Pubblicato in: Demografia, Devoluzione socialismo

Germania. Aumenta il numero dei miseri, in gran parte femmine single.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-10-11.

Femminista e spazzatura

A quarant’anni era una femminista in tiro.


Il numero dei pensionati tedeschi che dovrebbe vivere con 905 euro al mese sta crescendo di giorno in giorno e si avvia a diventare il 21.6% della popolazione.

In questa categoria ricadono i lavoratori non qualificati ed i single, per lo più femmine.

Nemesi si beffa di questa società femminista: sai che bel sugo passare giovinezza e maturità facendo ciò che aggrada e poi subire decenni di miseria.

Respireranno, forse, aria pulita, ma sfamarsi con 905 euro al mese è impresa improba.

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«Financial problems in old-age are a worry for the majority of Germans.»

«A study by the Ernst & Young consulting company published at the start of 2019, found more than half of all Germans have a fear of living in poverty later in life.»

«A total of 56 percent of respondents said they were very or slightly scared of financial insecurity in old age, an 18 percent jump from 2017.»

«More than every fifth pensioner in Germany will face financial insecurity in the next 20 years, according to a new study»

«The proportion of pensioners at risk of poverty could rise from 16.8 to 21.6 percent»

«Groups particularly affected are low-skilled workers, single people – especially women – and people who’ve experienced long periods of unemployment»

«Schiller called for reform of the pensions system»

«Eastern German pensioners will have to cope with a particularly severe increase. The number of pensioners dependent on the state in eastern regions is currently a fairly low 6.5 percent …. But it could almost double to just under 12 percent by 2039»

«Precarious employment, part-time work, fixed-term contracts and breaks in working life for mothers can lead to financial struggles later in life»

«The current research uses data from 2018 that shows there are 31 people aged 67 and over in every 100 people of working age – and this could rise to 47 after the baby boomers enter retirement in 2038»

«Someone in Germany is generally deemed to be living in poverty if they live in a household with an income below 60 per cent of the current median (or typical) household income, although other factors are taken into account. According to the study, these are people whose monthly net income is less than €905»

* * * * * * *

Il problema tedesco è riassunto molto bene da due articoli usciti di recente.

«All this begs the question – who will pay for us all when we’re older if there aren’t enough people to contribute to the social security system?»

«As a care crisis looms, Health Minister Jens Spahn thinks people without children should contribute more to the German social security system»

«In the pay-as-you-go system, the elderly receive money from young people – even if they are the children of others»

«Currently, there is no difference in the amount of pension tax (Rentenversicherung) that people pay, but there’s a clause which means people without kids already pay slightly more to the Pflegeversicherung»

* * *

How Germany plans to fight its drastic shortage of care workers

«Around 1.6 million people work in the care sector in Germany. But almost 40,000 jobs are unfilled — and demand is growing due to an ageing population. What happens now?

Better pay, lighter workloads and more trainees: that’s how the government hopes to plug a huge vacancy gap in Germany’s crisis-hit care sector.

There are almost 40,000 unfilled nursing care positions throughout the country. The issue is particularly urgent because the number of people who need care in Germany is expected to rise significantly in the coming decades: from the 3.3 million counted in 2017, to four million by 2030, and 5.3 million by 2050, according to estimates by authorities.

Why? Because German society is getting older and that means there’s going to be a bigger burden on care services, which are already struggling to cope. At the other end of the scale, people are having less babies, although family friendly policies, like paid parental leave, do seem to be having a positive impact on the birth rate.»

*

Should people without children be forced to pay more tax in Germany?

«As a care crisis looms, Health Minister Jens Spahn thinks people without children should contribute more to the German social security system. We spoke to an expert to find out why and what it all means.

We’ve all been there: the first time you open your payslip in Germany can come as quite a shock. Why? Well, because a big chunk of your wages is taken away in the form of tax and social security contributions.

This is, of course, a good thing in many ways because it should (hopefully) mean that we live in a country with good public services and that we’ll be provided with excellent health care when we need it, a pension in future and long term nursing care.

But there are problems ahead.

German society is getting older and that means there’s going to be a bigger burden on care services, which are already struggling to cope. At the other end of the scale, people are having less babies, although family friendly policies, like paid parental leave, do seem to be having a positive impact on the birth rate.

All this begs the question – who will pay for us all when we’re older if there aren’t enough people to contribute to the social security system?

Spahn, a politician who is vying to replace Angela Merkel as head of the centre-right Christian Democrats (CDU) when she steps down in December, last week tried to tackle this issue, which resulted in a bit of a frenzy across German media.

In an editorial piece for the daily Südwest Presse newspaper, All this begs the question – who will pay for us all when we’re older if there aren’t enough people to contribute to the social security system?

In an editorial piece for the daily Südwest Presse newspaper, Spahn said people who don’t have children should pay more towards care and pension insurance than parents do. He also said the current system was unsustainable. 

Spahn said that 3.3 million people currently receive long-term care insurance (Pflegeversicherung) benefits, 1.7 million people already live with dementia and 300,000 more are diagnosed every year, adding that the task to deal with it all is “growing”.

“In the pay-as-you-go system, the elderly receive money from young people – even if they are the children of others,” Spahn said.

Currently, there is no difference in the amount of pension tax (Rentenversicherung) that people pay, but there’s a clause which means people without kids already pay slightly more to the Pflegeversicherung.

Those without children between the ages of 23 and 64 contribute 0.25 percentage points more towards long -term care insurance than parents do.»

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Benissimo.

Adesso i quarantenni se la ridano pure di cuore. Tra venticinque anni non rideranno più. Saranno trattati per come hanno trattato.


The Local. 2019-09-12. Old-age poverty in Germany ‘set to rise significantly’

More than every fifth pensioner in Germany will face financial insecurity in the next 20 years, according to a new study.

The proportion of pensioners at risk of poverty could rise from 16.8 to 21.6 percent by 2039, according to research published on Thursday by the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin) on behalf of the Bertelsmann Stiftung. 

That’s the case even if the economy remains in good shape, researchers say. Groups particularly affected are low-skilled workers, single people – especially women – and people who’ve experienced long periods of unemployment. 

Christof Schiller, head of the study, said: “Even if the labour market develops positively, we must expect a significant increase in poverty among the elderly in the next 20 years.”

Schiller called for reform of the pensions system.

Someone in Germany is generally deemed to be living in poverty if they live in a household with an income below 60 per cent of the current median (or typical) household income, although other factors are taken into account. According to the study, these are people whose monthly net income is less than €905.

The proportion of pensioners who are dependent on the state to secure their livelihood could rise from the current nine percent to just under 12 percent by 2039. 

The DIW study found eastern German pensioners will have to cope with a particularly severe increase. The number of pensioners dependent on the state in eastern regions is currently a fairly low 6.5 percent –  probably as a result of higher female employment during the GDR era. But it could almost double to just under 12 percent by 2039.

What are the reasons for old-age poverty?

Precarious employment, part-time work, fixed-term contracts and breaks in working life for mothers can lead to financial struggles later in life. 

The pension system is also under pressure as the population gets older. The current research uses data from 2018 that shows there are 31 people aged 67 and over in every 100 people of working age – and this could rise to 47 after the baby boomers enter retirement in 2038.

The study lays bare the problems that lie ahead. Social security and how to deal with an ageing population are high on the agenda of Germany’s ruling coalition, made up of the centre-right Christian Democrats (CDU/CSU) and the centre-left Social Democrats (SPD).

Earlier this year, Labour Minister Hubertus Heil, of the SPD, presented his plan on introducing a basic pension (Grundrente) in Germany. It would see people who have clocked up 35 years of work, raised children or cared for relatives receive a supplement to their pension. It is intended to help those who receive a small pension.

But the Union is opposed to the basic pension being paid if the person concerned is not in need – for example, if that person has a partner with a good income who can support them. However, Heil insists on the model without means testing to avoid bureaucracy.

According to the study authors, the coalition plans, even without means testing, would not be “sufficiently targeted” to help those in need.

If implemented, the plans would limit the poverty risk rate to 18.4 percent by 2039, but many people would still fall through the net.

Schiller suggested adding a simple income test to Heil’s plans, which would ensure that only low-income households are taken into account, but would keep the administrative burden low.

He also said there should be more flexibility, which could help pensioners whose working lives have been interrupted by longer breaks in employment.

The report is primarily based on data from a representative survey of the German resident population (SOEP) conducted annually since 1984.

Financial problems in old-age are a worry for the majority of Germans.

A study by the Ernst & Young consulting company published at the start of 2019, found more than half of all Germans have a fear of living in poverty later in life.

A total of 56 percent of respondents said they were very or slightly scared of financial insecurity in old age, an 18 percent jump from 2017.