Pubblicato in: Demografia, Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Germania. Alle elementari non si studia più il tedesco.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-08-27.

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L’allarme è dato dal Deutsche Welle, testata giornalistica governativa, gestita in gran parte da membri della SpD.

«Students come from 42 different nations, including Turkey, Bulgaria, Syria, Greece and Nigeria»

«In grade one, more than 80% of the kids are the children of migrants, and many of them start their primary education with little to no German-language skills»

«The issue has also divided language pedagogues. Some support more rigorous language prerequisites and testing before a child can start elementary school. Others have highlighted the importance of integrating children in German schools as soon as possible in order to boost language abilities»

«Many of the children here have only ever been exposed to their native language»

«each first-year class of around 20 children is appointed two teachers and one assistant. Among the instructors are Polish, Arabic and Turkish-speakers, and some of them know firsthand what it’s like to go to school while learning German as a second language»

* * * * * * *

Nessuno si stupisca di codeste frasi: sono la pura e semplice realtà dei fatti.

Germania. Già ora è realtà geografica non di un popolo.

«Gemäß einer Studie der Gesellschaft für deutsche Sprache ist 2018 der häufigste Name für ein Neugeborener in Berlin Mohammed gewesen. Dies gilt in allen möglichen Schreibvarianten, wie die Gesellschaft mitteilte.»

I recenti dati forniti da Destatis, l’Istituto di statistica tedesco, sono cimiteriali.

«Gli ultra sessantacinquenni sono 17.281 milioni, dei quali 15.289 (88.47%) milioni autoctoni e 1.990 (11.53%) milioni non di etnia tedesca. Per il naturale rinnovo, entro quindici anni circa mancheranno all’appello 15.289 milioni di tedeschi autoctoni.

Considerando invece i giovani in età compresa tra 0 e 15 anni, questa classe di età ammonta a 10.836 milioni di persone. Gli autoctoni sono 6.539 (60.3%) milioni mentre 4.297 (39.7%) sono non tedeschi.

Le femmine straniere sono infatti solo il 24.5% della popolazione femminile, ma figliano il doppio di quelle tedesche: ossia il 39.6%.»

Questa situazione porta solo ed unicamente ad una conclusione:

Germania. Destatis. Crollo persone in età lavorativa dai 51.8m ai 40m nel 2035.

«Alla diminuzione della numerosità della popolazione al lavoro conseguirà una diminuzione dei contributi pensionistici versati, da cui ancora un inasprimento del problema di come fare a pagare le pensioni in essere, visto che esse sono pagate con i contributi versati.»


Germany: 20.8 million people with immigrant background

«Only 15% of 20.8 million people with an immigrant background came as asylum-seekers.»

* * *

Il problema della denatalità delle femmine autoctone tocca, eccome!, i tedeschi autoctoni quarantenni: se non riprendessero a fare figli non potrebbero andare in pensione. Ognuno fa le sue scelte e ne è il diretto responsabile.

Poi, a cose fatte, ci penserà la Sharia.

P.S. Tra quindici anni ci saranno ancora tedeschi madrelingua per insegnare il tedesco nelle scuole?

* * * * * * *

Questi dati non sono ignoti né a Mr Putin, né a Mr Trump né a Mr Xi: ed essi ne stanno traendo le conseguenze.


Visiting a Berlin elementary school where German isn’t always spoken

«Kids in Germany are trickling back to school as a debate heats up about holding back those with poor German. DW’s Kate Brady visited a Berlin classroom to see the struggles and successes of German-language learners.

It’s the first week back at school at Christian Morgenstern elementary school in Berlin’s western district of Spandau. A colorful garland hangs from the ceiling of class 1A: “Congratulations on starting school!”

Below it, some 20 wide-eyed first-year students listen to their teacher. Some of the 6-year-olds are raptly attentive; others seem more interested in their new pencil cases proudly showcased on their desks. Freshly made name tags sit in front of each child: Mehmet, Shakira, Ameena, Roy. Absent are the traditionally German-sounding Florians, Stefans and Anjas.

The school itself is named after German poet and translator Christian Morgenstern. It teaches some 570 children, aged six to 12, across six grades. Students come from 42 different nations, including Turkey, Bulgaria, Syria, Greece and Nigeria. In grade one, more than 80% of the kids are the children of migrants, and many of them start their primary education with little to no German-language skills.

Call for better German proficiency

For Christian Morgenstern, the start of the school year has coincided with a national debate about whether those 6-year-olds who lack German-language proficiency should be held back from starting grade one.

The debate was spurred by remarks that Carsten Linnemann, a high-ranking member of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservative Christian Democrats (CDU), made to the German regional newspaper Rheinische Post in early August. The politician called for tougher matriculation language requirements, saying, “A child who barely speaks and understands German has no place yet in an elementary school,” and should instead receive additional preschool instruction. 

Linnemann’s comments prompted a backlash from German media, as well as from fellow members of the conservative CDU. But a poll published on Wednesday by Insa polling institute showed that not all Germans are on the same page.

The poll, which surveyed 2,060 citizens, found that 50.2% agreed with Linnemann’s statement while 32.1% disagreed. When respondents were sorted for political affiliation, some 60.1% of CDU supporters backed Linnemann. The highest amount of support came from fans of the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, with 85.9%. 

The issue has also divided language pedagogues. Some support more rigorous language prerequisites and testing before a child can start elementary school. Others have highlighted the importance of integrating children in German schools as soon as possible in order to boost language abilities.

‘No blanket measures’

Christian Morgenstern head teacher and principal Karina Jehniche says she’s a strong advocate of preparing children better before they start school, but is against blanket measures.

“Like in any school, the development of each child is different. Many of the children here have only ever been exposed to their native language,” Jehniche said. ….

At Christian Morgenstern, each first-year class of around 20 children is appointed two teachers and one assistant. Among the instructors are Polish, Arabic and Turkish-speakers, and some of them know firsthand what it’s like to go to school while learning German as a second language.»

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