Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Fisco e Tasse, Unione Europea

Macron progetta una megariduzione delle tasse e della spesa pubblica.

 Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2019-04-10.

Il titolo del The Wall Street Journal è eloquente:

French Press for Tax Cuts as Macron Pressured to Deliver Change

Simile il titolo di Bloomberg.

France Wants Tax Cuts: That’s the Message From Macron Town Halls

«- Taxes must ‘fall and fall fast,’ Edouard Philippe says

‘- Great Debate’ also calls for proportional representation

The French want to pay less tax.

That was the clear message that emerged from a two-month “Great Debate” that saw voters present their grievances and suggest remedies to President Emmanuel Macron.

“There’s an exasperation about taxes,” Prime Minister Edouard Philippe said in Paris April 8, as he was presented with a study outlining the findings of the national debate. “The clear message is that taxes must fall and fall fast.”»

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Ecco il titolo di Reuters.

Macron’s Great Debate shows need to cut taxes faster, says French PM

«French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe said that after three months of public debate it was that clear tax cuts must be speeded up to quell the widespread anger over high living costs that has fueled anti-government protests. ….

“The debate clearly shows us in which direction we need to go: we need to lower taxes and lower them faster,”  ….

The French have understood … that we cannot lower taxes if we don’t lower public spending»

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Più chiari di così non si potrebbe essere.

«taxes must fall and fall fast»

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Il nostro buon Lenin lo aveva detto in una chiarissima, estrema sintesi: “la borghesia la ammazzi con le tasse”.

Non aveva previsto che anche i borghesi possono scendere in piazza e fare un putifarre.

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«cutting taxes must be a priority, in response to a national debate that focused on the yellow vest protesters’ grievances.»

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«the debate clearly shows us in which direction we need to go: we need to lower taxes and lower them faster»

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«France has the highest taxation rate among developed countries»

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«Data from the OECD economic think-tank for 2017 shows France top, with taxes equivalent to 46.2% of national output (GDP), with Denmark second (46%) and Sweden third (44%).»

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«spending was 31.2% of GDP in France in 2018; in second place was Belgium (28.9%) and third was Finland (28.7%). The UK figure was 20.6%.»

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«Tax cuts have been a key demand of the yellow vest (“gilets jaunes”) movement»

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«Mr Philippe said the three-month national debate had highlighted “immense frustration over taxes”.»

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«Yellow vest protesters accuse Mr Macron of protecting the Parisian elite, especially the wealthy, while neglecting the hardship of citizens in the provinces.»

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In Germania sono in corso manifestazioni di piazza contro il caro-affitti: il popolo sta finalmente alzando la testa.

Ci si domanda se per avere un taglio delle tasse anche in Italia i Patrioti non debbano scendere in piazza a manifestare tutta la loro rabbia violenta.

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The Local. 2019-04-09. Great debate: France ‘must implement bold tax cuts’ declares prime minister

The French government must implement bold tax cuts, the prime minister said on Monday, after a mass public consultation called in the wake of “yellow vest” protests that shook President Emmanuel Macron.

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Giving the first conclusions of a “Great National Debate” which was launched in January in response to the protests, Prime Minister Edouard Philippe said French citizens had expressed “an enormous exasperation” over the heavy tax burden.

“The debates show us very clearly which way to go. We need to lower taxes, and lower them more quickly,” he told an audience in Paris.

The “yellow vest” protests, so called for the fluorescent vests worn by demonstrators, began in mid-November initially over fuel taxes before morphing into a nation-wide revolt against Macron.

The 41-year-old centrist came to power in May 2017 promising pro-business reforms and he has focused his tax cuts so far on companies and high-earners in a bid to increase investment and lower unemployment.

The president is expected to announce new policies in a major speech planned in the middle of the month.

The “Great National Debate” involved 10,000 meetings in community halls around the country, around two million online contributions and saw Macron join local events for nearly 100 hours in total.

As well as lower taxes, Philippe said that several other themes which had emerged during the consultation, which was designed to draw the anger out of the “yellow vest” protest movement.

Citizens wanted a more direct say in the running of the country – so-called “participatory democracy” – and action to combat climate change.

“We have reached a point where hesitating would be worse than an error, it would be an offence,” Philippe added. “The need for change is so radical that any conservatism, any feebleness would be unforgiveable in my view.”

France has the highest taxation rate in the developed world, according to the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.

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Bbc. 2019-04-09. France plans tax cuts to quell yellow vest anger

The French prime minister says cutting taxes must be a priority, in response to a national debate that focused on the yellow vest protesters’ grievances.

Edouard Philippe said “the debate clearly shows us in which direction we need to go: we need to lower taxes and lower them faster”.

The “great debate” involved 10,000 meetings in French community halls and about two million online contributions.

France has the highest taxation rate among developed countries.

Data from the OECD economic think-tank for 2017 shows France top, with taxes equivalent to 46.2% of national output (GDP), with Denmark second (46%) and Sweden third (44%).

But France also has the highest level of social spending, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

That spending was 31.2% of GDP in France in 2018; in second place was Belgium (28.9%) and third was Finland (28.7%). The UK figure was 20.6%.

Town-country divide

Tax cuts have been a key demand of the yellow vest (“gilets jaunes”) movement that has taken to the streets in France every weekend since mid-November.

Initially the protesters demanded lower fuel taxes, but the movement quickly morphed into a general rejection of President Emmanuel Macron’s economic policies.

Mr Philippe said the three-month national debate had highlighted “immense frustration over taxes”.

One of Mr Macron’s least popular measures, early in his presidency, was to scrap a special tax for the wealthy.

Yellow vest protesters accuse Mr Macron of protecting the Parisian elite, especially the wealthy, while neglecting the hardship of citizens in the provinces.

Mr Philippe said another lesson from the debate was that “the balance must be restored between the cities and the regions”. That would include improving transport links between urban and rural areas.

There was also public demand for more participatory democracy and more action to tackle climate change, he said.

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