2013. Il suo partito è finalmente entrato nel parlamento slovacco con oltre l’8 per cento dei voti nel 2016, nonostante la derisione iniziale che aveva ricevuto dagli analisti politici.

Il sostegno a Kotleba sta crescendo, e il suo partito che di recente ha superato l’11 per cento e ora occupa due seggi nel parlamento europeo.»  [Fonte]

* * * * * * *

Per migliorare la comprensione di questo quadro chaotico, riportiamo le definizioni delle sigle usate.

Smer – SD. Direction – Social Democracy is a social-democratic and left-wing populist political party in Slovakia. It is led by former Prime Minister of Slovakia Robert Fico. Smer-SD is the largest party in the National Council, with a plurality of 49 seats following the parliamentary Election held on 5 March 2016.

SaS. Freedom and Solidarity is a liberal, libertarian, and Eurosceptic political party in Slovakia. The party was established in 2009 and is led by its founder, the economist Richard Sulík, who designed Slovakia’s flat tax system. In the 2012 parliamentary election, the SaS lost half of its 22 seats in the National Council. The party held four positions in the government of Slovakia before the election.

Ol’aNO. Ordinary People, full name Ordinary People and Independent Personalities, is a populist, conservative political party in Slovakia. It ran four candidates on the list of the Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party in the 2010 parliamentary election to the National Council, and all four were elected. The party is led by Igor Matovič, one of the four MPs.

SNS. The Slovak National Party is a nationalist political party in Slovakia. The party characterizes itself as a nationalist party based on both social and the European Christian values.

Kotlebovci-L’SNS. The People’s Party – Our Slovakia, formerly known as Kotleba – People’s Party – Our Slovakia, and since November 2019 officially known as Kotlebists – People’s Party Our Slovakia, is a far-right neo-Nazi political party in Slovakia. The party derives its origin from the legacy of Ľudovít Štúr, Andrej Hlinka and Jozef Tiso.

PS – Spolu. Progressive Slovakia is a social-liberal, progressive and pro-European political party in Slovakia. It was established in 2017. TOGETHER – Civic Democracy is a liberal conservative political party in Slovakia. It was established in 2018.

Za L’udì. For the People is a slovak political party founded by former Slovak president Andrej Kiska in 2019. Kiska became party’s leader on founding convention on 28 September 2019.

* * * * * * *


How Slovakia’s far-right might pull off an election victory

A month before its general election on 29 February, Slovakia seems overwhelmed by fears that a wide-felt frustration over corruption – revealed as part of an investigation into the shocking murder of an investigative journalist in 2018 – could lead to a historic victory for far-right extremists.

The current court trial – covered in detail by all Slovak and several European media outlets – last week saw prominent oligarchs questioned about their contacts with the man accused of ordering the double killing.

Investigative reporter Jan Kuciak, 27, and his fiancée Martina Kusnirova, also 27, were shot dead in their house in Velka Maca, in West Slovakia, on 21 February 2018, just two months before their planned wedding.

The murders sparked protests across the country and forced a major cabinet reshuffle, including the resignation of prime minister Robert Fico of the ruling social democrat Smer-SD party.

Days before his death, Kuciak was finalising an article for the Aktuality.sk website about top Smer-SD links with the Italian ´Ndrangheta mafia and their agriculture business – supported by generous EU farm subsidies in eastern Slovakia.

But, following an intensive investigation, the special police team eventually arrested a group of people accused of working for Marian Kocner, a local businessman reportedly tied to high-profile members of the ruling party, as well as police officials and judges, in September 2018.

Kocner´s mobile and searches of his house provided videos, audio recordings and messages which, when published, led to political uproar and general dismay over the state of Slovakia´s police and judiciary.

Political bombshell

Smer-SD, ruling Slovakia since 2006 (apart from the 2010-2012 period of centre-right coalition government of Iveta Radicova) suffered the most political damage, as their representatives played key roles in several scandals revealed by Kocner’s private communications.

The current prime minister Peter Pellegrini, Fico’s successor as the cabinet but not party leader, has attempted to portray himself as symbolising the ‘new Smer-SD’, and is running on the pre-election campaign slogan “Responsible Change”.

And – despite the tensions between the two leaders and the negative media coverage – the party recently polled around 18 percent, which is a considerate drop on its performance in previous elections (28 percent in 2016, and 44 percent in 2012) but still in first place.

However, this pole-position could be overtaken by an unexpected competitor: the far-right extremist and anti-Europe, Popular Party of Our Slovakia (LSNS), led by Marian Kotleba, polling second on around 13 percent. The party first entered the national parliament in 2016, with eight percent of the vote.

“The trend of LSNS rise is strong and crystal-clear,” Vaclav Hřích, the AKO agency director told EUobserver. “If support for Smer-SD continues to drop as it does with every new poll, they could eventually fall behind the far-right.”

“Kuciak’s murder and all the findings along its investigation have simply shocked the people. They say that they always knew all the politicians steal a bit. But this is just too much and it can only be tackled by the overhaul of the whole political system.”

“For a growing part of the society this change should come from someone totally new, never before connected in any way with the current establishment, whether from coalition or opposition parties, whether on the right or left side of the political spectrum,” Hřích argued.

“The mere fact that they are ´new´ and never actually took part in national government is for some supporters a sufficient reason to turn a blind eye to criminal records and racist or xenophobic statements of LSNS representatives.”

Political newcomers

But there are also newcomers among some of the leading parties of the democratic opposition, which have also enjoyed a boost in popularity in the wake of the public protests following Kuciak’s murder.

The Progressive Slovakia liberal party was helped by the impressive victory of Zuzana Caputova, its candidate in the 2019 presidential elections – but then somewhat failed to keep the momentum under its new leader Michal Truban, an IT specialist and political newbie.

Former president Andrej Kiska initially sparked hopes of unifying the anti-Smer-SD opposition – but then caused some disappointment when he decided to run his new For the People party (Za ludi) alone, and not as part of a broader coalition.

Both these parties now poll at around 10 percent, followed by three to four potential coalition partners in the new government, if they get enough votes at the 29 February elections.

Statistically, this very broad coalition is still the most likely post-election scenario, Hřích suggested.

All government and opposition party leaders passionately declare they would never join forces with the hard-right LSNS.

However, Smer-SD previously coordinated their votes in the parliament with the far-right MPs on issues not supported by their current coalition partners, mainly the centre-right Most-Hid party.

“The ruling coalition is only formed after the vote, never mind the pre-election rhetoric,” commented Hřích, adding “The simple fact that there is a real chance of the far-right victory could yet prove a strong mobilisation factor for its opponents. But it is sad anyway what we have got into.”

Pubblicato in: Geopolitica Europea

Svizzera. I partiti ambientalisti al 22%.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-10-20.

2019-10-20__Svizzera 001

«Le proiezioni uscite alle 18 (i seggi si sono chiusi alle 12) dicono che i Verdi «tradizionali» balzano dal 7 al 13% mentre il Partito dei verdi liberali lievita dal 4 al 7,6%. Sommando i due exploit, ne risulta che il fronte ambientalista in Svizzera vale quasi il 22%, divenendo la seconda «area» politica del Paese. Il primo gradino resterebbe ancora appannaggio dell’Udc, il partito «sovranista», anti Ue e anti immigrati che si stabilizza al 25,8%, comunque in calo di quasi 4 punti percentuali rispetto a cinque anni fa. Indice in discesa per altri due partiti tradizionali del parlamento di Berna: i socialisti passano dal 18,8 al 16,5, i liberali dal 16,4 al 15,5. Sostanzialmente stabile invece il Partito Popolare (di ispirazione centrista e cristiana) attorno 12%.»

«Sempre in base alle proiezioni, i Verdi alla camera «bassa» passerebbero da 11 a 26 seggi, i verdi liberali da 7 a 14; l’Udc ne perderebbe invece 8 scendendo a 57»

Se i risultati degli exit polls dovessero essere confermati, il quadro politico svizzero risulterebbe essere mutato.


Elezioni in Svizzera: i partiti ambientalisti al 22%, giù i sovranisti

Perdono tutti i partiti tradizionali. La svolta ecologista di Berna nel solco di quanto è accaduto in altri paesi europei (come Germania e Austria) di recente andati alle urne.

L’onda verde investe la Svizzera: le elezioni per il rinnovo del Parlamento che si sono svolte oggi premiano anche al di là delle previsioni i due partiti che mettono al centro i temi ambientalisti mentre tutti i partiti storici, a cominciare dai sovranisti dell’Udc, sono in flessione. La Confederazione Elvetica si inserisce dunque nel «mainstream» politico che ha già scompaginato altri paesi europei (ad esempio Germania e Austria) andati di recente alle urne dove i movimenti ecologisti sono in netto rialzo.

Chi sale e chi scende

Le proiezioni uscite alle 18 (i seggi si sono chiusi alle 12) dicono che i Verdi «tradizionali» balzano dal 7 al 13% mentre il Partito dei verdi liberali lievita dal 4 al 7,6%. Sommando i due exploit, ne risulta che il fronte ambientalista in Svizzera vale quasi il 22%, divenendo la seconda «area» politica del Paese. Il primo gradino resterebbe ancora appannaggio dell’Udc, il partito «sovranista», anti Ue e anti immigrati che si stabilizza al 25,8%, comunque in calo di quasi 4 punti percentuali rispetto a cinque anni fa. Indice in discesa per altri due partiti tradizionali del parlamento di Berna: i socialisti passano dal 18,8 al 16,5, i liberali dal 16,4 al 15,5. Sostanzialmente stabile invece il Partito Popolare (di ispirazione centrista e cristiana) attorno 12%.

Quadro politico mutato

Manca ancora una attribuzione definitiva dei seggi per la Camera dei deputati mentre per la Camera degli Stati (l’equivalente del Senato) occorrerà probabilmente attendere alcuni ballottaggi. Sempre in base alle proiezioni, i Verdi alla camera «bassa» passerebbero da 11 a 26 seggi, i verdi liberali da 7 a 14; l’Udc ne perderebbe invece 8 scendendo a 57. Una cosa è certa: la stabilità del quadro politico svizzero subisce uno scossone e alcuni dei temi negli ultimi anni al centro del dibattito (a cominciare dalla tenuta a distanza della Ue) potrebbero cedere il passo ad altri temi (questione energetica, economia green, trasporti) più cari ai movimenti ambientalisti.

Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo

Canada. Elezioni politiche del 21 ottobre.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-10-19.

2019-10-18__Canada 001

Il 21 ottobre si terranno in Canada le elezioni politiche federali.

I sondaggi più recenti indicherebbero un lievissimo vantaggio dei Conservatori rispetto al Liberal Party, ma la differenza giace nella fascia dell’errore previsionale.

Di dati umanamente certi ne emergono solo tre.

– Le previsioni degli ultimi anni hanno dato quasi sempre i Conservatori in vantaggio, sia pur lieve, sui liberal;

– Rispetto ai risultati elettorali del 2015 l’unica variazione significativa è il calo percentuale dei liberal, scesi da 39.5% all’attuale 31.5% dei sondaggi;

– Nelle elezioni degli Stati i liberal hanno quasi invariabilmente perso le elezioni.

* * * * * * *

La posta in gioco è elevata, sia per il Canada sia per l’assetto politico mondiale.

Il Governo Trudeau è l’ultimo governo liberal nel continente americano: se crollasse il fronte della Alleanza Progressista ne uscirebbe profondamente ridimensionato. Ha già perso le elezioni in Brasile, ed un’evenienza del genere potrebbe sancirne la devoluzione.

Senza Mr Trudeau al governo, un accordo con gli Stati Uniti di Mr Trump diventerebbe notevolmente più facile, con una stabilizzazione dell’assetto commerciale del continente.


Chi è il ‘Trump canadese’ che sfida Trudeau alle elezioni.

L’ondata populista ha raggiunto anche il Canada, dove si vota il 21 ottobre, e il tema dell’immigrazione è diventata uno dei dibattiti della campagna con i partiti conservatori che premono per limitare il numero degli arrivi. Il 21 ottobre gli aventi diritto canadesi andranno alle urne, chiamati a rinnovare il mandato di 338 deputati; e si preannuncia un testa a testa tra il premier uscente, il liberale Justin Trudeau e il leader della destra populista, il conservatore Andrew Scheer.

Difficilmente, però, il vincitore riuscirà ad ottenere la maggioranza assoluta quindi per poter governare dovrà formare una coalizione con altri partiti. Gli ultimi sondaggi indicano una situazione di parità tra il premier, a capo del Partito liberale dal 2015, e il 40enne Scheer, già soprannominato il Trump canadese. Secondo il sondaggio di ‘338 Canada’, il partito Conservatore è in testa con il 32,3% dei consensi, mentre il partito Liberale arriva subito dietro con il 31%.

Le proiezioni dei seggi vedono un pareggio esatto, con circa 133 seggi sia per i Liberali che per i Conservatori, comunque sotto i 370 necessari per avere la maggioranza assoluta. Un risultato che, se confermato, rappresenterebbe una sorpresa visto che fino a poche settimane fa il partito di governo sembrava a un passo dalla riconferma della maggioranza assoluta.

Ad ogni modo, che vinca l’uno o l’altro, si profila un governo di coalizione con alcuni degli altri quattro partiti in lizza: il New Democratic Party (NDP socialdemocratico) di Janghmeet Singh (al 17,3%), il partito Verde (Green Party) di Elizabeth May al 9,1%, il Bloc Quèbècois, al 6,8%, guidato da Yves-Francois Blanchet, e i Popolari (il Peoplès Party of Canada) di Maxime Bernier al 2,7%.

Per Scheer, trovare alleati per formare un governo di coalizione sarebbe molto difficile, essendo considerato il nemico numero uno degli altri partiti che dovrebbero entrare in Parlamento. I Liberali, invece, in questo scenario avrebbero buone probabilità di formare un governo di coalizione con Democratici e Verdi. Trudeau, 48 anni, arriva al voto indebolito da alcuni scandali che lo hanno coinvolto negli ultimi mesi: l’accusa di favoreggiamento per evitare un’indagine a carico della grande azienda canadese di costruzioni, la Snc-Lavalin, e quella di razzismo, dopo la pubblicazione sulla stampa di una foto risalente al 2001, in cui appare con una ‘blackface’, il volto dipinto di nero in occasione di una festa in maschera. 

I temi su cui si è concentrata la sua campagna elettorale sono stati, oltre alle politiche migratorie, la questione del clima e le accuse di corruzione, affrontati nel corso di una serie di dibattiti televisivi in lingua inglese e francese. Dopo aver ricevuto minacce alla sua vita e a quella dei famigliari, in qualche occasione il premier uscente ha dovuto indossare un giubbotto antiproiettile ai comizi, svolti tra ingenti misure di sicurezza.

Dopo anni di grande popolarità, Trudeau è ora messo in seria difficoltà da Scheer, classe 1979, famiglia di origine rumena molto cattolica, esponente di spicco dell’ala più radicale dei giovani conservatori, diventato parlamentare a soli 25 anni e nel 2011 più giovane speaker della House of Commons canadese.

Alle elezioni del 2015 la sua ascesa venne fermata dal liberale Trudeau, che sbaragliò tutti. Due anni dopo ha vinto le primarie del partito Conservatore, e da leader ha optato per una dialettica bipolare: sulla scena nazionale Scheer appare più moderato e pacato, seguendo le orme del suo mentore, l’ex primo ministro Harper, ma non appena è lontano dalle telecamere ripropone temi cari a Trump, con toni duri contro i migranti, nei confronti di Trudeau e il negazionismo sui cambiamenti climatici.

Dopo 4 anni di leadership progressista di Trudeau, non proprio in ottimi rapporti con Trump, a guardare con estremo interesse al voto di lunedì sono i vicini di casa, l’amministrazione Usa, così come l’Unione europea, che auspica la riconferma di un alleato forte e stabile in Nord America. Nonostante le differenze di scala, gli osservatori internazionali hanno gli occhi puntati sul Canada per l’importanza non solo simbolica che avrebbe un’eventuale vittoria della destra populista di Scheer: secondo alcuni analisti tale esito potrebbe anche rinvigorire la base dei Repubblicani statunitensi che spera nella rielezione di Trump.