Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Cina, Devoluzione socialismo, India, Regno Unito, Russia, Stati Uniti

Mondo. Proiezioni delle nazioni al 2050. Il trionfo dell’oriente. – Bloomberg.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2022-01-04.

2022-01-01__ Proiezini GDP PPP al 2050 001

Pwc ha reso disponibile il report The World in 20250.

È un testo particolarmente lungo, per cui ne forniremo solo alcuni abstract.

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«In our latest World in 2050 report we present economic growth projections for 32 of the largest economies in the world, accounting for around 84% of global GDP »

«But we expect a slowdown in global growth after 2020, as the rate of expansion in China and some other major emerging economies moderates to a more sustainable long-term rate, and as working age population growth slows in many large economies»

«China has already overtaken the US in 2014 to become the largest economy in purchasing power parity (PPP2) terms»

«In market exchange rate (MER) terms, we project China to overtake the US in 2028 despite its projected growth slowdown»

«The US could be down to third place in the global GDP rankings while the EU27’s share of world GDP could fall below 10% by 2050»

«We project new emerging economies like Mexico and Indonesia to be larger than the UK and France by 2030 (in PPP terms) while Turkey could become larger than Italy. Nigeria and Vietnam could be the fast growing large economies over the period to 2050»

«These are based on a model that takes account of projected trends in demographics, capital investment, education levels and technological progress»

«India’s share of world GDP in PPP terms could increase steadily from just under 7% in 2014 to around 13.5% in 2050»

«Our model projects that Indonesia (9th in 2014) and Brazil (7th in 2014) could rise to amongst the top 5 largest economies by 2050 in terms of GDP at PPPs»

Nota. La proiezione della EU27 deriva da un conto aggiornato.

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Questa Tabella conferma sostanzialmente le precedenti.

Entro il 2050, ossia tra trenta anni, il blocco asiatico avrà a livello mondiale il predominio economico indiscusso.

Ciò che Bloomberg denomina ‘Free Economies’ altro non sarebbe che l’enclave liberal socialista occidentale, sempre poi che a tale data esista ancora. A tale data il suo spopolamento degli autoctoni sarà altamente drammatico.

L’occidente è destinato a scomparire, non tanto per la aggressività dei cinesi quanto piuttosto per la sua ideologia suicida.

Ci si metta quindi l’anima in pace. Quello delineato sarà il mondo i cui vivranno i nostri figli e nipoti.

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Only 26% of World GDP to Come From Free Economies in 2050. – Bloomberg

«                       Highlights

In our latest World in 2050 report we present economic growth projections for 32 of the largest economies in the world, accounting for around 84% of global GDP.

We project the world economy to grow at an average of just over 3% per annum in the period 2014 – 50, doubling in size by 2037 and nearly tripling by 2050.

But we expect a slowdown in global growth after 2020, as the rate of expansion in China and some other major emerging economies moderates to a more sustainable long-term rate, and as working age population growth slows in many large economies.

The global economic power shift1 away from the established advanced economies in North America, Western Europe and Japan will continue over the next 35 years. China has already overtaken the US in 2014 to become the largest economy in purchasing power parity (PPP2) terms. In market exchange rate (MER) terms, we project China to overtake the US in 2028 despite its projected growth slowdown.

India has the potential to become the second largest economy in the world by 2050 in PPP terms (third in MER terms), although this requires a sustained programme of structural reforms3.

We project new emerging economies like Mexico and Indonesia to be larger than the UK and France by 2030 (in PPP terms) while Turkey could become larger than Italy. Nigeria and Vietnam could be the fast growing large economies over the period to 2050.

Colombia, Poland and Malaysia all possess great potential for sustainable long-term growth in the coming decades according to our country experts.

At the same time, recent experience has re-emphasised that relatively rapid growth is not guaranteed for emerging economies, as indicated by recent problems in Russia and Brazil, for example. It requires sustained and effective investment in infrastructure and improving political, economic, legal and social institutions. It also requires remaining open to the free flow of technology, ideas and talented people that are key drivers of economic catch-up growth.

We think that overdependence on natural resources could also impede long term growth in some countries (e.g. Russia, Nigeria and Saudi Arabia) unless they can diversify their economies.

                         Key findings: GDP projections to 2050

This report updates our long-term global economic growth projections4, which were last published in January 2013. These are based on a model that takes account of projected trends in demographics, capital investment, education levels and technological progress. We have updated both the base year data (from 2011 to 2014) and future assumptions on the key drivers of growth, as well as expanding the coverage of the model from 24 to 32 countries (now accounting for around 84% of total world GDP at PPP exchange rates).

The changing league table of world GDP in PPP terms is shown in Table 1. China is already the world’s biggest economy in PPP terms, and we project that India could have the potential to just overtake the US as the world’s second largest economy by 2050 in PPP terms (although the projected difference is small relative to the margin of uncertainty around any such projections).

We project that the gap between the three biggest economies (i.e. China, India and the US) and the rest of the world will widen over the next few decades. In 2014, the third biggest economy in PPP terms (India) is around 50% larger than the fourth biggest economy (Japan). In 2050, the third biggest economy in PPP terms (the US) is projected to be approximately 240% larger than the fourth biggest economy (Indonesia).

The rise of Indonesia and Nigeria through the world rankings throughout the period to 2050 is very striking: Indonesia rises from 9th in 2014 to 4th in 2050, and Nigeria rises from 20th in 2014 to 9th in 2050.

However, average income per capita (i.e. GDP per capita) will still be significantly higher in the advanced economies than the emerging economies in 2050. The current gap in income per capita between developing and developed countries is just too large to bridge fully over this period.»