Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Senza categoria, Stati Uniti, Trump

Cnn. Trump si avvia ad essere rieletto.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-05-14.

Minosse & Macron

«The US economy is booming.»

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«The economy added 263,000 jobs in the month of April, and the unemployment rate is now just 3.6% — the lowest it’s been since 1969! On top of the better-than-expected GDP news last month, it’s now quite clear that President Donald Trump is overseeing an economy going gangbusters»

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«Which brings me to a radical idea I have been kicking around for a while now: Trump’s best chance at winning would be to cease issuing statements — or tweets — about anything other than the economy. And to cut ALL statements and tweets down to, roughly, one a day.»

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«No Mueller report. No name-calling of potential Democratic candidates. No nothing — other than tweeting or speaking about the current state of the economy. And doing that once a day.»

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«But such an extreme approach to his public pronouncements would also give Trump the best chance to bridge the current chasm between people who think he is doing a good job on the economy (a majority of the public) and people who approve of the job he is doing overall»

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«A less divisive — and less abnormal — Republican president, with this same economic record through two-plus years of his term, would be sitting pretty for reelection.»

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«Yes, more people still disapprove of the job Trump is doing (50%) than approve of it. And, yes, again, Trump has come close to 46% approval before — he got to 45% in June 2018 and in January 2017. And, yes, for a third time, there is no meaningful statistical difference between 45% approval and 46% approval.»

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«Likely a series of good economic numbers — led by 3.2% GDP growth in the first quarter of 2019. (Worth noting: The Gallup poll was out of the field by April 30, meaning that the gangbusters April jobs report isn’t even factored into Trump’s numbers.)»

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«It’s among Democrats where Trump’s job approval has improved the most month-to-month; just 4% approved of the job he was doing in March compared to 10% who said the same in April. Independents went from 33% job approval for Trump in March to 39% in April.»

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«The more the strong economy is front and center, the better for Trump.»

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È una Cnn sconsolata che parla affranta con il cuore in mano.

Più l’economia tira e più Mr Trump aumenta le probabilità di essere rieletto l’anno prossimo.

Alla gente comune interessa avere un lavoro dignitoso, con cui mantenere sé stessi e la propria famiglia. Interessa avere uno stipendio in crescita, avendo con ciò un maggior potere di acquisto.

Delle sottili diatribe e di tutte le altre discussioni che stanno riempiendo la pagine dei giornali ben poco se ne cale.

E questo è un punto sul quale i liberal democratici hanno ben poco potere di intervento. Possono sicuramente impostare leggi che blocchino oppure ostacolino il processo economico, possono sicuramente far fuoco di sbarramento usando le corti distrettuali, ma alla fine la gente guarda a quanto entra ed a quanto deve uscire dal proprio portafoglio.

Far lavorare e guadagnare la gente è la migliore propaganda elettorale che sia possibile.

Ma se Mr Trump dovesse essere rieletto, ebbene, allora i liberal democratici sarebbero davvero finiti.

Me Trump finirebbe di bonificare le corti distrettuali e quelle federali, immettendovi giudici quarantenni, che occuperebbero il loro posto per altri quaranta anni.


CNN. 2019-05-07. Donald Trump is more popular than ever before

Donald Trump is the only president in modern history to never crack 50% job approval in Gallup’s weekly tracking poll of how Americans perceive the job that the president is doing. 

But in the latest Gallup numbers, Trump is at 46% approval — the highest mark he has reached in more than two years as President.

Yes, more people still disapprove of the job Trump is doing (50%) than approve of it. And, yes, again, Trump has come close to 46% approval before — he got to 45% in June 2018 and in January 2017. And, yes, for a third time, there is no meaningful statistical difference between 45% approval and 46% approval.

But, still! This is Donald Trump we are talking about. A man who has struggled for much of his presidency to even win the approval of 40% of Americans for the job he is doing. Just look at Trump’s week-by-week performance in Gallup. Not good!

What explains Trump’s upward trajectory? Likely a series of good economic numbers — led by 3.2% GDP growth in the first quarter of 2019. (Worth noting: The Gallup poll was out of the field by April 30, meaning that the gangbusters April jobs report isn’t even factored into Trump’s numbers.)

Dig into the numbers and you see something very interesting. Trump’s gains of late are not, as you might expect, from Republicans. Nine in 10 Republicans backed Trump in March, the same number who did so in April. It’s among Democrats where Trump’s job approval has improved the most month-to-month; just 4% approved of the job he was doing in March compared to 10% who said the same in April. Independents went from 33% job approval for Trump in March to 39% in April.

Obviously, Trump’s gains of late come even as special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his report into Russian interference in the 2016 election and the entire 448-page behemoth, with some redactions, has been released to the public. The report’s finding — no provable criminal conspiracy with the Russians by anyone within the Trump campaign, no recommendation on whether to charge Trump with obstruction of justice — remain a vigorously debated subject but don’t seem to have adversely affected how people perceive Trump to be doing his job.

All of which seems to prove the point White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney made last week: “People will vote for somebody they don’t like if they think it’s good for them.”

The Point: The more the strong economy is front and center, the better for Trump. Now, all he needs to do is get out of his own way — which is easier said than done.

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CNN. 2019-05-07. A radical proposal to get Donald Trump reelected in 2020

The news on Friday confirmed — beyond a shadow of a doubt — this fact: The US economy is booming.

The economy added 263,000 jobs in the month of April, and the unemployment rate is now just 3.6% — the lowest it’s been since 1969! On top of the better-than-expected GDP news last month, it’s now quite clear that President Donald Trump is overseeing an economy going gangbusters.

And yet, for all of the successes of the economy — and the fact that a majority of Americans (56%) give him credit for his handling of the nation’s finances — Trump’s job approval ratings remain mired in the low 40s, a dangerous place to be for a sitting president ramping up a reelection bid.

Which brings me to a radical idea I have been kicking around for a while now: Trump’s best chance at winning would be to cease issuing statements — or tweets — about anything other than the economy. And to cut ALL statements and tweets down to, roughly, one a day.

No Mueller report. No name-calling of potential Democratic candidates. No nothing — other than tweeting or speaking about the current state of the economy. And doing that once a day.

Yes, such a strategy might prompt accusations that Trump is hiding from the media. Or that he is walking away from things such as building the border wall that his base quite clearly values.  

But such an extreme approach to his public pronouncements would also give Trump the best chance to bridge the current chasm between people who think he is doing a good job on the economy (a majority of the public) and people who approve of the job he is doing overall (43% in the latest CNN-SSRS poll).

That gap seems, quite clearly, the result of the fact that people simply do not like Trump and his overall approach — bragging, bullying etc. — to the job. What better way to make people focus on the part of the Trump presidency they do like (the economy) than by downplaying the part they don’t like (Trump personally)?

To be clear: This will NEVER happen. Trump is not capable of the sort of discipline it would require. And, even if he were, other issues would likely crop up that, as president, he and his advisers would feel compelled to address.

But, I propose it to make this point: Trump’s biggest hurdle to a second term is his personality and behavior in office.

The Point: A less divisive — and less abnormal — Republican president, with this same economic record through two-plus years of his term, would be sitting pretty for reelection. Trump, because he is Trump, isn’t.

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