Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Materie Prime, Unione Europea

Romania. È energeticamente autosufficiente ed esporta gas naturale.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2020-03-16.

2020-03-09__romania__001

Romania. Lo speaker Florin Iordache fa il gesto del dito ai gerarchi della EU, in europarlamento.

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Romania. Pil anno su anno +4.4%.

Romania. I gerarchi EU la odiano per motivi di sordida bottega.

Romania seeking energy independence [2014-04-28]

«Romania is said to be sitting on Europe’s second-largest shale gas reserves. It’s turned to controversial hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” in a big way to unlock that gas and guarantee energy independence.»

Romania and Hungary clash over Black Sea gas distribution

«Gas deposits off Romania’s coast worth billions of dollars have drawn the country into an economic row with Hungary. The EU is aiming to reduce its energy dependence on Russia, and Budapest wants to play a key role. …. Over the last few years, massive natural gas deposits have been discovered off Romania’s Black Sea coast. Conservative estimates suggest they hold at least 40 billion cubic meters (142 billion cubic feet) of gas; others say they could hold as much as 200 billion cubic meters — enough to cover Romania’s energy needs for decades and even turn the country into an energy exporter.  …. As is so often the case with major international energy sector projects, BRUA has had its share of controversies. At present, Romania and Hungary are embroiled in a legal dispute over Romania’s offshore gas rights and the volume of projected deliveries to Hungary via the BRUA pipeline.

Romania offshore gas law plays with fire [2018-11-20]

«As a new offshore oil and gas exploration law comes into force in Romania, the EU nation’s promise of becoming a key gas producer in Europe could be threatened. Not that Bucharest seems bothered.

Romania’s untapped oil and gas potential of up to 200 billion cubic meters, or bcm, in the Black Sea has attracted the interest of the world’s oil and gas majors, including US giant ExxonMobil and Austria’s OMV Petrom.

Romania already covers almost all its gas use from its domestic onshore production and could double that over the next two decades when — or perhaps now if — offshore sources are added to supply.

The Eastern European country produces 10.5 bcm of gas a year, mostly onshore, and consumes 11-12 bcm, making it largely independent of Russian gas, something others in the region can only envy. Other EU members are in fact scrambling to define coherent energy strategies that don’t make them too reliant on Russian imports, hence the spike in interest in Romania, as well as US and Norwegian gas.»

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Ricapitoliamo.

Al momento attuale la Romania consuma 11 – 12 bcm, billion cubic meter, di gas naturale, producendone 10.5 bcm: è praticamente autosufficiente.

Detto con parole che non si dovrebbero dire, non è più ricattabile energeticamente da parte dell’Unione Europea.

Può abbastanza facilmente diventare però anche un produttore che esporta.

«Hungary was the first to sign up for Romania’s Black Sea gas after Budapest agreed with US firm ExxonMobil for deliveries starting in 2022, covering half of Hungary’s yearly gas consumption of 10 bcm.»

Così, Romania ed Ungheria non dipenderebbero più dal gas russo, specie da quello che fluisce dal Nord Stream attraverso la Germania, che potrebbe sempre chiudere i rubinetti.

«But Romanian state-owned gas transporter Transgaz must first finish phase two of the BRUA gas pipeline that would enable gas transports from Romania to Hungary to reach 4.4 bcm a year»

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«EU accepts Transgaz’s commitments to facilitate natural gas exports from Romania»

«Transgaz has committed to make available to the market significant firm capacities for natural gas exports from Romania to neighbouring Member States, in particular Hungary and Bulgaria»

«More specifically, Transgaz has committed to make available minimum export capacities of 1.75 billion cubic metres per year at the interconnection point between Romania and Hungary (Csanádpalota)»

«This capacity is equivalent to around one sixth of Hungary’s annual gas consumption»

«It has also committed to make available minimum export capacities totalling 3.7 billion cubic metres per year at two interconnection points between Romania and Bulgaria (Giurgiu/Ruse and Negru Vodă I/Kardam). This capacity covers more than half of Bulgaria and Greece’s annual gas consumption.»

Conclusione.

– La Romania è diventata non solo energeticamente indipendente, ma anche grande esportatrice di gas naturale ai paesi limitrofi: Ungheria, Bulgaria e Grecia.

– Se la Commissione ha dovuto avallare questo dato di fatto, i liberal socialisti dell’europarlamento hanno dovuto ingoiare un boccone amaro, rancido: la Romania e gli altri stati sono sempre meno ricattabili economicamente.

– Questa è un’altra grande vittoria degli identitari sovranisti.

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EU accepts Transgaz’s commitments to facilitate natural gas exports from Romania.

Transgaz has committed to make available to the market significant firm capacities for natural gas exports from Romania to neighbouring Member States, in particular Hungary and Bulgaria, the European Commission said.

“Transgaz has committed to make available capacities at interconnection points for increased natural gas exports from Romania to Hungary and Bulgaria,” Commission Executive Vice-President in Charge of Competition Policy Margrethe Vestager said, adding that this will promote the free flow of gas at competitive prices in South Eastern Europe and is a further step towards a single European energy market. “Consumers across the region will benefit from greater security of supply of a key transition fuel towards the ultimate objective of an emissions free energy mix, in line with the European Green Deal,” she added.

The Commission announced a formal investigation in June 2017 to assess whether Transgaz, the state-controlled natural gas transmission system operator in Romania, infringed EU antitrust rules by restricting exports of natural gas from Romania. In particular, the Commission was concerned that Transgaz may have carried out such restrictions by underinvesting in or delaying construction of infrastructure for gas exports and interconnection tariffs for gas exports that made exports commercially unviable, using unfounded technical arguments as a pretext for restricting exports.

These restrictions may have maintained or created barriers to the cross-border flow of natural gas from Romania, one of the EU’s largest natural gas producers, to Hungary and Bulgaria, contrary to the objective of an integrated Energy Union where energy flows freely across borders directed by competitive forces and based on the best possible use of resources, the Commission said.

Following the opening of the formal investigation, Transgaz offered commitments to address the Commission’s concerns. The Commission then consulted market participants to verify whether the proposed commitments would remove the competition concerns identified by the Commission.

In light of the market test, Transgaz has made some amendments to its proposed commitments, the Commission said, adding that the final commitments will ensure that market participants can access significant volumes of export capacities via the interconnection points between Romania and neighbouring Member States. More specifically, Transgaz has committed to make available minimum export capacities of 1.75 billion cubic metres per year at the interconnection point between Romania and Hungary (Csanádpalota). This capacity is equivalent to around one sixth of Hungary’s annual gas consumption. It has also committed to make available minimum export capacities totalling 3.7 billion cubic metres per year at two interconnection points between Romania and Bulgaria (Giurgiu/Ruse and Negru Vodă I/Kardam). This capacity covers more than half of Bulgaria and Greece’s annual gas consumption.

Moreover, Transgaz also committed to ensure that its tariff proposals to the Romanian national energy regulator (ANRE) will not discriminate between export and domestic tariffs in order to avoid interconnection tariffs that would make exports commercially unviable.

Finally, the Romanian company committed to refrain from using any other means of hindering exports.

The final commitments provide for significant additional capacity compared to the market-tested commitments, in particular to Hungary, by including capacities envisaged for the Romanian section of the first phase of the Bulgaria-Romania-Hungary-Austria (BRUA) gas pipeline project, the Commission said, stressing that, as a result, Transgaz’s participation in this project will also be subject to legally binding deadlines.

According to the Commission, the commitments will remain in force until 31 December 2026. A trustee will be in charge of monitoring the implementation and compliance with the commitments.

The Commission said the amended commitments address the identified competition concerns and therefore has made them legally binding on Transgaz.

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