Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Devoluzione socialismo, Regno Unito, Unione Europea

Inflazione. Sorella miseria si fa precedere dalla comare inflazione. Adesso anche l’UK.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2021-05-19.

2021-05-19__ Inflazione 001

I governi dell’enclave liberal socialista occidentale ostentano una serena e pacata calma.

Ma i mercati non hanno mica digerito gli ultimi macrodati in arrivo.

Le parole sono parole, ma i numeri sono numeri.

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Gran Bretagna – Indice dei principali prezzi di produzione (Annuale)

Office for National Statistics: +2.5%

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Gran Bretagna – Indice dei prezzi al dettaglio (Annuale)

Office for National Statistics: +2.9%

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Tutto questo dopo che negli Stati Uniti l’inflazione era scattata al +4.2%.

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«Inflation fears are weighing ever more heavily on markets»

«On Wednesday (May 19) the UK became the latest country to report numbers that worried traders. Inflation there more than doubled in April, rising by 1.5%»

«That was higher than analysts expected, and up from 0.7% the month before»

«Clothing and footwear prices surged as shops reopened. A jump in electricity and gas charges also added to the rise»

«The Bank of England hopes it’s just a temporary blip, but says price rises will go above its 2% target»

«But some investors are taking money out of riskier assets, just in case that’s not right»

«Markets were braced for a hot consumer inflation report, but nowhere near the 4.2% headline increase reported for April»

«U.K. inflation more than doubled in April, the Office for National Statistics said Wednesday. Consumer prices rose by 1.5% after a 0.7% climb in March»

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Gli investitori non hanno la benché minima intenzione di ritrovarsi con in mano un pugno di mosche.

Nessuno intende fare allarmismi, ma solo dopo aver portato il peculio in luogo sicuro.

Cina. Aprile21. Investimenti Diretti Esteri +38.60%.

L’inflazione è democratica: colpisce tutti, anche quelli che ritenevano di essere intoccabili.

Ma siamo solo agli inizi: nessuno si illuda.

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Inflation fears weigh on stocks, oil

Inflation fears are weighing ever more heavily on markets.

On Wednesday (May 19) the UK became the latest country to report numbers that worried traders.

Inflation there more than doubled in April, rising by 1.5%.

That was higher than analysts expected, and up from 0.7% the month before.

Clothing and footwear prices surged as shops reopened.

A jump in electricity and gas charges also added to the rise.

The Bank of England hopes it’s just a temporary blip, but says price rises will go above its 2% target.

There’s a similar story in the euro zone, where numbers Wednesday showed annual inflation hitting 1.6%.

It all mirrors signs of rising prices in the U.S., and comes as a recovering global economy stokes demand.

That has markets worried that central banks will soon have to start tightening policy.

Europe’s benchmark Stoxx 600 fell more than one percent from the open as a result.

The worries showed up on commodity markets too, with copper and oil prices falling.

International benchmark Brent crude was down around 1.5% early Wednesday.

Traders said monetary tightening could crimp growth, and thus demand for commodities.

For now, most central bankers still bet that the rise in inflation will prove short lived.

But some investors are taking money out of riskier assets, just in case that’s not right.

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European markets fall sharply, following global stocks lower as inflation fears persist; John Laing jumps after KKR buyout

– U.K. inflation more than doubled in April, the Office for National Statistics said Wednesday, with consumer prices rising by 1.5% after a 0.7% climb in March.

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London — European stocks fell on Wednesday, following a global dip in markets as fears about rising inflation continue to weigh on sentiment.

The pan-European Stoxx 600 slid 1.6% by afternoon deals, with basic resources dropping 3.4% to lead losses as all sectors and major bourses traded firmly in negative territory.

European markets are following dour sentiment elsewhere; U.S. stock futures were lower in early premarket trading on Wednesday ahead of more retail earnings, while stocks in Asia-Pacific slipped on Wednesday, with some markets in the region closed for holidays.

Investors concerned about rising inflation will be keeping a close eye on the Federal Open Market Committee as it publishes the minutes from its April meeting on Wednesday.

Minutes of the meeting could provide more clues on when the central bank could consider tapering bond purchases, a move that is expected to come before it increases interest rates.

U.K. inflation more than doubled in April, the Office for National Statistics said Wednesday. Consumer prices rose by 1.5% after a 0.7% climb in March.

“CPI inflation has finally broken out of the 0.2% to 1.0% year-on-year range that it has been in since the pandemic took hold. However, even with core CPI higher, this doesn’t yet reflect rising underlying domestic inflationary pressure,” said Melanie Baker, senior economist at Royal London Asset Management.

“The U.K. economy is still operating below pre-crisis levels and inflation expectations look reasonably well anchored. However, as the economy reopens, it seems likely that we will see some further price increases and inflation is likely to end the year higher.”

European earnings came from E.On, which also holds an annual general meeting. Deutsche Boerse, Uniper, Experian and Premier Foods will also publish their latest results.

Shares of British infrastructure investment group John Laing jumped more than 11% to a 52-week high after private equity firm KKR announced that it had agreed to buy the company for £2 billion ($2.84 billion).

On the Stoxx 600, Swedish engineering company Sandvik and gambling group Evolution Gaming both fell 5%, while Swiss hearing aid manufacturer Sonova gained 2.8% after JPMorgan and Goldman Sachs upgraded the stock.

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Inflation spooks stocks and raises fear the Fed is wrong that the price spike is temporary

– Markets were braced for a hot consumer inflation report, but nowhere near the 4.2% headline increase reported for April.

– The report raised concerns that the Fed’s view that higher inflation will be transitory is wrong, even though Fed Vice Chairman Richard Clarida reiterated that view after the report.

– Stocks sold off, yields jumped and the futures market signaled that some investors believe the Fed could hike interest rates earlier than expected.

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Red-hot consumer inflation data for April spooked markets and raised concerns that the Fed is wrong about rising prices being just temporary.

If the Fed is incorrect, that means that it could begin to unwind its easy policies quicker than expected and ultimately raise interest rates.

The Consumer Price Index for April rose 4.2% from a year ago, the briskest pace since September 2008. Economists had expected a big number, of 3.6%, because of base effects accounting for last year’s weakness. But the CPI’s surge took markets by surprise, sending Treasury yields higher and stocks lower.