Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Europa. La inflazione aumenta più degli stipendi. Si vive bruciando i risparmi. Poi?

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-06-14.

2022-06-08__Wages 001

                         In estrema sintesi.

– l’inflazione ha raggiunto l’8.1%

– gli stipendi sono mediamente aumentati del 2.3%

– al momento i Cittadini colmano la differenza consumando i 700 miliardi euro che avevano tesaurizzato

– già ora metà dei Contribuenti tedeschi ha dovuto ridurre il tenore di vita

– l’inflazione morderà le carni a risparmi finiti.

* * * * * * *

Sono conti molto facili, non serve nemmeno il pallottoliere.

Lagarde giace inerte, immobile, come se fosse in catalessi.

In calce alleghiamo una traduzione in lingua italiana.

* * * * * * *

«Powered by savings amassed during two years of coronavirus curbs, Europe’s consumers aren’t yet letting record inflation get in the way of a spending binge that’s underpinning the continent’s pandemic recovery»

«Recent data suggest the post-lockdown rebound in eating out and vacations is strong enough to offset manufacturing weakness»

«The strength of the consumer revival is fueling optimism that not only can a recession be avoided, but also stagflation akin to that seen in the 1970s»

«Before the war, we were thinking that the consumer will be the main driver of the continuation in the strong rebound of the European economy»

«Consumer prices are rising faster than wages in the euro area»

«households are sitting on a 700 billion-euro ($753 billion) cash mountain assembled during lockdowns»

«Inflation in the 19-member euro area hit 8.1% last month, intensifying cost-of-living concerns»

«The war in Ukraine could yet worsen the situation — especially once the summer is over and heating bills come to the fore again»

«Nearly half of all Germans says they can no longer afford their lifestyle because of inflation»

«Euro-zone consumption growth will be supported in the coming quarters by consumers spending part of the savings they accumulated during the pandemic, as well as by still healthy growth in employment»

«where wage growth continues to trail inflation and poorer households are being particularly squeezed»

«the uneven distribution of excess savings means their impact may be more limited than their size suggests»

* * * * * * *


Europe’s Savings-Fueled Consumers Are Facing Down Inflation

– Pent-up demand after pandemic offsets shock from Ukraine war

– Strong labor market, excess cash are supporting consumption

* * * * * * *

Powered by savings amassed during two years of coronavirus curbs, Europe’s consumers aren’t yet letting record inflation get in the way of a spending binge that’s underpinning the continent’s pandemic recovery.

Recent data suggest the post-lockdown rebound in eating out and vacations is strong enough to offset manufacturing weakness as Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and Covid-19 outbreaks in China roil supply chains once again.

The strength of the consumer revival is fueling optimism that not only can a recession be avoided, but also stagflation akin to that seen in the 1970s. That’s emboldening the European Central Bank to cement plans for a first interest-rate increase in more than a decade.

Before the war, “we were thinking that the consumer will be the main driver of the continuation in the strong rebound of the European economy,” said Sylvain Broyer, an economist at S&P Global Ratings in Frankfurt. “Has that picture changed a lot with the conflict? Maybe not as much as many believe because we still have a lot of tailwinds.”

                         Not Keeping Up

Consumer prices are rising faster than wages in the euro area

They include the end of large-scale virus restrictions and a growing share of people who are either vaccinated, recovered or both after the Omicron wave. Unemployment, meanwhile, is at a record low, and households are sitting on a 700 billion-euro ($753 billion) cash mountain assembled during lockdowns, according to Morgan Stanley.

Naysayers say pent-up demand can’t triumph over the fastest surge in prices since the euro’s creation: Inflation in the 19-member euro area hit 8.1% last month, intensifying cost-of-living concerns. The war in Ukraine could yet worsen the situation — especially once the summer is over and heating bills come to the fore again.

But scenes at European airports, starved of staff and overrun by passengers, show the price spike isn’t stopping those who can still afford foreign travel to take to the skies.

Companies, too, are bullish. Tourism giant TUI AG predicts it will turn a profit after two years of crisis, while Booking Holdings Inc. has raised the prospect of a record summer season.

“We haven’t been on vacation in three years because of Covid,” said Dagmar Giessen, who this month booked train tickets for a weeklong trip to the Bavarian lake resort of Murnau.

That’s despite “everything getting more expensive,” according to Giessen, who runs an art shop with her husband in central Frankfurt. “We’ve noticed we can also live more simply. We don’t really have to cut back yet, but it may come to that.”

Nearly half of all Germans says they can no longer afford their lifestyle because of inflation. But there are signs that cutbacks in spending are only happening in certain areas, with Europeans increasingly splashing out on services.   

“We don’t think the current weakness in goods consumption implies total consumption will contract in the coming quarters,” said Aline Schuiling, an economist at ABN Amro. “Euro-zone consumption growth will be supported in the coming quarters by consumers spending part of the savings they accumulated during the pandemic, as well as by still healthy growth in employment.”

It’s that kind of prioritizing that ECB officials like Chief Economist Philip Lane cite as a factor allowing the conclusion of stimulus and years of negative interest rates. Business surveys by S&P Global show the euro area remaining “encouragingly resilient,” thanks largely to a buoyant services sector, particularly tourism and recreation.

The war and its knock-on effects will still ripple through Europe’s economy, where wage growth continues to trail inflation and poorer households are being particularly squeezed. But despite all that, the European Commission predicts euro-zone expansion 2.7% in 2022.

What’s more, the boost from savings being unleashed may yet last several months. While down from its pandemic peak, savings’ share of monthly income remained far above the long-term average as of late last year and will boost consumption as it slides further.

The trend is buttressed by an unemployment rate of 6.8%, assuaging worries over job security sparked by the Ukraine conflict, according to Dean Turner, an economist at UBS Global Wealth Management.

“History tells us that the longer these unfortunate episodes persist, the less of an impact it tends to have on confidence,” he said. “If people fear they’re going to lose their job, that has a much bigger impact on them reining in spending.”

Morgan Stanley economist Jens Eisenschmidt cautions that the uneven distribution of excess savings means their impact may be more limited than their size suggests. Still, along with the pandemic reopening and the tight labor market, they’re one of “the three factors that we say are separating us from sliding into recession.”

* * * * * * *


I consumatori europei alimentati dal risparmio stanno affrontando l’inflazione

– La domanda in crescita dopo la pandemia compensa lo shock della guerra in Ucraina

– Il forte mercato del lavoro e l’eccesso di liquidità sostengono i consumi

* * * * * * *

Alimentati dai risparmi accumulati durante i due anni di contenimento del coronavirus, i consumatori europei non hanno ancora lasciato che l’inflazione record ostacolasse il ritmo di spesa che sta sostenendo la ripresa del continente dalla pandemia.

I dati più recenti suggeriscono che il rimbalzo dei pasti fuori casa e delle vacanze è abbastanza forte da compensare la debolezza del settore manifatturiero, mentre l’invasione russa dell’Ucraina e le epidemie di Covid-19 in Cina mettono nuovamente a dura prova le catene di approvvigionamento.

La forza della ripresa dei consumi alimenta l’ottimismo sulla possibilità di evitare non solo una recessione, ma anche una stagflazione simile a quella degli anni Settanta. Questo sta incoraggiando la Banca Centrale Europea a consolidare i piani per il primo aumento dei tassi di interesse in più di un decennio.

Prima della guerra, “pensavamo che i consumatori sarebbero stati il principale motore della continuazione della forte ripresa dell’economia europea”, ha dichiarato Sylvain Broyer, economista di S&P Global Ratings a Francoforte. “Il quadro è cambiato molto con il conflitto? Forse non così tanto come molti credono, perché abbiamo ancora molti vantaggi”.

                         Non si tiene il passo

Nell’area dell’euro i prezzi al consumo crescono più rapidamente dei salari

Tra questi, la fine delle restrizioni su larga scala per il virus e una quota crescente di persone vaccinate, guarite o entrambe dopo l’ondata di Omicron. La disoccupazione, nel frattempo, è ai minimi storici e le famiglie sono sedute su una montagna di contanti da 700 miliardi di euro (753 miliardi di dollari) accumulata durante le serrate, secondo Morgan Stanley.

I detrattori dicono che la domanda repressa non può trionfare sulla più rapida impennata dei prezzi dalla creazione dell’euro: L’inflazione nell’area dell’euro a 19 membri ha raggiunto l’8,1% il mese scorso, intensificando le preoccupazioni sul costo della vita. La guerra in Ucraina potrebbe ancora peggiorare la situazione, soprattutto quando l’estate sarà finita e le bollette del riscaldamento torneranno a farsi sentire.

Ma le scene negli aeroporti europei, affamati di personale e invasi dai passeggeri, dimostrano che l’impennata dei prezzi non impedisce a chi può ancora permettersi un viaggio all’estero di prendere il volo.

Anche le aziende sono ottimiste. Il gigante del turismo TUI AG prevede di tornare in attivo dopo due anni di crisi, mentre Booking Holdings Inc. ha annunciato una stagione estiva da record.

“Non andiamo in vacanza da tre anni a causa del Covid”, ha dichiarato Dagmar Giessen, che questo mese ha prenotato i biglietti del treno per un viaggio di una settimana nella località bavarese di Murnau.

Questo nonostante “tutto sia diventato più costoso”, secondo Giessen, che gestisce un negozio d’arte con il marito nel centro di Francoforte. “Abbiamo notato che possiamo anche vivere in modo più semplice. Non siamo ancora costretti a fare dei tagli, ma potrebbe succedere”.

Quasi la metà dei tedeschi afferma di non potersi più permettere il proprio stile di vita a causa dell’inflazione. Ma ci sono segnali che indicano che i tagli alle spese stanno avvenendo solo in alcuni settori, con gli europei che spendono sempre di più per i servizi.  

“Non pensiamo che l’attuale debolezza dei consumi di beni implichi una contrazione dei consumi totali nei prossimi trimestri”, ha dichiarato Aline Schuiling, economista di ABN Amro. “La crescita dei consumi della zona euro sarà sostenuta nei prossimi trimestri dai consumatori che spenderanno parte dei risparmi accumulati durante la pandemia, oltre che da una crescita ancora sana dell’occupazione”.

È questo tipo di priorità che i funzionari della BCE, come il capo economista Philip Lane, citano come fattore che ha permesso la conclusione degli stimoli e anni di tassi di interesse negativi. Le indagini sulle imprese condotte da S&P Global mostrano che l’area dell’euro rimane “incoraggiantemente resiliente”, grazie soprattutto al buon andamento del settore dei servizi, in particolare del turismo e delle attività ricreative.

La guerra e i suoi effetti a catena si ripercuoteranno ancora sull’economia europea, dove la crescita dei salari continua a essere inferiore all’inflazione e le famiglie più povere sono particolarmente schiacciate. Ma nonostante ciò, la Commissione europea prevede un’espansione della zona euro del 2,7% nel 2022.

Inoltre, la spinta del risparmio che si sta liberando potrebbe durare ancora diversi mesi. Anche se in calo rispetto al picco pandemico, alla fine dello scorso anno la quota di risparmio sul reddito mensile è rimasta ben al di sopra della media di lungo periodo e favorirà i consumi in caso di ulteriore calo.

Secondo Dean Turner, economista di UBS Global Wealth Management, questa tendenza è sostenuta da un tasso di disoccupazione del 6,8%, che placa le preoccupazioni sulla sicurezza del lavoro suscitate dal conflitto in Ucraina.

“La storia ci dice che più a lungo persistono questi episodi sfortunati, meno impatto tendono ad avere sulla fiducia”, ha affermato. “Se le persone temono di perdere il lavoro, questo ha un impatto molto maggiore sul contenimento delle spese”.

L’economista di Morgan Stanley Jens Eisenschmidt avverte che la distribuzione disomogenea dei risparmi in eccesso significa che il loro impatto potrebbe essere più limitato di quanto le loro dimensioni suggeriscano. Tuttavia, insieme alla riapertura della pandemia e alla tenuta del mercato del lavoro, sono uno dei “tre fattori che, a nostro avviso, ci separano dallo scivolare in recessione”.