Pubblicato in: Economia e Produzione Industriale, Medicina e Biologia

Bangladesh. Coronavirus. L’Industria dell’abbigliamento quasi chiusa.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2020-03-31.

2020-03-28__Bangladesh 000

Il Bangladesh è un paese misero.

«Gross Domestic Product of Bangladesh grew 7.9% in 2018 compared to last year. This rate is 3 -tenths of one percent higher than the figure of 7.6% published in 2017.

The GDP figure in 2018 was $288,424 million, Bangladesh is number 43 in the ranking of GDP of the 196 countries that we publish. The absolute value of GDP in Bangladesh rose $26,347 million with respect to 2017.

The GDP per capita of Bangladesh in 2018 was $1,788, $147 higher than in 2017, it was $1,641. To view the evolution of the GDP per capita, it is interesting to look back a few years and compare these data with those of 2008 when the GDP per capita in Bangladesh was $656.

If we order the countries according to their GDP per capita, Bangladesh is in 150th position, its population has a low level of affluence compare to the 196 countries whose GDP we publish.»

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Nel volgere di venti anni, il Bangladesh ha quintuplicato il proprio pil, ma il pil procapite nel 2018 si era attestato a 1,788 Usd: davvero poco anche tenendo conto del basso costo della vita.

La pandemia da coronavirus potrebbe stroncare questa crescita.

«Bangladesh’s garment industry risks collapse»

«The coronavirus pandemic is taking a heavy toll on Bangladesh, which is the world’s second-largest garment exporter»

«The industry is rapidly losing orders, and millions of jobs are at stake.»

«Bangladesh’s ready-made garments sector accounts for around 80% of the country’s manufacturing income, with at least 4 million workers depending on it»

«The country’s garment sector depends hugely on export orders, which have drastically decreased due to the rise of the novel coronavirus cases around the world, including Europe and the US»

«So far, Bangladesh has lost around $1.5 billion (€1.4 billion), which has impacted some 1.2 million workers,»

«Foreign brands are increasingly delaying and canceling orders»

«Since the increase of COVID-19 cases in Europe and the US, Bangladeshi factories are losing around $100 million (€92 million) per day»

«We are trying not to shut down the factories»

«the factory owners will go bankrupt due to the crisis. It is only a matter of time now»

«They are even canceling orders that have reached their ports or have already been shipped»

«Europe is Bangladesh’s biggest garment export market with almost 60% of total consumption»

«In the 2018-19 fiscal year, the South Asian country exported over $19.6 billion worth of garment products to Europe.»

«Our factories are about to close and we will have no business. Some 4.1 million workers will go hungry if we don’t fulfill our commitment to their welfare»

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La depressione economica indotta dalla pandemia da coronavirus colpisce in modo diretto i paesi coinvolti dal processo epidemico ed in modo indiretto quelli solo lievemente affetti, ma il cui export dipendeva dalla buona salute economica degli altri.

Questo dato dovrebbe indurre una profonda riflessione su quanto sarà difficile la ripresa.

La liberazione dal coronavirus gioverà ben poco a quelle zone, od anche a quelle nazioni, il sistema economico delle quali dipendeva da zone o nazioni ancora sotto epidemia, e quindi economicamente in stallo.

La ripresa sarà in ogni caso lunga, difficile e carica di triboli.

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Coronavirus: Bangladesh’s garment industry risks collapse.

The coronavirus pandemic is taking a heavy toll on Bangladesh, which is the world’s second-largest garment exporter. The industry is rapidly losing orders, and millions of jobs are at stake.

Bangladesh’s ready-made garments sector accounts for around 80% of the country’s manufacturing income, with at least 4 million workers depending on it. Although the number of COVID-19 cases is not too high in the South Asian country, the pandemic poses a great risk to this sector and the livelihood of garment workers.

The country’s garment sector depends hugely on export orders, which have drastically decreased due to the rise of the novel coronavirus cases around the world, including Europe and the US.

So far, Bangladesh has lost around $1.5 billion (€1.4 billion), which has impacted some 1.2 million workers, according to Dr. Rubana Haq, president of Bangladesh’s Garment Exporters and Manufacturers Association (BGMEA).

Foreign brands are increasingly delaying and canceling orders, Haq added.

Since the increase of COVID-19 cases in Europe and the US, Bangladeshi factories are losing around $100 million (€92 million) per day.

Haq told DW that BGMEA is trying to secure workers’ wages. “We are trying not to shut down the factories,” she said, adding that it is hard to do so because of a substantial drop in exports.

“Our orders until June have been canceled,” Siddiqur Rahman, vice president of the Federation of the Bangladesh Chambers of Commerce and Industries (FBCCI), told DW. “The situation is dire,” he added.

Rahman fears that the factory owners will go bankrupt due to the crisis. “It is only a matter of time now. I think all the factories will be closed.”

Calls for support

BGMEA claims that foreign companies are also canceling orders that are already in production or completed.

“Foreign companies talk about human rights and compliance. Then why are they being unfair to us?” Haq said. “They are even canceling orders that have reached their ports or have already been shipped.”

Europe is Bangladesh’s biggest garment export market with almost 60% of total consumption. In the 2018-19 fiscal year, the South Asian country exported over $19.6 billion worth of garment products to Europe.

Haq urged international companies to support Bangladesh’s garment sector during and urged the German government to take necessary measures to help Bangladesh’s garment sector.

“Your stores are closed. Our factories are about to close and we will have no business. Some 4.1 million workers will go hungry if we don’t fulfill our commitment to their welfare,” Haq said in a video message, adding that orders that are already in production should not be canceled.

She said that Bangladesh would need support for at least three months to keep its factories running.