Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Visegrad. La politica familiare inizia a dare i suoi frutti.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-11-08.

2018-11-03__Ungheria__001

Nella Repubblica Ceka nel 1999 vi erano 1.13 nascite per donna, salite a 1.57 nel 2016.

In Ungheria nel 1999 vi erano 1.28 nascite per donna, salite a 1.45 nel 2016.

In Polonia nel 2010 vi erano 1.25 nascite per donna, salite a 1.32 nel 2016. Si tenga presente che in Polonia molti dei giovani adulti sono emigrati all’estero.

Nel 2016 il tasso di fertilità era 1.40 in Croazia, 1.53 in Bulgaria, 1.58 in Romania. In Italia era invece un disperante 1.35.

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Uno dei più vistosi effetti della Weltanschauung liberal socialista è la dissoluzione dell’istituto familiare, un generalizzato controllo delle nascite ed un ampio ricorso all’aborto per controllare quella che il liberal designano come ‘sovrapopolazione‘ e ‘libertà‘ della femmina. Strano concetto di libertà quello che la intende come possibilità legale si assassinare il proprio figlio e per di più con decisione solitaria, senza aver bisogno del parere del partner.

Nulla di cui stupirsi se alla fine le nazioni a governo liberal stiano andando incontro all’estinzione per denatalità, con tutti i problemi che ne derivano.

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«The Fidesz-KDNP government has chosen to support couples with children rather than accept mass migration to ameliorate long-term demographic issues, to the chagrin of its critics in the European Union’s power elite»

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«In recent years, finding the proper response to Europe’s demographic decline has become one of the biggest sources of disagreement between European and Hungarian politics»

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«While Brussels bureaucrats and the European liberal, pro-migration mainstream see immigration as the necessary and unavoidable solution, the Hungarian government stands committed to the idea of increasing birth rate through more effective family support measures»

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«existing pro-family policies implemented by the Orbán government are already bearing fruit, with abortion number dropping by more than a third from 40,449 to 28,500 from 2010 to 2017, divorces falling from 23,873 in 2010 to 18,600, and — perhaps most remarkably — marriages increasing by a striking 42 percent»

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«The country’s new constitution makes a commitment to protect the unborn, but abortion on demand up to 12 weeks remains legal, and up to 24 weeks in the case of severe disability»

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«The European Union often attempts to interfere with family policy in Hungary»

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Is Hungary Experiencing a Policy-Induced Baby Boom?

In 2015, the government of Hungary announced a major new policy: families would be given generous subsidies to buy or build new homes, and the subsidies would scale up based on their marital status and the number of children they had. This “Family Housing Allowance Program,” or CSOK (the abbreviation of the program’s Hungarian name), gives a maximum benefit to married couples with three or more children, equivalent to a $36,000 grant to buy a new home, alongside a major value-added tax deduction for each home, and a capped-interest loan for part of the home value. These interest and tax benefits are probably worth around another $15,000 to $50,000 per family, depending on the house they buy and their likely loan terms. In other words, for a married couple buying a new house with at least three kids, the value of their total payout could run anywhere from $50,000 to $80,000. Meanwhile, for a couple with just two kids, the payout could be from around $18,000 to $35,000.

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Gli effetti sono visibili, come riportato nel grafico.

Ripetiamo però come il problema non si estingua nel mero aspetto economico, importante sicuramente, ma non essenziale.

Si richiede un cambio mutazionale di mentalità. Se prima le femmine percepivano la prole come un peso, adesso la si dovrebbe vedere come un beneficio. Se prima si inculcava alle femmine il concetto di donna in carriera che si realizzava nel lavoro, adesso ritorna il concetto normale di realizzazione nella famiglia e nell’allevamento della prole.

È un processo che richiederà almeno una generazione.


Marriage Up, Abortion and Divorce Down as Hungary Chooses Family Support Over Mass Migration

Hungary is preparing to hold a country-wide national consultation on its family policy, which has already resulted in an increase in marriage and a decline in abortion and divorce.

The Fidesz-KDNP government has chosen to support couples with children rather than accept mass migration to ameliorate long-term demographic issues, to the chagrin of its critics in the European Union’s power elite.

“In recent years, finding the proper response to Europe’s demographic decline has become one of the biggest sources of disagreement between European and Hungarian politics,” observed Dr Zoltán Kovács, official spokesman for Prime Minister Viktor Orbán’s Cabinet Office, in a post on the official About Hungary website announcing the upcoming national consultation.

“While Brussels bureaucrats and the European liberal, pro-migration mainstream see immigration as the necessary and unavoidable solution, the Hungarian government stands committed to the idea of increasing birth rate through more effective family support measures,” the Hungarian added.

Dr Kovács claimed existing pro-family policies implemented by the Orbán government are already bearing fruit, with abortion number dropping by more than a third from 40,449 to 28,500 from 2010 to 2017, divorces falling from 23,873 in 2010 to 18,600, and — perhaps most remarkably — marriages increasing by a striking 42 percent.

Hungary’s results in reducing abortion, in particular, have earned widespread praise from pro-life organisations overseas.

The country’s new constitution makes a commitment to protect the unborn, but abortion on demand up to 12 weeks remains legal, and up to 24 weeks in the case of severe disability, according to the Christian Institute.

It appears to be extra government support for adoption services and counselling for expectant mothers which has brought the number of abortions down, along with a requirement for a three-day waiting period between an abortion request and termination, to make sure women have time to reflect on their decision and cannot easily be rushed by third parties.

The European Union often attempts to interfere with family policy in Hungary, with the bloc’s unelected governing executive weighing to denounce a pro-adoption poster campaign showing an unborn baby in its mother’s womb with the slogan ‘I understand that you are not yet ready for me, but give me up to the adoption agency, LET ME LIVE!’ as being “against European values”.

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