Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo

Bloomberg. La devoluzione, agonia travagliata della socialdemocrazia.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-12-01.

Gigante dai Piedi di Argilla

«Mane, Thecel, Phares»


Adesso che Mr Bloomberg ha annunciato l’intenzione di correre per la White House, sta diventando di grande interesse cercare di comprendere quale sia il suo pensiero politico strategico.

Un ripensamento sulla socialdemocrazia è mandatorio per inquadrare sia l’azione prospettata ai liberal democratici, sia tutti gli eventuali futuri rapporti con l’Unione Europea.

«What happened? And is their decline terminal?»

* * * * * * *

«Born out of the second industrial revolution, the movement is stumped by the fourth»

«Here’s the state of Social Democrats across continental Europe: In two corners, Scandinavia and Iberia, they’re alive and well, having become pragmatic centrists or, as in Denmark, having turned hard right on issues such as migration. Almost everywhere in between — from France to the Netherlands, Germany, Austria and Italy — they’re in various states of disarray or dissolution»

«What happened? And is their decline terminal?»

«That’s what Germany’s SPD, founded 156 years ago as the ancestor of the movement, should be asking itself, as it convenes next week to anoint new leaders and decide whether to quit its coalition with the conservative bloc of Chancellor Angela Merkel»

«But this more existential question won’t be debated, at least not honestly»

«It shows the percentage of eligible voters in the Federal Republic of Germany who plumped for the SPD in national elections. What you see is a rise in the postwar years, when the SPD formally dropped its Marxist doctrines to appeal to potentially all Germans, not just the blue-collar types»

«The SPD then peaked in the 1970s under two Social Democratic chancellors, Willy Brandt and Helmut Schmidt, who promised to lift more people into prosperity.»

«But in the 1980s and 90s, the ideological left wing of the party fought back. Lifting up was de-emphasized. Leveling down was the new message, as the SPD cast aspersions on “the rich.” Its support dwindled. The lifters briefly prevailed again over the levelers in 1998, putting the third Social Democrat in the chancellery, Gerhard Schroeder. But since then the levelers have dominated rhetorically. According to polls, the next bar in this chart will be the smallest yet»

«Something similar has taken place around the neighborhood. The equivalent party in France, called PS, had an absolute majority of the National Assembly in 2012, then got overrun by the brand-new centrist movement of President Emmanuel Macron; it is now irrelevant»

«Its Italian sister, called PD, is in government again, but as a much diminished junior partner to populists. Emulating Macron, Matteo Renzi, the PD’s former star, will quit and form his own party»

«One lesson is that Social Democrats, not unlike the Democrats in the U.S., do well whenever they promise opportunity and badly whenever they preach, as Winston Churchill put it, ‘he gospel of envy”»

«But envy is all they ‘ve got these days.»

«But that’s what the SPD keeps trying. It has just spent months haggling with its coalition partners to top up the state pensions of low-income retirees who’ve paid into the system for 35 years or more»

«Not discussed was the unsustainability of the whole pension system, in which ever fewer young people will pay ever more of their income to ever more old people»

«As usual, the SPD is baffled that it hasn’t risen in the polls»

«The bigger insight is that the Social Democrats are simply out of ideas and out of date.»

«proletariat is disappearing»

«Brains are more important than brawn»

* * * * * * *

Prendiamo atto del pensiero espresso da Bloomberg.

Verosimilmente per la necessità di esporre in modo sintetico l’enorme problematica della devoluzione socialista è stata tratteggiata per sommi capi, peraltro intuibili facilmente.

A nostro sommesso parere, il quadro delineato è incompleto per un deficit del bagaglio culturale.

Tutto il fenomeno è visto nella sua mera dimensione economica, sicuramente di grande importanza, ma non unico e più importante elemento.

Non esiste la ‘economia‘: esiste l’essere umano che agisce liberamente anche nel settore economico, e che può anche pensare ed agire in contrasto alla valutazione del rapporto beneficio / costi.

Ma se proprio si volesse restringere il campo alla sola economica, se è vero che è quasi scomparso il proletariato nella sua classica accezzione, sarebbe altrettanto vero constatare che in occidente circa il venti percento della popolazione viva nella fascia dell’indigenza e della miseria. Questa è la testimonianza vivente del fallimento della socialdemocrazia anche nel settore economico.

Ma il più vistoso fallimento è quello legato all’aver voluto rimpiazzare i retaggi religiosi, storici, culturali e sociali dei popoli con l’ideologia socialista. Anche se non praticante, larga quota della popolazione nutre sentimenti religiosi e si indentifica nelle le sue radici . Il fatto che i socialdemocratici siano sostanzialmente atei non implica minimamente che le masse lo siano, e quindi non li votano.

Grande e fatale errore è stato il voler caratterizzare la socialdemocrazia con un innaturale snaturamento dei principi etici e morali: di qui una incombente crisi demografica, il disgregamento della famiglia e dei suoi valori, il tentativo di inoculazione di sentimenti pervertiti in animi che non li accettano e che quindi non li condividono. Ci sarebbe ben altro da dire, ma non è questo tempo e luogo.

Il politicamente corretto è stata poi la ciliegina sulla torta.

*

In estrema sintesi, condividiamo pienamente l’ultimo statement:

«The bigger insight is that the Social Democrats

are simply out of ideas and out of date.»

Notiamo infine da ultimo, ma non certo per ultima cosa, come ad un’analisi condivisibile se non altro nella sua conclusione, manchi del tutto la parte propositiva, ossia come ricostruire sulle macerie socialdemocratiche.

*


Bloomberg. 2019-11-29. Europe’s Social Democrats Could Suffer Mass Extinction

Born out of the second industrial revolution, the movement is stumped by the fourth.

Here’s the state of Social Democrats across continental Europe: In two corners, Scandinavia and Iberia, they’re alive and well, having become pragmatic centrists or, as in Denmark, having turned hard right on issues such as migration. Almost everywhere in between — from France to the Netherlands, Germany, Austria and Italy — they’re in various states of disarray or dissolution. What happened? And is their decline terminal?

That’s what Germany’s SPD, founded 156 years ago as the ancestor of the movement, should be asking itself, as it convenes next week to anoint new leaders and decide whether to quit its coalition with the conservative bloc of Chancellor Angela Merkel. But this more existential question won’t be debated, at least not honestly

To get the big picture, look at the chart below. It shows the percentage of eligible voters in the Federal Republic of Germany who plumped for the SPD in national elections. What you see is a rise in the postwar years, when the SPD formally dropped its Marxist doctrines to appeal to potentially all Germans, not just the blue-collar types. The SPD then peaked in the 1970s under two Social Democratic chancellors, Willy Brandt and Helmut Schmidt, who promised to lift more people into prosperity.

But in the 1980s and 90s, the ideological left wing of the party fought back. Lifting up was de-emphasized. Leveling down was the new message, as the SPD cast aspersions on “the rich.” Its support dwindled. The lifters briefly prevailed again over the levelers in 1998, putting the third Social Democrat in the chancellery, Gerhard Schroeder. But since then the levelers have dominated rhetorically. According to polls, the next bar in this chart will be the smallest yet.

Something similar has taken place around the neighborhood. The equivalent party in France, called PS, had an absolute majority of the National Assembly in 2012, then got overrun by the brand-new centrist movement of President Emmanuel Macron; it is now irrelevant. Its Italian sister, called PD, is in government again, but as a much diminished junior partner to populists. Emulating Macron, Matteo Renzi, the PD’s former star, will quit and form his own party.

One lesson is that Social Democrats, not unlike the Democrats in the U.S., do well whenever they promise opportunity and badly whenever they preach, as Winston Churchill put it, ‘he gospel of envy. But envy is all they ‘ve got these days. Hence calls by Germany’s SPD (and others) to bring back a wealth tax, even though it was suspended in the 1990s because it was a nightmare to assess and brought in little revenue.

Another lesson: You can’t just keep looking for new demographic groups that allegedly suffer some urgent “injustice” that must be fixed (by Social Democrats, of course). But that’s what the SPD keeps trying. It has just spent months haggling with its coalition partners to top up the state pensions of low-income retirees who’ve paid into the system for 35 years or more. Why not 34 years? Nobody knows. Not discussed was the unsustainability of the whole pension system, in which ever fewer young people will pay ever more of their income to ever more old people. As usual, the SPD is baffled that it hasn’t risen in the polls.

The bigger insight is that the Social Democrats are simply out of ideas and out of date. They sprang from the second industrial revolution, when workers eked out miserable and unsafe existences in factories, smelting ores or bashing metals. Just by fighting for the right to safe workplaces and paid leave, Social Democrats did lift many people up. But today, at the dawn of the fourth industrial revolution, that proletariat is disappearing. Unions are shrinking. Jobs are moving into the service sector and the gig economy. Brains are more important than brawn.

Un pensiero riguardo “Bloomberg. La devoluzione, agonia travagliata della socialdemocrazia.

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