Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Europa. Il problema italiano. Default oppure exit.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-03-13.

2019-03-09__Italia__001

La Tabella riprodotta in fotocopia dovrebbe essere eloquente.

Nel 2008 il Pil espresso in Usd era 2,402 miliardi Usd, nel 2017 ammontava a 1,934.

Sempre nel 2008 il Pil procapite era di 40,689 Usd, mentre a fine 2017 ammontava a 31,989 Usd. Un perdita del 25% circa.

Nel 2008 il debito sovrano era 1,666 miliardi di euro, e nel 2017 era 2,283 miliardi di euro.

Nel volgere di dieci anni i Governi nazionali hanno aumentato il debito pubblico di 617 miliardi. Ma questa immane cifra non è stata utilizzata per investimenti nel comparto produttivo, che poi rendono reddito, bensì in partite correnti: pensioni, sussidi, e così via.

Né, tanto meno, è stata utilizzata per mettere in atto riforme strutturali dello stato, ossia per delegiferate, deburocratizzare, ridurre il numero e le mansioni dei dipendenti pubblici, e per ridurre imposte e tasse.

Le responsabilità di quanti abbiano governato in quell’arco di tempo si configurano come alto tradimento.

E le conseguenze iniziano a farsi sentire con mano pesante.

* * * * * * *

«Crisis brewing in Italy will lead to default, exit from the euro, or both»

*

«There is a dual Italian crisis brewing in the European Union.»

*

«On the one hand, it is a political, or even geopolitical, crisis. Italy is undermining the unity of the European Union; blocking the EU’s recognition of those behind the coup in Venezuela as the legitimate authority; preventing the expansion of sanctions against Russia; and even supporting the ‘yellow vest’ movement in France, which is arousing the anger of the French government.»

*

«On the other hand, the crisis is economic in nature. Italy is once more sliding into a recession (economic growth was negative in the country); Italian banks are again facing financial problems; and the business media has already estimated that the Italian economic crisis could blow up the entire European banking system.»

* * * * * * * * * * *

«There is a strong possibility that the EU’s leaders will soon be faced with a choice: try to save Italy (and the whole of Europe) from yet another crisis or set an example by punishing the Italian government for the country’s independent economic and foreign policies»

*

«bad bank debts of €185 billion were reported in Italy at the end of 2017 – a record for the European Union»

*

«Italy accounts for roughly a quarter of the non-performing loans in the eurozone»

*

«Conte’s cabinet is once again facing a dilemma: either put up with the economic stranglehold by EU bureaucrats (and voter dissatisfaction) or go up against the European Union»

*

«To really understand the Italian problem, it should be borne in mind that, as a member of the European Union and the eurozone, Italy does not have full national sovereignty, especially when it comes to economic matters»

*

«It is clear that conflicts like these indicate political instability within the European Union and the situation is becoming truly volatile»

*

«On the other hand, if this happened then Italy could well declare either a default on its government debt, or its exit from the eurozone, or (as noted by The Telegraph) both at the same time»

* * * * * * * * * * *

«Ironically, the worse hit by such a scenario will be French banks, which Bloomberg estimates have Italian loans worth hundreds of billions of euros on their balance sheets. What’s more, such a shock could see foreign investors (and many European ones) beginning to flee the eurozone, adding a currency component to the banking crisis.»

*

«“the winds of change have crossed the Alps”. For those who lived through the collapse of the USSR, the symbolism of the Italian politician’s phrase, whether intentional or not, cannot but evoke certain associations with what was said in the Soviet information space in the 1980s»

*

«Populist politicians in Europe love comparing the European Union to the late USSR, and this comparison is starting to ring true like never before.»

* * * * * * * * * * *

Bene.

Questa è la situazione che i numeri esprimono, e che sarebbe bene rileggerseli ed impararli a memoria.

L’Italia è nella situazione dell’Unione Sovietica a fine degli anni ’80, e sta seguendo le orme della Grecia.


Oriental Observer. 2019-03-08. Default Or Exit: A Battle Between Italy And The EU Is Inevitable

There is a dual Italian crisis brewing in the European Union. On the one hand, it is a political, or even geopolitical, crisis. Italy is undermining the unity of the European Union; blocking the EU’s recognition of those behind the coup in Venezuela as the legitimate authority; preventing the expansion of sanctions against Russia; and even supporting the ‘yellow vest’ movement in France, which is arousing the anger of the French government.

On the other hand, the crisis is economic in nature. Italy is once more sliding into a recession (economic growth was negative in the country); Italian banks are again facing financial problems; and the business media has already estimated that the Italian economic crisis could blow up the entire European banking system.

There is a strong possibility that the EU’s leaders will soon be faced with a choice: try to save Italy (and the whole of Europe) from yet another crisis or set an example by punishing the Italian government for the country’s independent economic and foreign policies. In turn, Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte’s government will most likely have its own dilemma to deal with: bow down and sell its principles to get help from Brussels or go all out and regain Italian independence. The choice will not be easy and either decision will be painful. Neither ending to this Italian drama could really be called happy. As this headline in The Telegraph quite rightly notes: “Crisis brewing in Italy will lead to default, exit from the euro, or both.”

At the heart of the Italian issue is the fact that the 2008 crisis never really went away, and all the self-congratulations of European (especially Italian) politicians were actually attempts to hide the old, unresolved problems under the carpet. Until recently, the Italian economy had been showing anaemic growth, but it began to decline over the last two quarters. Efforts to borrow more are not helping, either. There are negative interest rates in the eurozone, but it is often more profitable for banks to keep their money in the European Central Bank (even at a negative interest rate) or invest it somewhere outside of Italy than lend it to risky Italian businesses and ordinary Italians who will probably never pay the money back. Indeed, bad bank debts of €185 billion were reported in Italy at the end of 2017 – a record for the European Union. Italy accounts for roughly a quarter of the non-performing loans in the eurozone (i.e. loans that are not being repaid or are seriously overdue), and it is easy to see why Brussels considers the country to be the EU’s weak spot.

Another problem developed after the Conte government – a coalition of two populist, eurosceptic parties – came to power in June 2018. It tried to solve the country’s economic issues by increasing government incentives, but Italy is already in debt (Italy’s national debt is 131 per cent of its GDP). The European Commission warned it against enlarging its budget deficit and increasing its national debt too much, and threatened fines for violating budget discipline.

In light of the European Commission’s threat of economic sanctions (!), the Italian government had to negotiate and make concessions in its fiscal policy, and now, due to Italy’s shrinking economy, Conte’s cabinet is once again facing a dilemma: either put up with the economic stranglehold by EU bureaucrats (and voter dissatisfaction) or go up against the European Union.

To really understand the Italian problem, it should be borne in mind that, as a member of the European Union and the eurozone, Italy does not have full national sovereignty, especially when it comes to economic matters. It does not control the monetary policy of the European Central Bank and cannot even prepare a budget in line with the wishes of its own government or parliament without the risk of running into sanctions or fines from the European Commission. What’s more, Italian eurosceptic politicians suspect that the European Commission (in which the main roles belong to people hand-picked by Germany, France and the US) is punishing Italy and literally strangling its economy because of a political dislike of the Italian government’s geopolitical actions.

Take Rome’s recent move to block the European Union’s recognition of Juan Guaidó as the president of Venezuela, for example. It makes sense that pro-US officials in the European Commission would try to punish Italy as harshly as possible for such behaviour. And Italy’s démarches are not limited to Venezuela. One of the leaders of the government coalition, Deputy Prime Minister of Italy Luigi Di Maio, held a meeting this week with the leaders of the ‘yellow vest’ movement in France and supported their efforts, a move that caused great offence in the government of President Macron, who probably regarded such actions by the Italian authorities as an attempt to legitimise the political demands of a movement set on removing him from power. The French president’s logical response to such actions by the Italian government is to use the European Commission and its budgetary leverage to put pressure on Italy.

It is clear that conflicts like these indicate political instability within the European Union and the situation is becoming truly volatile. On the one hand, the European Commission really could push Italy to the brink of bankruptcy or even trigger a full-blown economic collapse, which would probably (but far from definitely) lead to a change of government in Rome. On the other hand, if this happened then Italy could well declare either a default on its government debt, or its exit from the eurozone, or (as noted by The Telegraph) both at the same time, especially since such threats (right up to the country’s withdrawal from the European Union) have already been made by the government, the unofficial leader of which is Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini.

Ironically, the worse hit by such a scenario will be French banks, which Bloomberg estimates have Italian loans worth hundreds of billions of euros on their balance sheets. What’s more, such a shock could see foreign investors (and many European ones) beginning to flee the eurozone, adding a currency component to the banking crisis. Time will tell whether the European Commission is willing to take such risks to punish Italy’s freedom-loving politicians, but we can already agree with Luigi Di Maio, who, after meeting the French ‘yellow vests’, declared that “the winds of change have crossed the Alps”. For those who lived through the collapse of the USSR, the symbolism of the Italian politician’s phrase, whether intentional or not, cannot but evoke certain associations with what was said in the Soviet information space in the 1980s. At that time, the “winds of change” were blowing through every single crack in the Soviet Union, and we know it never ends well. Populist politicians in Europe love comparing the European Union to the late USSR, and this comparison is starting to ring true like never before.

Annunci
Pubblicato in: Demografia, Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Stati verso il default. Illudersi oggi per suicidarsi domani.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-03-05.

Caravaggio. Davide con la testa di Golia

È stato rilasciato un interessante studio.

Gli stati (a volte) falliscono: ecco quali e quante volte

«Dal 1800 la Germania ha fatto crack 4 volte, l’Austria 7»

*

«Gli Stati occidentali falliti dal 1800 al 2014 sono pochi, ma insospettabili. Tra questi, infatti, ci sono l’Austria, la Spagna, la Grecia e, a sorpresa la Germania, che ha vissuto 4 fallimenti di Stato, l’ultimo dei quali negli anni ’20. Solo la Grecia, tra i Paesi avanzati, è stata protagonista di un default dopo il 1950»

*

«Ma c’è default e default. Tra quelli segnalati dall’Economist vi sono quelli clamorosi, con banche chiuse, code davanti agli sportelli, stipendi pubblici bloccati, e quelli in un certo senso pilotati, gli “haircut”, i default parziali per alleviare dal peso del debito più insostenibile Paesi che hanno stretto un accordo con i debitori, come è il caso della Grecia durante la crisi»

*

«Oggi i fallimenti sembrano un evento estremo, almeno in Occidente. Eppure la storia del passato insegna che non lo sono. Non solo. Oggi nel complesso i rating delle agenzie che valuta l’affidabilità dei debiti degli Stati sono peggiorati rispetto a 10 anni fa. Per esempio quelli di Moody’s che partono da AAA (il rating migliore) e man mano scendono fino a SG (Speculative Grade). L’Italia è Baa2 per intenderci»

*

«In ogni caso nel dettagliato elenco degli Stati falliti c’è un illustre assente: l’Italia, il Paese che (pare) preoccupare i mercati in realtà non ha mai vissuto un fallimento del debito, perlomeno dalla fondazione nel 1861»

* * * * * * * * *

Il tema del default degli stati è intellettualmente affascinante, peccato che il discorso economico in senso stretto sia sempre fortemente inquinato da pesanti considerazioni politiche.

Così, la lettura dei dati numerici nel loro sviluppo storico varia, ed anche in modo consistente, a seconda dell’angolatura politica con la quale si valuta il fenomeno. Nella affannosa ricerca di giustificare le proprie teorie economiche, ovvero anche ideologiche, si corre anche il serio rischio di travisare severamente l’insegnamento storico, primo passo verso la reiterazione del default.

*

Si vorrebbe fare solo alcune considerazioni.

La prima consiste nel valutare oggettivamente la natura del debito.

Una cosa infatti è un debito contratto per finanziare investimenti strutturali che alla fine determineranno un rientro, ed una totalmente differente è un debito volto a mantenere servizi quali il welfare: questi ultimi sono risorse elargite a fondo perduto. È una differenza enorme. Alla prima tipologia sarebbe da ascriversi il debito pubblico cinese, alla seconda quello degli stati occidentali.

*

La seconda considerazione verte sullo storico di un paese.

Dal 1861 l’Italia non ha mai fatto default, la Germania ne ha fatto quattro e l’Austria sette.

Se ci si rende conto che il passato non dia garanzie certe per il futuro, questo è almeno indice di una notevole duttilità di pensiero nel sapersi adattare agli insulti dell’alterna sorte: gli italiani dimostrano spesso una grande capacità di governare le crisi.

*

La terza considerazione verte sugli elementi considerati al fine di giudicare la pericolosità della situazione. È un discorso delicato. Spesso il default è più un problema politico che economico.

Di certo in questi tempi molte nazioni stanno correndo sul filo del rasoio.

Ad un debito sovrano ipertrofico quasi di norma si associa una bilancia commerciale in deficit cronico, pubbliche amministrazioni in dissesto, stagnazione economica, crescita della disoccupazione e della sottooccupazione.

Il rating emesso dalle competenti società tiene appunto conto di tutti questi fattori.

Ma per l’Occidente e per l’Italia il problema attuale emergente sembrerebbe essere un altro, che si associa ai precedenti e con il tempo li offusca.

Italia. Occupati. 9.568 milioni sono occupati a meno di 40 ore settimanali.

In Occidente corre il vezzo di considerare occupata anche la persona che abbia lavorato per una sola ora nel periodo di riferimento: è evidente come il dato degli occupati e dei disoccupati sia inficiato all’origine da una definizione metastabile.

Ma una nazione che lavora poco, ben poco può ricavare, al di là delle alchimie di bilancio.

E questo sarebbe ancora il meno.

I paesi occidentali stanno andando incontro ad una crisi della natalità che li destina alla scomparsa demografica.

Tuttavia, prima di scomparire passeranno attraverso la fase della contrazione del numero di persone in età lavorativa.

Diminuendo la popolazione attiva, il rapporto debito procapite è solo destinato a salire, raggiungendo in breve punti di non ritorno.

*

Sono queste riportate considerazioni invero molto semplici, ma funzionali proprio perché sono tali.

Consentono di valutare la possibilità di default sotto un’angolatura reale e più consona ai nostri tempi.

Gli stati (a volte) falliscono: ecco quali e quante volte.

Dal 1800 la Germania ha fatto crack 4 volte, l’Austria 7. E in futuro i default aumenteranno

L’infografica qui sopra è stata pubblicata dall’Economist (ricerca dati a cura di Carmen Reinhart e Kenneth Rogoff, l’originale può essere consultato a questo link) illustra quali sono gli Stati falliti nel mondo dal 1800 ai giorni nostri. Ogni pallino indica un fallimento dello Stato al quale corrisponde mentre di fianco al nome dello Stato è indicato il numero complessivo dei fallimenti dal 1800 al 2014.

Quanti Stati falliti

Il caso dell’Argentina è il più recente di tutti, quindi ce lo ricordiamo bene, ma nella classifica degli Stati falliti il primo posto è occupato da altri: Ecuador, Venezuela sono crollati ben 10 volte, Uruguay, Costarica, Brasile, Cile 9, e poi, con 8 default, Argentina, Perù, Messico e Turchia.

Gli Stati occidentali falliti dal 1800 al 2014 sono pochi, ma insospettabili. Tra questi, infatti, ci sono l’Austria, la Spagna, la Grecia e, a sorpresa la Germania, che ha vissuto 4 fallimenti di Stato, l’ultimo dei quali negli anni ’20. Solo la Grecia, tra i Paesi avanzati, è stata protagonista di un default dopo il 1950, come ben sappiamo dal quale deve ancora riprendersi completamente, come Truenumbers ha spiegato in questo articolo.

Nella lista manca qualcuno…

Ma c’è default e default. Tra quelli segnalati dall’Economist vi sono quelli clamorosi, con banche chiuse, code davanti agli sportelli, stipendi pubblici bloccati, e quelli in un certo senso pilotati, gli “haircut”, i default parziali per alleviare dal peso del debito più insostenibile Paesi che hanno stretto un accordo con i debitori, come è il caso della Grecia durante la crisi.

In ogni caso nel dettagliato elenco degli Stati falliti c’è un illustre assente: l’Italia, il Paese che (pare) preoccupare i mercati in realtà non ha mai vissuto un fallimento del debito, perlomeno dalla fondazione nel 1861.

I default però sono diversi anche in base all’ammontare. Secondo un report di Moody’s il maggiore è stato appunto quello greco del 2012, quando lo Stato greco trasformò i vecchi titoli di debito in nuovi con una perdita del 70%. In totale il debito “defaultato” è stato di 261 miliardi e 478 milioni di dollari. Nel dicembre dello stesso anno vi fu un altro default del 60% del debito per altri 42 miliardi e 76 milioni. Nel complesso parliamo di 303 miliardi e 554 milioni di dollari.

Molto più per esempio di uno dei default più famosi degli ultimi anni, quello argentino del 2001, il secondo per grandezza. Che fu più semplice e, in un certo senso, netto di quello greco. Lo Stato sudamericano annunciò che non avrebbe pagato le tranche dovute sul debito esterno, verso l’estero. Interessi e capitale. Partì una contrattazione, che tra l’altro ha coinvolto anche migliaia di risparmiatori italiani, in seguito al quale, di fatto fu garantito ai creditori solo il 30% di quanto avrebbero avuto diritto. Un default quindi del 70% per un totale di 82 miliardi e 268 milioni di dollari.

Nel 2014 l’Argentina, ancora

Nel 2014 come indica l’Economist l’Argentina fu ancora protagonista. I pagamenti rateali dovuti ai risparmiatori dopo gli accordi e la ristrutturazione del debito furono bloccati in un fondo fiduciario americano, dove erano stati depositati, per la sentenza di una corte Usa che bloccò gli esborsi se prima lo Stato sudamericano non avesse pagato 1,3 miliardi di dollari ai fondi americani che non avevano accettato il compromesso, con rinuncia al 70% del valore, concordato invece con gran parte dei risparmiatori.

Anche questo è stato calcolato come default, di oltre 29 miliardi di dollari, anche se in un certo senso involontario e provocato dall’esterno.

Perché ce ne saranno altri

Oggi i fallimenti sembrano un evento estremo, almeno in Occidente. Eppure la storia del passato insegna che non lo sono. Non solo. Oggi nel complesso i rating delle agenzi che valuta l’affidabilità dei debiti degli Stati sono peggiorati rispetto a 10 anni fa. Per esempio quelli di Moody’s che partono da AAA (il rating migliore) e man mano scendono fino a SG (Speculative Grade). L’Italia è Baa2 per intenderci e in questo articolo, Truenumbers ha raccontato la storia dell’andamento delle valutazioni, degli ultimi 30 anni, di tutte e tre le maggiori agenzie di rating del mondo.

Nei  grafici sotto si mostra per ogni anno la percentuale di Paesi con rating AAA, quelli con rating Aa – A, Baa e SG. La somma è naturalmente 100%. Quello sotto riguarda le economie avanzate.

Come si vede è calata man mano, da più del 50% nel 2006 al 30% nel 2016 la proporzione di Stati con rating massimo, AAA. Sono invece aumentati fino al 2013 quelli con titoli solo speculativi, ovvero non raccomandabili come destinazione del risparmio (ma solo per specularci sopra), per poi diminuire negli ultimi anni. Così come quelli Baa, tra cui l’Italia per esempio.

Hanno proseguito a peggiorare anche i rating dei Paesi emergenti, come si vede nel grafico sotto.

Quelli con rating solo speculativo sono ormai il 60%, ed erano poco più del 50% nel 2012. Significa che nuovi default non sono, quindi, impossibili. Anzi, appaiono più probabili rispetto al passato.

Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Cina, Finanza e Sistema Bancario

Cina. 11 trilioni Usd di bond. 1.3 trilioni in scadenza entro un anno. – Bloomberg.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-06-20.

2018-06-12__Cina_Bond__001

I mercati finanziari delle grandi potenze economiche ci hanno abituato a trattare cifre da capogiro, che difficilmente mente umana può comprendere appieno.

Il mercato cinese dei bond ammonta ad undici trilioni di dollari americani, e di questi 1.3 trilioni Usd va in scadenza entro dodici mesi.

Nulla da stupirsi se gli investitori stiano domandandosi, alcuni anche in modo accorato, se potranno mai rivedere indietro i soldi impiegati.

Non solo.

Se è vero che a differenza dell’occidente gran parte del debito cinese è stato contratto per finanziare attività produttive, che una volta avviate rendono economicamente, sarebbe altrettanto vero che la guerra sui dazi potrebbe danneggiare almeno alcuni settori, mettendoli in difficoltà con la refusione.

«Given the massive size of the market — now more than $11 trillion, with a further half trillion or so in dollar bonds — it was always going to be a delicate transition»

*

«Potential refinancing of $1.3 trillion looms in coming year»

*

«China’s efforts to connect the world’s third-biggest bond market with the international financial system are hitting dual headwinds — a climb in global borrowing costs, and the country’s own campaign to reduce financial leverage»

*

«The dynamics have contributed to defaults by 12 bond issuers in 2018 through June 4, after 18 for the whole of 2017, according to Fitch Ratings»

*

«But with about 8.2 trillion yuan ($1.3 trillion) of domestic corporate and local-government securities due to mature in the coming 12 months, it’s an open question whether China is prepared to let chips fall where they may»

*

«Authorities started shifting away from the old model of implicit guarantees for practically all debt securities in 2014, allowing defaults for the first time»

*

«Where would the lines be drawn on who goes bust?»

*

«As the U.S. Federal Reserve keeps raising interest rates, and China’s monetary overseers pursue a separate campaign to rein in shadow banking, the coming year may prove decisive in shifting investors away from relying on assumptions of state support — instead forcing them to value bonds based on how likely they are to get their money back.»

*

«Better differentiation between borrowers based on their risk has been long absent in China»

*

«Despite its size, the near-absence of defaults in China’s market until relatively recently was one quirk that kept it out of sync with the rest of the world»

* * * * * * *

Se è vero che i default in Cina sono stati eventi del tutto rari, è altrettanto vero che il passato potrebbe non riproporsi nel futuro. Né è detto che la Cina si astenga dall’usare i default come arma finanziaria.

La Fed ha già iniziato, e proseguirà, ad aumentare i tassi di interesse, e questo fatto potrebbe spostare molte risorse finanziarie dallo yuan al dollaro americano.

Poi, che sia in corso una guerra economica e finanziaria dovrebbe essere sotto gli occhi di tutti, ed in guerra diventa lecito utilizzare anche armi altamente distruttive.

Riassumendo, nessuna idea catastrofista, ma un caldo suggerimento ad usare sana prudenza: nella vita non si sa mai.


Bloomberg. 2018-06-10. China’s $11 Trillion Bond Market Tested by Rising Defaults

– Local idiosyncracies challenge global funds eyeing China

– Potential refinancing of $1.3 trillion looms in coming year

*

China’s efforts to connect the world’s third-biggest bond market with the international financial system are hitting dual headwinds — a climb in global borrowing costs, and the country’s own campaign to reduce financial leverage.

The dynamics have contributed to defaults by 12 bond issuers in 2018 through June 4, after 18 for the whole of 2017, according to Fitch Ratings. Firms from JPMorgan Chase & Co. to Fidelity International are warning to prepare for more. But with about 8.2 trillion yuan ($1.3 trillion) of domestic corporate and local-government securities due to mature in the coming 12 months, it’s an open question whether China is prepared to let chips fall where they may.

Authorities started shifting away from the old model of implicit guarantees for practically all debt securities in 2014, allowing defaults for the first time. The idea: tap market discipline to punish inefficient companies and encourage a more productive capital allocation. Given the massive size of the market — now more than $11 trillion, with a further half trillion or so in dollar bonds — it was always going to be a delicate transition. Where would the lines be drawn on who goes bust? A global-standard credit-ratings industry could hardly be engineered overnight. And who would staff credit-research teams and risk-control desks? Not to mention creating a derivatives market to hedge risks.

Great Wall of Maturities

A total of 8.2 trillion yuan of bonds are set to mature next 12 months

And with China’s door at its most open yet to overseas investors, the global spotlight is shining like never before on these securities.

“The pace is so much faster today, that’s one of the things that’s missed from many investors” looking at China’s capital markets, said Brendan Ahern, chief investment officer at Krane Funds Advisors, which is expanding its line of fixed income products as China’s bond market opens. “If you have to take your eye off China, it moves so quickly that it’s way ahead of you.”

As the U.S. Federal Reserve keeps raising interest rates, and China’s monetary overseers pursue a separate campaign to rein in shadow banking, the coming year may prove decisive in shifting investors away from relying on assumptions of state support — instead forcing them to value bonds based on how likely they are to get their money back.

And about time too, says Ashley Perrott, the Singapore-based head of pan-Asia fixed income at UBS Asset Management. Better differentiation between borrowers based on their risk has been long absent in China.

“It had to happen if they’re going to become a more mature market,” Perrott said. Despite its size, the near-absence of defaults in China’s market until relatively recently was one quirk that kept it out of sync with the rest of the world. There are many more that have made it idiosyncratic.

Pubblicato in: Problemia Energetici

Venezuela. Una occasione per chi amasse il gioco di azzardo.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2017-11-08.

2017-11-07__Venezuela__001

Il Venezuela è quello che è. Al momento attuale, anche se Mr Maduro si ritirasse, oppure fosse defenestrato, la situazione socio – economia sarebbe quella di una desertificazione. E non ci si illuda che ricostruire sia facile.

Cina e Russia hanno supportato Mr Maduro, anche politicamente, in funzione antiamericana e per mantenersi una testa di ponte in America Latina, ma hanno sempre concesso prestiti dietro garanzie petrolifere.

«Il Venezuela è troppo importante per Cina e Russia per poter dichiarare il default: la questione è senza dubbio spinosa, ma Mosca e Pechino saranno la vera rete di sicurezza per Caracas»

*

«Russia e Cina sono incentivate a finanziare solamente gli investimenti nel settore petrolifero al fine di poter rientrare dei prestiti concessi in precedenza: se il Venezuela riuscirà ad eseguire con successo la ristrutturazione suggerita da Maduro rinegoziando il debito con gli obbligazionisti, Cina e Russia sarebbero maggiormente incentivate nel sostenere Caracas, ma difficilmente concederanno prestiti al Venezuela al solo fine di rimborsare gli obbligazionisti»

*

Per quasi un quinquennio il Venezuela è stato un investimento che rendeva attorno al 20% a causa del grande rischio che comportava. Per chi avesse osato a quell’epoca è stato ottima fonte di guadagni. Ora però il rischio di ristrutturazione, ma anche di default, è incombente.

Ad oggi, è un investimento a livello di roulette.

I bond di stato hanno quotazioni da zero coupon, ed un rischio immanente e concreto di vanificarsi nel nulla.

Ma non è detto a priori.

Gli investitori usualmente sono molto cauti, ma ci sono anche investitori per i quali cifre che ad alcuni sembrano essere grandi sono relativamente piccole: rischiabili.

2017-11-07__Venezuela__002

Esaminando il Kurse del titolo USP17625AD98, preso ad esempio, si nota una vivace richiesta, per prezzi adeguati, si intende. Segno che non sono pochi quelli che ipotizzano la possibilità di guadagni.

Oggi  la quotazione è scesa a 22.50. Per chi volesse, buon gambling!

Venezuela, PDVSA: iniziato il trasferimento dei fondi

«La controllata statale venezuelana PDVSA ha comunicato di aver trasferito la maggior parte dei fondi necessari a pagare il debito relativo alle obbligazioni scadute nella passata settimana: il comunicato è stato diffuso in un momento di mercato sicuramente difficile, con gli investitori sempre più preoccupati da un possibile default della società.

La situazione, già di per se complicata, è stata peggiorata dalle parole del presidente Nicolas Maduro che ha recentemente rassicurato gli obbligazionisti sul fatto che il debito sarà saldato in toto ma, al contempo, ha sottolineato come i pagamenti dei debiti sovrani e di PDVSA futuri saranno ristrutturati e rifinanziati.

Sostanzialmente il presidente ha tentato di tranquillizzare gli investitori, ma le sue parole hanno sortito l’effetto opposto poichè gli investitori hanno interpretato la comunicazione come un preludio ad un futuro default.

Il debito il cui termine di pagamento scadeva nella passata settimana, secondo alcune fonti vicine a PDVSA, sarà risarcito in più tranche e non è ancora chiaro quando il denaro arriverà nelle casse degli obbligazionisti.

Il pagamento completo (1,169 miliardi di dollari di cui 1,121 miliardi in capitale e 47 milioni di dollari in interessi) era dovuto entro il 2 novembre.»


Commodities Trading. 2017-11-06. Petrolio, Venezuela: Too Big To Fail. Cina e Russia incrociano le dita

La volontà del presidente del Venezuela Nicolas Maduro di rinegoziare il debito da miliardi di dollari della nazione potrebbe complicare la vita a Cina e Russia, ma procediamo con ordine…

Nella giornata di giovedì Maduro ha colto di sorpresa gli obbligazionisti dichiarando di voler dare il via a quella che potrebbe essere una vera e propria ristrutturazione del debito del Venezuela (la scelta è caduta sull’uso del condizionale, in quanto se si tratterà di ristrutturazione o meno pare che non lo sappiano nemmeno in Venezuela; leggete questo articolo…) e le ripercussioni – negative, neanche a dirlo – sui bonds sono state praticamente immediate, ma l’intervento del presidente potrebbe essere stato calcolato a tavolino al fine di rassicurare quelli che sono i principali finanziatori di Maduro ed i clienti più importanti dell’industria petrolifera locale.

La controllata statale venezuelana PDVSA (Petroleos de Venezuela SA) controlla quelle che sono le maggiori riserve di Petrolio del mondo, ma la crisi senza precedenti che sta affrontando il paese ed i prezzi del greggio contenuti si sono rivelati elementi, insieme alle sanzioni USA, in grado di determinare un vero e proprio tracollo della produzione di greggio della società, che presenta ora un output ai livelli più bassi degli ultimi 4 anni.   Cina e Russia non hanno certo fatto l’errore di sottovalutare quanto accadeva in Venezuela ed entrambe le nazioni si sono tuffate nell’affaire Maduro investendo, sotto forma di finanziamenti, ben 60 miliardi di dollari destinati ad incrementare la produzione n loco, pagando in anticipo oltre un miliardo di barili di greggio.

“Il Venezuela è troppo importante per Cina e Russia per poter dichiarare il default: la questione è senza dubbio spinosa, ma Mosca e Pechino saranno la vera rete di sicurezza per Caracas” (Thomas Onley, Facts Global Energy).

In occasione di una conferenza tenutasi a Caracas, Nicolas Maduro ha dichiarato che il paese al collasso avrebbe tentato di incontrare i creditori al fine di discutere una rinegoziazione del debito, incluso quello di PDVSA.  La rinegoziazione in oggetto avviene in un momento cruciale per il Venezuela, che vede le sue entrate in corso di miglioramento grazie ad un prezzo del barile locale che balza a 52,9 dollari per barile, il livello più elevato da luglio 2015 ad oggi (il governo del Venezuela ha approvato il pagamento di un debito di PDVSA pari ad 1,1 miliardi di dollari) ma, al contempo, annovera riserve in valuta estera per soli 10 miliardi di dollari, un chiaro segno di come PDVSA potrebbe rimanere coinvolta in un processo di default molto disordinato…  

Nell’ormai lontano 2001 il Venezuela pompava 3 milioni di barili giornalieri di Petrolio mentre, nel mese di ottobre, l’output della nazione ammontava a soli 1,95 milioni di barili giornalieri.  L’affondare della produzione locale ha costretto PDVSA ad affidarsi sempre più sulle esportazioni al fine di poter miscelare il suo greggio di qualità notoriamente bassa con un Petrolio qualitativamente migliore e, come se non bastasse, la crisi economica che attanaglia Caracas ha fatto si che molte raffinerie operanti sul territorio nazionale siano oggetto di guasti e malfunzionamenti (quando non sottoposte a chiusura) a seguito degli scarsi investimenti che vanno inevitabilmente a pesare sulla manutenzione delle infrastrutture.

In forte calo (-35% tra agosto ed ottobre) le esportazioni verso gli Stati Uniti a seguito delle sanzioni imposte da Washington a seguito della violenta repressione che ha colpito gli attivisti “anti Maduro”.

L’inattività, in termini di acquisto, da parte delle raffinerie a stelle e strisce non è certo passata inosservata agli occhi vigili di Cina e Russia, con le spedizioni verso Pechino che nello stesso periodo si mostrano raddoppiate e con quelle verso la seconda (nelle vesti di Rosneft) più che triplicate.

Il reddito derivante dalle vendite a Cina e Russia è tuttavia limitato, poichè i barili spediti fanno parte di un rimborso alle due nazioni.

Cina e Russia

“Russia e Cina sono incentivate a finanziare solamente gli investimenti nel settore petrolifero al fine di poter rientrare dei prestiti concessi in precedenza: se il Venezuela riuscirà ad eseguire con successo la ristrutturazione suggerita da Maduro rinegoziando il debito con gli obbligazionisti, Cina e Russia sarebbero maggiormente incentivate nel sostenere Caracas, ma difficilmente concederanno prestiti al Venezuela al solo fine di rimborsare gli obbligazionisti…” (Francisco Monaldi, Rice University).

Rosneft ha finanziato PDVSA con circa 6 miliardi di dollari ed attualmente i vertici della società hanno dichiarato di non avere in programma ulteriori concessioni.

In cerca di ulteriori aiuti, PDVSA ha bussato alle porte di alcune oil trading houses, tra cui annoveriamo Trafigura, alla quale è stato chiesto il pagamento anticipato dell’80% di un contratto da 700 milioni di dollari.

Nessuna delle oil trading houses interpellate ha accettato di concludere affari con PDVSA; la raffineria Citgo (unità di raffinazione in America) è già stata posta a garanzia di alcune obbligazioni ed attualmente gli acquirenti abituali sono pronti a rivolgersi ad altri fornitori con le ovvie conseguenze negative del caso per il Venezuela.

L’attesa è ora per la giornata del 10 novembre, quando PDVSA sarà chiamata a rimborsare un altro prestito…