Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Unione Europea e Visegrad. Scontro (quasi) finale. La Lituania.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-03-21.

 Unione Europea 049

Quanti non avessero ben presente le modalità di voto in seno al Consiglio Europeo, potrebbero trovarne qui una sintesi:

Consiglio Europeo. Votazioni. Maggioranza qualificata e beghe varie.

«I membri del Consiglio europeo sono i capi di Stato o di governo dei 28 Stati membri dell’UE, il presidente del Consiglio europeo e il presidente della Commissione europea.

Il Consiglio europeo definisce le priorità e gli orientamenti politici generali dell’UE

Nella maggior parte dei casi, il Consiglio europeo decide per consenso. Tuttavia, in alcuni casi specifici previsti dai trattati UE, adotta decisioni all’unanimità o a maggioranza qualificata.

Alla votazione non partecipano né il presidente del Consiglio europeo né il presidente della Commissione.»

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«Quando il Consiglio vota una proposta della Commissione o dell’alto rappresentante dell’Unione per gli affari esteri e la politica di sicurezza, si raggiunge la maggioranza qualificata soltanto se sono soddisfatte due condizioni:

– il 55% degli Stati membri vota a favore – in pratica ciò equivale a 16 paesi su 28

– gli Stati membri che appoggiano la proposta rappresentano almeno il 65% della popolazione totale dell’UE

Questa procedura è nota anche come regola della “doppia maggioranza”.»

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«- L’applicazione dell’art 7 contro la Polonia dovrebbe legalmente essere deliberata con unanimità, vertendo essa sulla ”constatazione di una grave e persistente violazione da parte di uno Stato membro dei valori contemplati nell’art. 2 TUE, ai sensi dell’art. 7 del medesimo trattato“. Procedura controversa.

– Taluni stati asseriscono che la decisione possa essere presa a maggioranza qualificata. Procedura anche essa controversa.»

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Il problema.

«In December, the European Commission, the executive arm of the 28-nation European Union of which Poland is part, took the unprecedented step of triggering Article 7 of the EU Treaty against the country, stepping up pressure on Warsaw over controversial changes to the judicial system by the country’s ruling conservatives»

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«The European Commission on December 20 gave Warsaw three months to respond to its recommendations on the rule of law. Tuesday marked the end of the EU executive’s deadline»

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«The legal changes in Poland “are not intended to limit the independence of judges, but to maintain independence and to improve efficiency,”»

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«The European Commission’s December Article 7 move means that the EU executive wants the bloc’s member states to declare the rule of law in Poland is under threat»

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«penalties on Warsaw would have to be backed unanimously by EU member states, an improbable scenario after some member states, including Hungary, have said they would not support sanctions »

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«The Hungarian parliament has adopted a resolution to support Poland over a dispute with the European Commission caused by controversial judicial changes»

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«Skvernelis said he believed that Poland would find a compromise with Brussels that would make it possible to avoid sanctions. “However, if this doesn’t happen … our parliament, government and president will be guided by the fact that Poland is our strategic partner,” he said»

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«We will certainly support Poland»

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Di questi giorni, sempre che non si vada ad un ulteriore rimando, vedremo quanto Mr Juncker e Frau Merkel saranno politicamente in grado di portare a compimento le minacce e l’aut aut inviato alla Polonia.

Se non fossero in grado di portare a termine la radiazione della Polonia dall’Unione Europea Mr Juncker e Frau Merkel farebbero la figura dei peracottai ed i paesi del Visegrad ne uscirebbero a testa alta.

In ogni caso questa questione, posta e gestita come da dilettanti allo sbaraglio, esiterà in una profonda incrinatura dell’attuale Unione Europea.

Si legga correttamente: non dell’Unione Europea in sé, bensì di questa attuale dirigenza, che tra l’altro è quasi arrivata a fine mandato.


Radio Poland. 2018-03-20. EU ministers set to discuss rule of law in Poland.

EU ministers for European affairs meeting on Tuesday were set to discuss the rule of law in Poland in yet another debate in Brussels following disputed legal changes carried out by the government in Warsaw.

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In December, the European Commission, the executive arm of the 28-nation European Union of which Poland is part, took the unprecedented step of triggering Article 7 of the EU Treaty against the country, stepping up pressure on Warsaw over controversial changes to the judicial system by the country’s ruling conservatives.

The European Commission on December 20 gave Warsaw three months to respond to its recommendations on the rule of law. Tuesday marked the end of the EU executive’s deadline.

The Polish government spokeswoman, Joanna Kopcińska, was quoted by public broadcaster Polish Radio’s IAR news agency on Tuesday as saying that “the response will be forwarded.”

During Tuesday’s debate, Frans Timmermans, Vice President of the European Commission, was expected to brief the meeting on ongoing talks with Poland. He was also expected to offer an evaluation of a “white paper” that the government in Warsaw has drawn up to explain its reasons for the contested judiciary changes.

During a debate in the European Parliament in late February, Timmermans voiced hope that the European Commission and the Polish government would hammer out an agreement by the end of March.

Poland’s Foreign Minister Jacek Czaputowicz said ahead of Tuesday’s meeting that the government’s arguments defending its judicial overhaul were “slowly coming home” to officials in Brussels. The legal changes in Poland “are not intended to limit the independence of judges, but to maintain independence and to improve efficiency,” Czaputowicz said on Monday.

The European Commission’s December Article 7 move means that the EU executive wants the bloc’s member states to declare the rule of law in Poland is under threat.

Such a step could pave the way for sanctions being imposed on Poland, for example suspending its voting rights in the European Union. But penalties on Warsaw would have to be backed unanimously by EU member states, an improbable scenario after some member states, including Hungary, have said they would not support sanctions.

In late February, the Hungarian parliament adopted a resolution to support Poland in its dispute with the European Commission over the judicial changes.

Meanwhile, the prime minister of Lithuania, Saulius Skvernelis, said earlier this month that his country, a fellow member of the European Union, would support Poland in the row.

Skvernelis added that his country could play the role of a mediator between the European Commission and the government in Warsaw.

Poland’s governing Law and Justice (PiS) party has said sweeping legal changes are needed to reform an inefficient and sometimes corrupt judicial system tainted by the communist past, accusing judges of being a self-serving clique often out of touch with the problems of ordinary citizens.

But opponents have accused Law and Justice of aiming to stack courts with its own candidates and to dismantle the rule of law.


Radio Poland. 2018-03-20. Polish PM in Vilnius hails Lithuania as strategic partner

Lithuania is a “strategic partner” for Poland amid many historical, geographical and defence ties between the two neighbouring nations, Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said on Friday.

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He was speaking in the Lithuanian capital Vilnius after meeting his counterpart Saulius Skvernelis.

“We support Lithuania in protecting its skies, and we also try to develop joint energy projects, very specific ones that lead to the synchronisation of power systems and those that will increase our trade in terms of gas transport,” Morawiecki said.

Meanwhile, Lithuania’s Skvernelis described Poland as a “particularly important partner for Lithuania” and said he hoped Morawiecki’s visit would help “further step up bilateral relations.”

Skvernelis referred to shared Polish-Lithuanian historical experience and close business cooperation.

He also said that Poland was the third-largest business partner for his country and the second-largest export market for Lithuanian companies.

The two prime ministers watched as officials from both countries signed agreements including one to launch a ferry connection between the northwestern Polish port of Szczecin and Lithuania’s Klaipeda.

While in Vilnius on Friday, Poland’s prime minister was also scheduled to talk with his counterparts from the two other Baltic states, Latvia and Estonia.

Vilnius ready to mediate between Brussels and Warsaw: Lithuanian PM

In an interview with public broadcaster Polish Radio, Lithuania’s Skvernelis has said that his country, a fellow member of the European Union, could play the role of a mediator between the EU’s executive arm, the European Commission in Brussels, and the government in Warsaw in a dispute over legal changes in Poland.

At the end of last year, the European Commission took the unprecedented step of triggering Article 7 of the EU Treaty against Poland, stepping up pressure on Warsaw over controversial changes to the judicial system by the country’s ruling conservatives.

While the move could ultimately result in sanctions against Poland, these would require unanimity among all other EU member states.

Skvernelis said he believed that Poland would find a compromise with Brussels that would make it possible to avoid sanctions. “However, if this doesn’t happen … our parliament, government and president will be guided by the fact that Poland is our strategic partner,” he said.

“We will certainly support Poland,” he declared.

In late February, the Hungarian parliament adopted a resolution to support Poland over a dispute with the European Commission caused by controversial judicial changes.


Radio Poland. 2018-03-20. Hungarian parliament backs Poland against EU sanctions

The Hungarian parliament has adopted a resolution to support Poland over a dispute with the European Commission caused by controversial judicial changes.

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At the end of last year, the European Commission took the unprecedented step of triggering Article 7 of the EU Treaty against Poland, stepping up pressure on Warsaw over controversial changes to the judicial system by the country’s ruling conservatives.

The Hungarian government has been consistent in stating that it would oppose sanctions against Poland, with Hungarian Deputy Prime Minister Zsolt Semjen having previously vowed that his country would defend Poland against “unjust” and “political” measures by the EU.

The resolution adopted by the country’s parliament read: “We are calling on the Hungarian government to support Poland, to prevent the rights guaranteed to Poland under EU Articles from being diminished, and to oppose proposals which would restrict the fundamental rights Poland enjoys as an EU member”.

“We Hungarians, similarly to the Poles … joined the EU of our own free will. We did this with trust that we were joining a community based on values such as law, justice and freedom.”

Hungarian parliamentarians also called on Hungarian members of the European Parliament to likewise oppose any EU measures against Poland.

The resolution gained 114 votes in favour, and 13 against.

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