Pubblicato in: Cina, Devoluzione socialismo

Cina. Silura ed affonda con scherno COP26. Costruirà nuove centrali a carbone e petrolio.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-10-13.

2021-10-13__ Scherno 001

COP26, ‘Glasgow climate summit’ si preannuncia essere un fiasco memorabile

Blocco europeo. Prezzi degli energetici fuori controllo. Stagflazione in casa.

Asia. Trend energetici. Il carbone domina nella produzione di corrente elettrica.

G20. Nessun paese ha adempiuto gli Accordi di Parigi del 2015.

Blocco Europeo. Il +250% del natural gas manda in fumo le ambizioni green.

Coronavirus seppellisce l’EU Green Deal. Riposa con i fu liberal.

Timmermans prende atto che il ‘Clima’ è morto stecchito. Originale il mezzo.

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«His announcement will cause alarm ahead of the COP26 summit in Glasgow in two weeks, and is a major blow to the UK’s plans for securing a global agreement on phasing out coal»

«China makes a mockery of climate targets as it plans to build more coal power stations and ramp up oil and gas exploration to solve its energy crisis just weeks ahead of COP26 summit»

«Beijing plans to build new coal-fired plants and intensify oil and gas exploration»

«China is making a mockery of climate targets as it announced plans to build more coal-fired power plants and increase oil and gas exploration, just weeks ahead of the COP26 summit where world leaders were expected to agree to ambitious emission cuts»

«Beijing’s National Energy Commission said late Tuesday it is important ‘to build advanced coal-fired power plants’ and intensify domestic oil and gas exploration»

«Li Keqiang, the Chinese premier, also hinted that a pledge to cap carbon emissions by 2030 – which already lags behind commitments made by other major economies – could be torn up»

«His announcement will cause alarm ahead of the COP26 summit in Glasgow in two weeks, and is a major blow to the UK’s plans for securing a global agreement on phasing out coal. »

«His announcement will cause alarm ahead of the COP26 summit in Glasgow in two weeks, and is a major blow to the UK’s plans for securing a global agreement on phasing out coal»

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L’enclave liberal occidentale ha per anni coperto la Cina di ogni sorta di calunnie pretestuose e di pacchiane menzogne.

Negli ultimi tempi ha fatto marcia indietro, ma troppo tardi. I cinesi hanno ottima memoria e sanno essere taglienti peggio dei bisturi.

Cina. Kontrordine Kompagni. I cinesi sono gente santa, morigerata, cui nulla può essere imputato.

Bene. Adesso la Cina contraccambia con gli interessi: silura ed affonda COP26 che tanto sarebbe stata a cuore ai liberal.

E lo fa anche facendosi scherno di loro.

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China makes a mockery of climate targets as it plans to build more coal power stations and ramp up oil and gas exploration to solve its energy crisis just weeks ahead of COP26 summit.

– Beijing plans to build new coal-fired plants and intensify oil and gas exploration after being hit by blackouts la

– China had committed to capping carbon emissions by 2030 but Premier hinted pledge could be scrapped

– Move will cause alarm ahead of the COP26 summit in Glasgow in two weeks, and is a major blow to the UK’s plans for securing a global agreement on phasing out coal

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China is making a mockery of climate targets as it announced plans to build more coal-fired power plants and increase oil and gas exploration, just weeks ahead of the COP26 summit where world leaders were expected to agree to ambitious emission cuts.    

Beijing’s National Energy Commission said late Tuesday it is important ‘to build advanced coal-fired power plants’ and intensify domestic oil and gas exploration after the country was hit by blackouts last week and that China would rethink emissions targets.

Li Keqiang, the Chinese premier, also hinted that a pledge to cap carbon emissions by 2030 – which already lags behind commitments made by other major economies – could be torn up. 

His announcement will cause alarm ahead of the COP26 summit in Glasgow in two weeks, and is a major blow to the UK’s plans for securing a global agreement on phasing out coal. 

Amidst a global energy crisis caused as economies reopen post-Covid, China has also ordered its coal mines to raise their annual output capacity to 55.3 million tonnes while India has also ordered its own mines to increase production. 

China is already the world’s largest polluter, with more than 50% of its energy coming from coal, which is considered the most-polluting source.  

The UN has said if global emissions are not cut by 50% by 2030, the climate crisis will lead to further wide-ranging and more destructive natural disasters, such as flood and drought.

But with every passing day, that goal seems to be moving further out of reach – with the boss of a South African coal mine saying today that he sees demand for coal continuing for the next two decades at least.

Beijing had previously committed to hitting peak emissions in 2030 and being carbon neutral by 2060 – a target which would involve the closure of more than 600 coal plants. 

But Chinese Premier Li Keqiang hinted that this commitment may be up for debate as he said Beijing will build more coal-fired plants as China seeks to enhance the ‘capacity for energy self-supply’ and create a ‘modern energy system’.    

Keqiang said: ‘Energy security should be the premise on which a modern energy system is built and the capacity for energy self-supply should be enhanced,’ the Guardian reported.

‘Given the predominant place of coal in the country’s energy and resource endowment, it is important to optimise the layout for the coal production capacity, build advanced coal-fired power plants as appropriate in line with development needs, and continue to phase out outdated coal plants in an orderly fashion. 

‘Domestic oil and gas exploration will be intensified.’  

China has been suffering from widespread power outages that have shut factories and hit production and global supply chains amid a global energy shortage that has seen demand for fossil fuels soar despite the UN warning of the devastating effects.

July Ndlovu, the boss of the South African coal mine Thungela, said the demand for coal production will last for the next two decades.  

Inlovu told Radio 4’s Today programme that while Europe and the US will be at the forefront of the transition from coal toward renewable energies, countries such as China and India – which have far younger fossil fuel infrastructure – will follow much later. 

He said: ‘You can considerably see the US and Europe returning their coal plants earlier and then the rest of the developing economies on the back end of that.

‘Clearly there is uncertainty on how long that will be, but we certainly see demand lasting until into the next decade-and-a-half or even two decades.’

Keqiang added officials want to gather new evidence to rethink a roadmap for reaching peak emissions, with the deadline likely to be extended beyond 2030. 

The premier said he had ordered ‘in-depth studies and calculations in light of the recent handling of electricity and coal supply strains, to put forward a phased timetable and roadmap for peaking carbon emissions.’  

It came after blackouts hit cities across China last week amid a spike in demand for energy around the globe. 

The country was so short on power that cities were hit by blackouts with factories forced to close or else open for just a couple of hours per week.

The crisis, which began biting a fortnight ago, was caused by the cost of coal spiking as the economy reopened post-Covid, meaning power stations were operating at a loss and began to shut down. As a result, China’s imports of coal surged by 76% in September.

Power outages were reported in southern Guangdong province, but are most severe in the north eastern manufacturing hubs of Heilongjiang, Jilin and Liaoning.

And an additional 16 provinces were forced to ration energy due to a shortage in supply, but avoided full-scale blackouts. 

In response, Shanxi – China’s biggest coal-producing region – ordered its 98 coal mines to raise their annual output capacity by 55.3 million tonnes and allowed 51 coal mines that had hit their maximum annual production levels to keep producing.

In China’s No. 2 coal region, Inner Mongolia, 72 mines were told that they could operate at higher capacities immediately, provided they ensure safe production. 

But incessant rain has flooded 60 mines in Shanxi, as four mines with a combined annual output capacity of 4.8 million tonnes remained shut in the region.

The flooding has worsened the supply outlook, with electricity shortages and rationing expected to continue into early next year.  

Former UK Labour leader Ed Miliband, who now serves as the Shadow Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, said China must ‘step up’ in reducing their emissions but also criticized the UK government for not putting pressure on Beijing to make them act.

Miliband told the Radio 4’s Today Programme: ‘The Chinese need to step up and it is a problem. This is happening because the UK haven’t built the coalition to put the pressure on countries like China to make them step up.  

He added: ‘The Paris Agreement succeeded because we had an alliance of developing and vulnerable countries and developing countries like ours that put maxiumum pressure on the biggest emitters like China. 

‘Now the problem is, because the (UK) government hasn’t had a proper strategy for this COP23 summit, we haven’t built that coalition.’

It comes amid a wider energy crisis that has seen shortages and soaring prices in Europe, India and China.

In response, India is ramping up its coal production from 1.94 million to 2 million tonnes per day within a week following supply shortages which caused some utility providers to resort to unscheduled power cuts, reports The Statesman

India was said to have been close to running out of coal, but government sources said coal-powered plans are maintaining stock for five days. The sources said in a month’s time, the levels of coals will be back to usual levels.  

Coal accounts for nearly 70 percent of India’s electricity generation and around three-quarters of the fossil fuel is mined domestically. 

As Asia’s third-largest economy rebounds following a coronavirus wave, heavy monsoon rains have flooded coal mines and disrupted transport networks, leading to a sharp rise in prices for coal buyers, including power stations. 

International coal prices have also soared.  

Even before the current energy crisis erupted, the world was far behind on efforts to avert catastrophic climate change.

The United Nations estimates that global emissions will be 16 per cent higher in 2030 than they were in 2010 based on countries’ current pledges.

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China’s plan to build more coal-fired plants deals blow to UK’s Cop26 ambitions.

Renewed commitment to coal could scupper Britain’s aim to secure global phase-out pact at climate summit.

China plans to build more coal-fired power plants and has hinted that it will rethink its timetable to slash emissions, in a significant blow to the UK’s ambitions for securing a global agreement on phasing out coal at the Cop26 climate summit in Glasgow.

In a statement after a meeting of Beijing’s National Energy Commission, the Chinese premier, Li Keqiang, stressed the importance of regular energy supply, after swathes of the country were plunged into darkness by rolling blackouts that hit factories and homes.

While China has published plans to reach peak carbon emissions by 2030, the statement hinted that the energy crisis had led the Communist party to rethink the timing of this ambition, with a new “phased timetable and roadmap for peaking carbon emissions”.

China has previously set out plans to be carbon neutral by 2060, with emissions peaking by 2030, a goal analysts say would involve shutting 600 coal-fired power plants. President Xi Jinping has also pledged to stop building coal plants abroad.

“Energy security should be the premise on which a modern energy system is built and and the capacity for energy self-supply should be enhanced,” the statement said.

“Given the predominant place of coal in the country’s energy and resource endowment, it is important to optimise the layout for the coal production capacity, build advanced coal-fired power plants as appropriate in line with development needs, and continue to phase out outdated coal plants in an orderly fashion. Domestic oil and gas exploration will be intensified.”

Beijing’s ambitions for carbon dioxide output are seen as critical in the push to achieve global net zero carbon emissions by 2050 and fulfil the 2015 Paris agreement to limit average temperature rises to 1.5C. But Li said Beijing wanted to gather new evidence on when its peak emissions would be reached.

The statement said he had commissioned “in-depth studies and calculations in light of the recent handling of electricity and coal supply strains, to put forward a phased timetable and roadmap for peaking carbon emissions”.

Li’s rhetoric follows reports that China has ordered its two top coal-producing regions, Shanxi and Inner Mongolia, to combat the country’s power supply crisis.

Beijing’s renewed embrace of coal – apparently at odds with Xi’s state climate ambitions – are likely to cause alarm in the run-up to Cop26.

Alok Sharma, the UK’s president-designate of Cop26, has said an agreement to phase out coal power is a key aim of the summit.

George Magnus, a research associate at Oxford University’s China Centre and the author of Red Flags: Why Xi’s China Is in Jeopardy, said Beijing had been forced to revise its plans in the face of the reality of economic problems and power outages.

“China has stumbled into an energy crisis in much the same way the rest of us have done but it is exacerbated by the fact that the grid and the electricity companies are subject to price controls and cannot pass the prices on,” he said. “Many have decided to shut down production and they have had a lot of power outages for households and companies. This has come at a very bad moment in China, on top of [collapsed property giant] Evergrande and the property bust.

“They have basically cycled back on their coal policy. With Cop26 coming up, there is a lot of talk about how committed the Chinese are to net zero goals by 2050 but this is another setback. It has happened before, when the economy was weaker during the pandemic, that they relaxed restrictions on coal capacity. Now they are doing it again.

“If the new relaxations last a few weeks, it might not matter so much. If it lasts into 2022 as China strives to avoid bad economic outcomes ahead of its key CCP 20th party congress in November 2022, climate policy optimists might have to rethink for sure.”

Concern about China’s coal ambitions come on the eve of the publication of the International Energy Agency’s annual world energy outlook, which says much greater action is required globally if the world is to reach net zero by 2050.

The IEA said its hopes of speeding up the clean energy transition to meet the target involved a “rapid” reduction in the amount of coal burned to produce electricity.

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Dalla Cina un duro colpo alla Cop26: “Costruiremo nuove centrali a carbone”

“Esplorazione nazionale di petrolio e gas sarà intensificata”.

La Cina prevede di costruire più centrali elettriche a carbone e ha lasciato intendere che rivedrà il suo calendario per ridurre le emissioni, in un duro colpo alle ambizioni del Regno Unito di garantire un accordo globale sull’eliminazione graduale del carbone al vertice sul clima Cop26 di Glasgow.

In una dichiarazione dopo una riunione della Commissione nazionale per l’energia di Pechino, il premier cinese Li Keqiang ha sottolineato l’importanza di un approvvigionamento energetico regolare, dopo che fasce del Paese sono sprofondate nell’oscurità a causa dei blackout che hanno colpito fabbriche e abitazioni.

Mentre la Cina ha pubblicato piani per raggiungere il picco delle emissioni di carbonio entro il 2030, la dichiarazione ha suggerito che la crisi energetica ha portato il Partito comunista a ripensare i tempi di questa ambizione, con un nuovo “calendario graduale e una tabella di marcia per il picco delle emissioni di carbonio”.

La Cina, ricorda il Guardian, aveva precedentemente stabilito piani per raggiungere la neutralità di emissioni di carbonio entro il 2060, con un picco entro il 2030, un obiettivo che secondo gli analisti implicherebbe la chiusura di 600 centrali elettriche a carbone. Anche il presidente Xi Jinping si era impegnato a porre fine alla costruzione di centrali a carbone.

“La sicurezza energetica dovrebbe essere la premessa su cui si costruisce un moderno sistema energetico e la capacità di autoapprovvigionamento energetico dovrebbe essere potenziata”, si afferma nella nota di Pechino.

“Dato il ruolo predominante del carbone nella dotazione energetica e di risorse del paese, è importante ottimizzare il layout per la capacità di produzione del carbone, costruire centrali elettriche a carbone avanzate in linea con le esigenze di sviluppo e continuare a eliminare gradualmente e in modo ordinato gli impianti obsoleti per il carbone. L’esplorazione nazionale di petrolio e gas sarà intensificata”, è stato aggiunto.

Le ambizioni di Pechino per la produzione di anidride carbonica sono considerate fondamentali nella spinta per raggiungere emissioni globali zero di carbonio entro il 2050 e rispettare l’accordo di Parigi del 2015 per limitare l’aumento della temperatura media a 1,5°C. Ma Li ha detto che Pechino intende raccogliere nuove prove su quando sarà raggiunto il suo picco di emissioni. Nella dichiarazione si afferma infatti che sono stati commissionati “studi e calcoli approfonditi alla luce della recente gestione dei problemi di fornitura di elettricità e carbone, per proporre un calendario graduale e una tabella di marcia per il picco delle emissioni di carbonio”.