Pubblicato in: Cina

Cina ed Hong Kong. I media occidentali hanno cambiato registro.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2020-05-31.

Aeroporto di Pechino 001

È stato sufficiente un trafiletto di due righe emesso dal Ministro degli Esteri che tutti i media occidentali hanno immediatamente mutato regime, coordinati e ligiamente pronubi con un banco di sardine.

«China will take necessary countermeasures to foreign interference regarding the new Hong Kong security legislation being deliberated»

Non servono tante parole, se chi le pronuncia è una persona seria ed esprime un ambiente altrettanto serio. Non sono una minaccia: sono una certezza.

Ecco due esempi della velocità e consistenza della recezione del messaggio.

Le ‘pro-democracy demonstrations‘ sono adesso denominate:

«anti-government demonstrations»

Le azioni legislative cinesi da liberticide ed antidemocratiche sono ora espresse in questi termini:

«perceived threats to the semi-autonomous city’s freedoms»

* * * * * * *

«Hong Kong police fired pepper pellets to disperse protesters in the heart of the global financial centre on Wednesday and arrested about 240 people as national security legislation proposed by Beijing revived anti-government demonstrations»

«As tensions soared, riot police were deployed around Hong Kong’s Legislative Council, deterring protesters who had planned to gather there as a bill was due to be debated that would criminalise disrespect of the Chinese national anthem»

«Angry over perceived threats to the semi-autonomous city’s freedoms, people of all ages took to the streets, some dressed in black, some wearing office clothes and some hiding their faces beneath open umbrellas in scenes reminiscent of the unrest that shook Hong Kong last year»

«The latest protests in Hong Kong follow the Chinese government’s proposal for national security legislation aimed at tackling secession, subversion and terrorist activities in the city. The planned laws could see Chinese intelligence agencies set up bases in Hong Kong»

«The United States, Australia, Britain, Canada and others have expressed concern about the legislation, widely seen as a possible turning point for China’s freest city and one of the world’s main financial hubs.»

* * * * * * *

Ma se questi governi si arrogano il diritto di fare altezzosamente la morale alla Cina, loro multinazionali razzolano in modo ben diverso.

Cina. Multinazionali aprono in continuazione stabilimenti. – Nestlé.

Daimler, Mercedes Benz, ha ripreso la produzione in Cina.

Exxon Mobil Corp e la Cina. Notizia non economica bensì politica.

E questo solo per fare qualche esempio.

*


China says will act against foreign interference to Hong Kong law.

China will take necessary countermeasures to foreign interference regarding the new Hong Kong security legislation being deliberated, the foreign ministry said on Wednesday.

Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian made the remarks during a daily briefing in response to a question about U.S. President Donald Trump’s comments that Washington is working on a strong response to the legislation that will be announced before the end of the week.

*


Hong Kong police fire pepper pellets to disperse protests over security bill.

Hong Kong police fired pepper pellets to disperse protesters in the heart of the global financial centre on Wednesday and arrested about 240 people as national security legislation proposed by Beijing revived anti-government demonstrations.

As tensions soared, riot police were deployed around Hong Kong’s Legislative Council, deterring protesters who had planned to gather there as a bill was due to be debated that would criminalise disrespect of the Chinese national anthem.

Angry over perceived threats to the semi-autonomous city’s freedoms, people of all ages took to the streets, some dressed in black, some wearing office clothes and some hiding their faces beneath open umbrellas in scenes reminiscent of the unrest that shook Hong Kong last year.

“Although you’re afraid inside your heart, you need to speak out,” said Chang, 29, a clerk and protester dressed in black with a helmet respirator and goggles in her backpack.

Many shops, banks and offices closed early. Police were seen rounding up dozens of people, making them sit on a sidewalk and then searching them.

The latest protests in Hong Kong follow the Chinese government’s proposal for national security legislation aimed at tackling secession, subversion and terrorist activities in the city. The planned laws could see Chinese intelligence agencies set up bases in Hong Kong .

The proposal, unveiled in Beijing last week, triggered the first big street unrest in Hong Kong in months on Sunday, with police firing tear gas and water cannon to disperse protesters.

The United States, Australia, Britain, Canada and others have expressed concern about the legislation, widely seen as a possible turning point for China’s freest city and one of the world’s main financial hubs.

But Chinese authorities and the Beijing-backed government in Hong Kong say there is no threat to the city’s high degree of autonomy and the new security law would be tightly focused.

“It’s for the long-term stability of Hong Kong and China, it won’t affect the freedom of assembly and speech and it won’t affect the city’s status as a financial centre,” Hong Kong Chief Secretary Matthew Cheung told reporters.

“It would provide a stable environment for businesses.”

U.S. President Donald Trump, already at odds with Beijing over trade and the novel coronavirus pandemic, said on Tuesday the United States would this week announce a strong response to the planned legislation.

China responded by saying it would take necessary countermeasures to any foreign interference.

ARRESTS

Protesters in a downtown shopping mall chanted “Liberate Hong Kong! Revolution of our times” and “Hong Kong independence, the only way out”.

One protester was seen with a placard reading “one country, two systems is a lie”, referring to a political system put in place at Britain’s 1997 handover of the city to China, which is meant to guarantee Hong Kong’s freedoms until at least 2047.

“I’m scared … if you don’t come out today, you’ll never be able to come out. This is legislation that directly affects us,” said Ryan Tsang, a hotel manager.

As the protests in the financial district died down, hundreds of people gathered in the working class Mong Kok district on the Kowloon peninsula, where protests flared repeatedly last year.

Police, acting much more quickly than before to nip protests in the bud, said they had arrested about 240 people in three districts, most for illegal assembly.

Hong Kong’s most prominent tycoon, Li Ka-shing, said in a statement security laws were within every nation’s right, but Hong Kong had the “mission-critical task” to maintain trust in “one country, two systems”.

Hong Kong media reported Beijing aimed to expand the scope of the legislation to include organisations as well as individuals.

SHARES SLIDE

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen pledged humanitarian relief for any Hong Kong people fleeing to the self-ruled island while Japan said it was “strongly concerned” about the situation.

The U.S.-China Business Council urged “all leaders to take those steps necessary to de-escalate tensions, promote economic recovery and the rule of law, and preserve the ‘one country, two systems’ principle”.

Asian shares slipped over the rising tension between the United States and China. Hong Kong shares led declines with the Hang Seng .HSI falling 0.46%, though it kept a bit of distance from a two-month low touched on Monday. [MKTS/GLOB]

Protesters and pro-democracy politicians say Hong Kong’s National Anthem Bill, which aims to govern the use and playing of the Chinese anthem, represents another sign of what they see as accelerating interference from Beijing.

The bill carries penalties of up to three years jail and or fines of up to HK$50,000 ($6,450) for insulting the anthem. It also orders that primary and secondary school students in Hong Kong be taught to sing the anthem, “March of the Volunteers”, and learn its history.

The anthem bill is set for a second reading on Wednesday and is expected to become law next month.