Pubblicato in: Cina, Diplomazia, Russia, Stati Uniti

Biden. Incerto se partecipare o meno al G20.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-08-23.

Biden 013

Il Presidente Joe Biden si trova di fronte a una scelta difficile dopo l’annuncio dell’Indonesia che Vladimir Putin e Xi Jinping parteciperanno al vertice del Gruppo dei 20 di quest’anno: partecipare a un evento con due leader che ha cercato di isolare, oppure saltare l’incontro e rinunciare alla possibilità di influenzarne l’esito. Mentre si prepara per l’incontro di novembre, Biden deve affrontare il fatto che nazioni come l’Indonesia si rifiutano di schierarsi sull’invasione dell’Ucraina, nonostante la sua richiesta di farlo, e hanno biasimato gli Stati Uniti e la Cina per l’aumento della tensione tra Washington e Pechino.

Jokowi ha respinto la richiesta di Biden che la comunità globale volti le spalle a Putin per la sua decisione di invadere l’Ucraina. Biden, che sostiene che Putin dovrebbe essere processato per crimini di guerra, aveva fatto pressioni affinché la Russia fosse rimossa dal G-20 dopo l’inizio dell’invasione, e i funzionari statunitensi avevano in precedenza esercitato pressioni sull’Indonesia affinché escludesse Putin dal vertice di Bali.

Se non vogliamo una guerra con la Russia o con la Cina, in ultima analisi, l’unico modo per risolvere la questione è la volontà di dialogare tra di noi e vedere se non ci sia un’opportunità per cercare di migliorare le nostre relazioni.

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«President Joe Biden is facing a difficult choice after Indonesia’s announcement that Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping will attend this year’s Group of 20 summit: join an event with two leaders he has sought to isolate, or skip the gathering and forgo a chance to shape its outcome. As he prepares for the November gathering, Biden must confront the fact that nations like Indonesia are refusing to pick sides over the Ukraine invasion despite his demand that they do so, and have faulted the US as much as China over increased tension between Washington and Beijing.»

«Jokowi was all but rejecting Biden’s demand that the global community turn its back on Putin over his decision to invade Ukraine. Biden, who says Putin should be tried for war crimes, had lobbied for Russia to be removed from the G-20 after the start of the invasion, and US officials had earlier pressured Indonesia to exclude Putin from the Bali summit.»

«If we don’t want war with Russia or with China, ultimately, the only way it’s going to be resolved is through a willingness to dialogue with one another and see whether or not there isn’t an opportunity to try to improve our relationships»

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Biden Faces G-20 Quandary Between Joining Putin or Staying Home

(Bloomberg) — President Joe Biden is facing a difficult choice after Indonesia’s announcement that Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping will attend this year’s Group of 20 summit: join an event with two leaders he has sought to isolate, or skip the gathering and forgo a chance to shape its outcome.

As he prepares for the November gathering, Biden must confront the fact that nations like Indonesia are refusing to pick sides over the Ukraine invasion despite his demand that they do so, and have faulted the US as much as China over increased tension between Washington and Beijing.

Either way, it was news Biden didn’t want to hear when Indonesian President Joko Widodo said Thursday that Putin and Xi would likely attend the gathering in Bali. That opens up the possibility of a direct encounter between Putin and Biden. Even if they avoid a handshake, the pair would quite literally share the stage during the meetings, photo sessions and ceremonial events that mark such a gathering. 

“Xi Jinping will come. President Putin has also told me he will come,” Jokowi, as the president is known, told Bloomberg News Editor-in-Chief John Micklethwait in an interview. “What we want is for this region is to be stable, peaceful, so that we can build economic growth. And I think not only Indonesia — Asian countries also want the same thing.”

With those remarks, Jokowi was all but rejecting Biden’s demand that the global community turn its back on Putin over his decision to invade Ukraine. Biden, who says Putin should be tried for war crimes, had lobbied for Russia to be removed from the G-20 after the start of the invasion, and US officials had earlier pressured Indonesia to exclude Putin from the Bali summit.

But it’s become more clear that nations like Indonesia don’t want to go along with that plan, just as they’ve refused to halt economic trade with Russia. In the same vein, they’ve grown more queasy about the US tensions with China, pointing to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s August visit to Taiwan as needlessly inflammatory.

“Biden is definitely going to go, and I think it’s a question of how confrontational he’s going to be,” said Melinda Haring, deputy director of the Atlantic Council’s Eurasia Center. “Boycotting it is not an option. We know that the administration thinks that that would be giving the summit away to Putin.” 

The White House elected not to force the issue on Friday. In a statement, the National Security Council reiterated Biden’s belief that Putin should not attend the summit while he wages war on Ukraine. But if he does, the NSC said, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy should also be allowed to participate.

That language opened up the possibility that Zelenskiy could attend virtually rather than attend in person. Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba did the same in July, addressing a meeting of G-20 foreign ministers virtually. 

“The bigger question is, if Zelenskiy were to speak at Bali, does that legitimize Putin’s presence there?” Haring said, predicting he may choose to skip the event altogether.

Even backers of the Biden administration questioned whether his confrontational approach would be effective.

“I don’t think the president should just try to avoid them,” Leon Panetta, a former defense secretary and CIA director under former President Barack Obama, said in an interview on Bloomberg Television’s Balance of Power with David Westin.  

“If we don’t want war with Russia or with China, ultimately, the only way it’s going to be resolved is through a willingness to dialogue with one another and see whether or not there isn’t an opportunity to try to improve our relationships,” Panetta said.

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