Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Stati Uniti

Biden. Il grande ostacolo sono i Consumatori americani. Tra quattro mesi c’è midterm.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-06-20.

2022-06-19__ Biden 001

Mentre l’amministrazione Biden pensa di ampliare le misure punitive nei confronti della Russia per l’invasione dell’Ucraina, un grosso ostacolo si trova più vicino a casa: il consumatore americano.

Gli automobilisti statunitensi si stanno mettendo in moto per le vacanze estive con prezzi della benzina che superano in media i 5 dollari al gallone per la prima volta nella storia. [Non si confondano i prezzi all’ingrosso con quelli alla pompa].

E l’aumento dei prezzi del petrolio e del gas naturale sta contribuendo a far salire l’inflazione al livello più alto degli ultimi quarant’anni, facendo lievitare i prezzi di cibo, elettricità e case.

L’inasprimento delle sanzioni contro la Russia, uno dei maggiori fornitori di petrolio e gas al mondo, probabilmente non farebbe che peggiorare la situazione.

Un divieto statunitense sulle importazioni di energia russa, un divieto parziale dell’UE sulle importazioni di energia.

Ma intensificare le azioni di guerra economica contro la Russia senza aumentare i prezzi non sarà facile.

Ma finora la Russia è stata in grado di trovare nuovi acquirenti scontando i prezzi.

L’India, ad esempio, il mese scorso ha quasi triplicato gli acquisti di greggio russo, mentre la Cina ha acquistato altri barili russi.

E a maggio le entrate petrolifere della Russia sono aumentate grazie all’aumento dei prezzi globali e alle esportazioni costanti di greggio che hanno compensato gli sconti.

Gli acquisti dell’India sono stati nel mirino di Washington per mesi, tanto che a marzo un funzionario statunitense ha avvertito che l’India potrebbe essere esposta a un “grande rischio” di inasprimento delle sanzioni se acquistasse petrolio in misura significativamente superiore ai livelli degli anni precedenti.

Ma i prezzi elevati dei carburanti e l’inflazione che essi contribuiscono a generare sono una vulnerabilità per Biden e per i suoi colleghi democratici all’approssimarsi delle elezioni dell’8 novembre.

* * * * * * *

In calce riportiamo una traduzione in lingua itaiana.

* * * * * * *

«As the Biden administration contemplates expanding punitive measures on Russia for its invasion of Ukraine, a big hurdle lies closer to home: the American consumer»

«U.S. drivers are embarking on summer vacations with gasoline prices averaging more than $5 a gallon for the first time ever»

«And rising oil and natural gas prices are helping to boost inflation to the highest level in four decades, driving up prices for food, electricity and housing»

«Tougher sanctions on Russia, among the world’s biggest oil and gas suppliers, would likely only make that worse»

«a U.S. ban on Russian energy imports, a partial EU ban on energy imports»

«But stepping up economic warfare actions on Russia without boosting prices will not be easy»

«But so far Russia has been able to find new buyers by discounting its prices»

«India, for example, last month nearly tripled its Russian crude purchases, while China has also picked up more Russian barrels»

«And in May, Russia’s oil revenues rose as higher global prices and steady crude exports outweighed those discounts»

«India’s purchases have been on Washington’s radar for months, with a U.S. official warning in March it could be exposed to “great risk” of stepped up sanctions if it purchases oil significantly beyond levels of previous years»

«But high fuel prices and the inflation it helps drive are a vulnerability for Biden and his fellow Democrats as the Nov. 8 elections approach»

* * * * * * *


With record pump prices, Biden hard-pressed to ramp up Russia sanctions

Washington, June 17 (Reuters) – As the Biden administration contemplates expanding punitive measures on Russia for its invasion of Ukraine, a big hurdle lies closer to home: the American consumer.

U.S. drivers are embarking on summer vacations with gasoline prices averaging more than $5 a gallon for the first time ever. And rising oil and natural gas prices are helping to boost inflation to the highest level in four decades, driving up prices for food, electricity and housing.

Tougher sanctions on Russia, among the world’s biggest oil and gas suppliers, would likely only make that worse.

“It’s like kicking them while they’re down,” said Ellen Wald, an energy historian and a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council think tank, said about the prospect of actions that could make prices higher for U.S. fuel consumers.

The United States and Europe have already imposed a raft of measures targeting Russia’s oil exports, the lifeblood of its economy and its war machine, including export controls, a U.S. ban on Russian energy imports, a partial EU ban on energy imports.

But the Biden administration is also mulling so-called secondary sanction to ramp up the pressure. U.S. officials, for example, are in talks with European and Asian allies about imposing potential price caps on purchases of Russian oil, Deputy Treasury Secretary Wally Adeyemo said on Tuesday

Some officials believe price caps are among several methods that could deepen Russia’s economic pain without spiking global oil markets further because only the revenues would be cut, not volumes of oil going to market.

“What is happening is less about how much Russian oil is going off the market, and more about Russia’s declining oil profits as result of being forced to sell at steep discounts,” a State Department spokesperson told Reuters.

But stepping up economic warfare actions on Russia without boosting prices will not be easy.

Russia, for example, could retaliate by holding oil from the market. That could immediately drive prices higher as the world’s oil producers have very little spare capacity after years of under-investment in oilfields and refineries.

“Every time there is talk about sanctions, the price goes up,” said Wald.

In late May, for example, global benchmark Brent crude rose to two-month highs of nearly $124 a barrel after the European Union backed a watered-down embargo on Russia’s oil shipments.

Officials at the Treasury Department, which administers sanctions, and the White House National Security Council did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

When asked when secondary sanctions could be placed on Russian oil purchases and under what circumstances, a U.S. official said nothing had been decided.

Western sanctions are expected to steadily cut into Russia’s crude exports next year, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA).

But so far Russia has been able to find new buyers by discounting its prices. India, for example, last month nearly tripled its Russian crude purchases, while China has also picked up more Russian barrels.  

And in May, Russia’s oil revenues rose as higher global prices and steady crude exports outweighed those discounts, the IEA said.

India’s purchases have been on Washington’s radar for months, with a U.S. official warning in March it could be exposed to “great risk” of stepped up sanctions if it purchases oil significantly beyond levels of previous years.  

                         PRICE CAP MANIPULATION RISK

Besides price caps, the United States may also consider sanctions on entities that provide insurance or services to Russian cargoes, where transactions exceed a set price per barrel.

But enforcement of such measures would take time and resources.

“I don’t think that’s realistic,” said Pavel Mulchanov, a managing director at Raymond James investment bank in Houston. “Oil is an extremely liquid and competitive market and there is no practical way of enforcing any type of price limit up, or down.”

Richard Nephew, a former sanctions official at the U.S. State Department under President Joe Biden and former President Barack Obama, was dubious about both methods, particularly about price caps, which have never been tried before on a producer of Russia’s size.

“The price cap is so at risk of being manipulated, and how do you verify that system?” Nephew said.

Instead, he believes Washington could work with banks in other consuming countries to put Russia’s revenue from oil sales into escrow accounts, money that Russia could only tap for approved goods and services.

But high fuel prices and the inflation it helps drive are a vulnerability for Biden and his fellow Democrats as the Nov. 8 elections approach.

A Rasmussen poll last month found that 83% of likely U.S. voters believe inflation will be an important issue in the elections in which Republicans hope to gain majorities in one or both chambers of Congress.

High fuel prices could cut appetite for aggressive action in Europe as well.

In light of soaring fuel costs, ClearView Energy Partners, a nonpartisan research group, said in a note to clients it is “skeptical that trans-Atlantic allies have sufficient political will to imminently cohere around ‘secondary’ sanctions on Russian petroleum exports.”

* * * * * * *


Con i prezzi record alla pompa, Biden ha difficoltà ad aumentare le sanzioni alla Russia

Washington, 17 giugno (Reuters) – Mentre l’amministrazione Biden sta valutando la possibilità di ampliare le misure punitive nei confronti della Russia per l’invasione dell’Ucraina, un grosso ostacolo si trova vicino a casa: il consumatore americano.

Gli automobilisti statunitensi si stanno imbarcando per le vacanze estive con prezzi della benzina in media superiori a 5 dollari al gallone per la prima volta nella storia. L’aumento dei prezzi del petrolio e del gas naturale sta contribuendo a far salire l’inflazione al livello più alto degli ultimi quarant’anni, facendo lievitare i prezzi di cibo, elettricità e case.

L’inasprimento delle sanzioni contro la Russia, uno dei maggiori fornitori di petrolio e gas al mondo, probabilmente non farebbe che peggiorare la situazione.

“È come prenderli a calci mentre sono a terra”, ha dichiarato Ellen Wald, storica dell’energia e senior fellow presso il think tank Atlantic Council, in merito alla prospettiva di azioni che potrebbero far aumentare i prezzi per i consumatori di carburante statunitensi.

Gli Stati Uniti e l’Europa hanno già imposto una serie di misure contro le esportazioni di petrolio della Russia, la linfa vitale della sua economia e della sua macchina da guerra, tra cui controlli sulle esportazioni, un divieto statunitense sulle importazioni di energia russa e un divieto parziale dell’UE sulle importazioni di energia.

Ma l’amministrazione Biden sta anche valutando le cosiddette sanzioni secondarie per aumentare la pressione. I funzionari statunitensi, ad esempio, stanno discutendo con gli alleati europei e asiatici sull’imposizione di potenziali tetti di prezzo sugli acquisti di petrolio russo, ha dichiarato martedì il vice segretario al Tesoro Wally Adeyemo.

Alcuni funzionari ritengono che i massimali di prezzo siano tra i vari metodi che potrebbero aggravare il dolore economico della Russia senza far impennare ulteriormente i mercati petroliferi globali, perché verrebbero tagliati solo i ricavi, non i volumi di petrolio immessi sul mercato.

“Quello che sta accadendo non riguarda tanto la quantità di petrolio russo che esce dal mercato, quanto piuttosto il calo dei profitti della Russia, costretta a vendere con forti sconti”, ha dichiarato a Reuters un portavoce del Dipartimento di Stato.

Ma intensificare le azioni di guerra economica contro la Russia senza aumentare i prezzi non sarà facile.

La Russia, ad esempio, potrebbe reagire bloccando il petrolio sul mercato. Questo potrebbe far salire immediatamente i prezzi, dato che i produttori mondiali di petrolio hanno pochissima capacità inutilizzata dopo anni di scarsi investimenti in giacimenti e raffinerie.

“Ogni volta che si parla di sanzioni, il prezzo sale”, ha detto Wald.

A fine maggio, ad esempio, il Brent di riferimento mondiale è salito ai massimi di due mesi, sfiorando i 124 dollari al barile, dopo che l’Unione Europea ha appoggiato un embargo attenuato sulle spedizioni di petrolio della Russia.

I funzionari del Dipartimento del Tesoro, che amministra le sanzioni, e del Consiglio di Sicurezza Nazionale della Casa Bianca non hanno risposto immediatamente a una richiesta di commento.

Alla domanda su quando potrebbero essere imposte sanzioni secondarie sugli acquisti di petrolio russo e in quali circostanze, un funzionario statunitense ha risposto che non è stato deciso nulla.

Secondo l’Agenzia Internazionale dell’Energia (AIE), le sanzioni occidentali dovrebbero ridurre costantemente le esportazioni di greggio della Russia l’anno prossimo.

Ma finora la Russia è riuscita a trovare nuovi acquirenti scontando i prezzi. L’India, ad esempio, il mese scorso ha quasi triplicato gli acquisti di greggio russo, mentre la Cina ha acquistato altri barili russi. 

A maggio, inoltre, le entrate petrolifere della Russia sono aumentate grazie all’aumento dei prezzi globali e alle esportazioni costanti di greggio che hanno compensato gli sconti, secondo l’AIE.

Gli acquisti dell’India sono stati nel mirino di Washington per mesi: a marzo un funzionario statunitense ha avvertito che l’India potrebbe essere esposta a un “grande rischio” di sanzioni più severe se acquistasse petrolio in misura significativamente superiore ai livelli degli anni precedenti. 

                         RISCHIO DI MANIPOLAZIONE DEI MASSIMALI DI PREZZO

Oltre ai massimali di prezzo, gli Stati Uniti potrebbero prendere in considerazione sanzioni su entità che forniscono assicurazioni o servizi ai carichi russi, laddove le transazioni superino un determinato prezzo al barile.

Ma l’applicazione di tali misure richiederebbe tempo e risorse.

“Non credo sia realistico”, ha dichiarato Pavel Mulchanov, amministratore delegato della banca d’investimento Raymond James di Houston. “Il petrolio è un mercato estremamente liquido e competitivo e non c’è modo pratico di imporre alcun tipo di limite ai prezzi, né al rialzo né al ribasso”.

Richard Nephew, ex funzionario del Dipartimento di Stato americano per le sanzioni sotto il presidente Joe Biden e l’ex presidente Barack Obama, si è detto dubbioso su entrambi i metodi, in particolare sui massimali di prezzo, che non sono mai stati sperimentati prima su un produttore delle dimensioni della Russia.

“Il price cap è così a rischio di essere manipolato, e come si fa a verificare questo sistema?”. Ha detto Nephew.

Secondo lui, invece, Washington potrebbe collaborare con le banche di altri Paesi consumatori per mettere le entrate russe derivanti dalle vendite di petrolio in conti vincolati, denaro che la Russia potrebbe utilizzare solo per beni e servizi approvati.

Ma i prezzi elevati del carburante e l’inflazione che essi contribuiscono a generare sono una vulnerabilità per Biden e i suoi colleghi democratici all’approssimarsi delle elezioni dell’8 novembre.

Un sondaggio Rasmussen del mese scorso ha rilevato che l’83% dei probabili elettori statunitensi ritiene che l’inflazione sarà un tema importante nelle elezioni in cui i repubblicani sperano di ottenere la maggioranza in una o entrambe le camere del Congresso.

I prezzi elevati del carburante potrebbero ridurre l’appetito per un’azione aggressiva anche in Europa.

Alla luce dell’impennata dei costi del carburante, ClearView Energy Partners, un gruppo di ricerca apartitico, ha dichiarato in una nota ai clienti di essere “scettico sul fatto che gli alleati transatlantici abbiano la volontà politica sufficiente per coalizzarsi nell’immediato intorno a sanzioni ‘secondarie’ sulle esportazioni di petrolio russo”.