Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Spagna. Socialisti perdono seggi e Vox duplica i consensi. Cdx in vantaggio.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-11-10.

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Gli exit polls indicherebbero l’Ipsoe al 27.3%, il PP al 20.1% con Vox ben oltre il 15%, che duplicherebbe il numero dei deputati.

«In the worst case scenario, the right – the People’s party, Vox and Citizens – would win 157 seats of the 350 in parliament, and in the best case 166.

The left – the PSOE, Podemos and its breakaway party Más País – would have 147 seats in the worst case, and 156 in the best.

At that point, speculation would begin of possible alliances with the regional and separatist Basque Nationalist party, Canaries Coalition and the Catalan nationalists.»

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Spain: Socialists take lead in general election, exit polls show

Exit polls put the Socialists ahead in Spain’s general election, but falling short of a majority for the second time this year. Tensions over Catalonia dominated campaigns, prompting a surge in support for the far-right.

Spain’s ruling socialist PSOE party took an early lead in Sunday’s general election but will come up short of a majority, exit polls showed shortly after polling stations closed.

An exit poll conducted by public television RTVE showed the PSOE securing 27.3% of the vote, followed by the conservative People’s Party (PP) with 20.1%.

The far-right Vox party was on track to take third place, more than doubling its seats in parliament since the last general election in April, RTVE reported.

Some 37 million people were eligible to cast their votes in the latest election, although official figures showed voter turnout was low. Just over 56% of voters had cast their ballots by 6:00 p.m. (1700 GMT), according to the Interior Ministry — down from the 60.7% recorded at the same time during the vote in April.

Catalonia in focus

Much of the campaigns in the run-up to Sunday’s vote focused on the heightened tensions over the independence movement in the northeastern region of Catalonia.

Recent protests in Catalonia, some of which saw violent unrest, led to a boost in support for the far-right, with Vox vowing to take a tough stance against secessionists. The far-right party also supports harsher regulations against immigration.

Shortly after casting his ballot in Madrid, Vox party leader Santiago Abascal said he hoped “the election serves to reinforce Spanish unity.”

Political stalemate

The last general election in April also saw the Socialists win the most votes, but fall short of a majority. Attempts by acting Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez to secure support from other parties to form a government subsequently failed, prompting him to call an election.

Opinion polls ahead of Sunday’s vote indicated that the results would not be enough to break Spain’s political stalemate.