Pubblicato in: Criminalità Organizzata

Ngo (ong) chiedono maggiori fondi all’Unione Europea

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2018-01-22.

 Parassiti Afidi

Le ngo (ong) si trovano in crescenti difficoltà ad operare in molti stati europei.

La European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) ha recentemente rilasciato un Report (riportato in calce), su codesto argomento.

Queste sono le ragioni che adducono.

«The centre-right European People’s Party has been pushing to restrict EU funds for NGOs.»

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«The lack of sustainable long-term financing hampers the effectiveness of the civil groups’ work. Most funds are only available through short-term projects that do not cover advocacy and awareness-raising.»

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«The agency recommends setting up funds for long-term financing and that the administrative burdens should be proportionate and reasonable. The free movement of capital – something that has come under threat in Hungary and the UK – is also key in providing funding.»

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«Another issue highlighted by the report is that governments across the EU are not keen to consult with civil organisations when working on new legislation. Even if governments are open for consultation, they give very little time – in extreme cases only a few hours – for organisations to comment on bills.»

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«Counterterrorism, anti-moneylaundering measures, shrinking budgets and threats curtail the work of civil rights’ groups in the EU, a new report published on Thursday (18 January) by the EU’s Vienna-based Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) has found. »

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«While there is a clear effort to crackdown on NGOs in Hungary and Poland, experts say that rights groups face threats across the bloc.»

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«In a number of countries counterterrorism measures had a direct or indirect effect on NGOs. Freedom of assembly for instance was reduced in countries such as France and Spain.»

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«Anti-moneylaundering measures also had an impact: in the UK over 300 UK-based charities’ bank accounts were frozen at least temporarily because of strict implementation of the new rules»

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«Civil society groups under attack in Hungary and Poland urged the EU on Tuesday (9 January) to set up a fund geared towards NGOs that are protecting European values in member states»

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«The European Commission in December referred Hungary to the EU’s top court because of the law, which the bloc’s executive said infringed EU rules»

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«She said that the police, the interior ministry and other law enforcement organisations have ceased their contracts with the NGO»

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«She said NGOs used to rely on public financing, but with the government of the Law and Justice Party (PiS) in power those funds have dried up»

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Il cuore del problema risiede nella prima frase enucleata.

«The centre-right European People’s Party has been pushing to restrict EU funds for NGOs.»

La Commissione elargisce sponte sua grandi quantità di fondi alle ngo, notabilmente quelle facenti capo a Mr Soros. Poi vi sono i fondi incanalati tramite la European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights. Poi tutto il resto.

Quindi enuncia come sia insito nei principi fondamentali dell’Unione Europea l’accettazione delle ngo sul territorio nazionale degli stati membri.

Indi queste ngo agiscono facendo attiva propaganda contro i governi legittimamente eletti, qualora essi fossero dissenzienti dalla linea della dirigenza europea. La piazza deve aver ragione sulle libere elezioni.

Tutto questo è dagli eurocrati denominato “democrazia”

«She said foreign funding has been the key in maintaining the independence of her organisation»

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«Hungary …. which the bloc’s executive said infringed EU rules »

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Ricapitoliamo.

Se le ngo mantengono la loro indipendenza dagli stati dove operano perché ricevono finanziamenti dall’estrero, allora dipenderanno dai voleri dei finanziatori esteri.

A quanto sembra i Trattati EU conterrebbero la norma in accordo alla quale gli stati membri debbano accogliere e lasciare operare le ngo. Si sarebbe davvero molto curiosi che ci fosse indicato dove si trovi scritto un simile assunto.


EuObserver. 2018-01-14. Hungarian and Polish NGOs urge EU funds against crackdown

Civil society groups under attack in Hungary and Poland urged the EU on Tuesday (9 January) to set up a fund geared towards NGOs that are protecting European values in member states.

NGOs in the two central European countries, where what Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orban once boasted was ‘illiberal democracy’ has taken a hold, have called for the creation of a so-called “European Values Instrument” that would support civil society groups that are promoting democracy, human rights and rule of law.

“We should be putting our money where our mouth is,” Marta Pardavi, co-chair of the Hungarian Helsinki Committee, which has recently been the target of a government campaign against NGOs, said at a European Parliament hearing.

She said foreign funding has been the key in maintaining the independence of her organisation.

The Helsinki Committee partly focuses on protecting the rights of asylum seekers and refugees, which has made the NGO a target for Orban’s government, which vehemently opposes taking in refugees.

“European institutions should set up a instrument to defend civil rights organisations,” Pardavi said, adding that there were such mechanisms for accession and third countries, but not for EU member states.

Pardavi told EUobserver that existing EU funds are designed for specific, short-term projects, usually available for 18 months. She argued that for the sustainable functioning and reinforcement of human rights NGOs, an overarching funding should be available.

“The later this fund comes to life, the more money it would need,” she argued.

The Hungarian Helsinki Committee is one of the organisations affected by new legislation targeting civil society groups that receive foreign – including European – funding, forcing them to label themselves as “supported from abroad”.

The European Commission in December referred Hungary to the EU’s top court because of the law, which the bloc’s executive said infringed EU rules.

Pardavi said her organisation would not comply with the new law.

She said that the police, the interior ministry and other law enforcement organisations have ceased their contracts with the NGO, despite having worked together for over 20 years.

“There is desperate need for the EU to start recognising the problem of the civil society organisations,” Malgorzata Szuleka, lawyer and researcher at the Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights in Poland said at the event, adding that NGOs are usually the first victims in countries where rule of law is under pressure.

She said the shrinking space for NGOs to consult with the government is one of the ways Poland is shutting out the civil society from telling their opinion on draft laws.

Szuleka told Euobserver that certain NGOs are on a “starvation diet” in Poland, especially those dealing with migrants and refugees, and women’s rights.

She said NGOs used to rely on public financing, but with the government of the Law and Justice Party (PiS) in power those funds have dried up. She cited the example of EU funds for migration and refugees that has not been distributed in Poland by the authorities.

Szuleka said the EU should step in and help make NGOs more resistant to the changing of the governments.

‘Ill democracies’

At the parliament hearing, human rights advocates argued that governments in Poland, Hungary and, for a period of time, in Croatia, are working from a similar “playbook”, when building an illiberal democracy, undermining fundamental rights and the rule of law.

Hungary has been regularly criticised by the European Commission, whic has also launched the Article 7 sanctions procedure against Poland on rule of law issues.

“We see a number of countries, where there are worrying developments on the rule of law, democracy, and fundamental rights. And the EU is struggling to cope with that,” said liberal MEP Sophie in ‘t Veld, one of the organisers of the event, along with EPP MEP Frank Engel.

In ‘T Veld added that this is not about a divide between the eastern and western part of the EU, but among people who stand up for the rule of law and those authoritarians who take away human rights.

 


EuObserver. 2018-01-18. Rights NGOs face fresh threats across the EU, agency says

Civil rights group – particularly LGBT groups – face threats in the EU.

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Counterterrorism, anti-moneylaundering measures, shrinking budgets and threats curtail the work of civil rights’ groups in the EU, a new report published on Thursday (18 January) by the EU’s Vienna-based Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) has found.

Civil society as a whole – a key pillar of democracy – is under threat in many parts of the EU, it concludes.

“A thriving democracy needs a healthy civil society. Unfortunately, the EU’s own civil society is facing a pattern of threats and pressures in many parts of the EU,” FRA director Michael O’Flaherty said, adding that addressing this “unacceptable situation should be a high priority” for the EU and member states.

The FRA focuses on human rights and makes recommendations to both the EU and member states to protect human rights when implementing EU law.

While there is a clear effort to crackdown on NGOs in Hungary and Poland, experts say that rights groups face threats across the bloc.

In a number of countries counterterrorism measures had a direct or indirect effect on NGOs. Freedom of assembly for instance was reduced in countries such as France and Spain.

Anti-moneylaundering measures also had an impact: in the UK over 300 UK-based charities’ bank accounts were frozen at least temporarily because of strict implementation of the new rules.

The agency wants EU member states to make sure that new measures do not have negative side-effects on NGOs.

Attacks, physical abuse, threats and smear campaigns against NGOs have become the new norm, researchers say. “They feel it’s part of their job now,” an official familiar with the issue said.

The attacks typically come from political groups, for instance from people unhappy with groups helping refugees. LGBTI rights, womens’ rights and the rights of refugees tend to be the most sensitive subjects, receiving the brunt of threats.

However, it is difficult to assess the scope of the threat, because there are no figures on this as authorities do not register if a physical abuse was a direct attack against a civil group. The agency plans a report specifically on that in the autumn.

In some cases, civil groups fear state surveillance, the report notes. In July 2015, Amnesty International reported that “UK government agencies had spied on the organisation by intercepting, accessing and storing its communications”.

Short on money

The lack of sustainable long-term financing hampers the effectiveness of the civil groups’ work. Most funds are only available through short-term projects that do not cover advocacy and awareness-raising.

Shrinking national budgets and increasing administrative burdens also complicate the NGOs’ work.

The agency recommends setting up funds for long-term financing and that the administrative burdens should be proportionate and reasonable. The free movement of capital – something that has come under threat in Hungary and the UK – is also key in providing funding.

Recently, several NGOs have called for the establishment of a specific EU fund for rights groups. The European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) also urged such a move last autumn.

Another issue highlighted by the report is that governments across the EU are not keen to consult with civil organisations when working on new legislation. Even if governments are open for consultation, they give very little time – in extreme cases only a few hours – for organisations to comment on bills.

The report was compiled after NGOs said they are coming under increasing political pressure by changing laws and some have endured physical attacks.

While the EU is often visible at helping civil society outside of the bloc, there have been few measures to protect or even to assess the situation of civil groups within the EU.

The Civil Liberties Union for Europe (Liberties), an NGO promoting the civil liberties in the EU, said in a statement that with the FRA’s report it could be harder for “politicians in Brussels to ignore” the increasing threat to NGOs.

The organisation notes that the EU commission and European Parliament have been “largely uninterested in pleas” from activists to protect rights groups.

The centre-right European People’s Party has been pushing to restrict EU funds for NGOs.

 

 

 

 

 

European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights. 2018-01-18. Civil society under threat, Fundamental Rights Agency finds.

In many parts of the EU, civil society is under threat, finds a new report by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA). Given the vital role civil society plays in upholding democratic processes and in promoting human rights, decision makers need to ensure the important work of civil society is not undermined through policy and legal changes and funding cuts.

“A thriving democracy needs a healthy civil society. Unfortunately, the EU’s own civil society is facing a pattern of threats and pressures in many parts of the EU. Addressing this unacceptable situation should be a high priority for policy makers at EU and national levels,” says FRA Director Michael O’Flaherty.

The ‘Challenges facing civil society organisations working on human rights in the EU’ report explores how these challenges vary across the EU. It points to:

– Threats, physical and verbal attacks against activists, as well as smear campaigns;

– Legal changes that negatively affect civil society, such as freedom of assembly restrictions, often a by-product of counter-terrorism laws;

– Shrinking budgets and increased difficulties in getting funding;

– Lack of appropriate involvement of civil society in law- and policy-making.

Member States should abide by the laws, including international standards that recommend civil society participation in policy cycles. Due attention must also be paid to ensure that new or redrafted laws and policies do not undermine the work of civil society. Civil society funding also needs to be protected. In addition, channels of dialogue between civil society and the EU need to be strengthened to ensure their concerns are heard and addressed. This includes finding ways to collect comparable and reliable data on the challenges civil society face, such as threats, intimidation and attacks.

This report contains promising practices that are being used to address these challenges.

Notes to editors:

– FRA is the EU’s independent body for delivering fundamental rights assistance and expertise to the EU and its Member States.

– As part of its cooperation with non-governmental organisations and civil society, FRA initiated this research to look into how best to enable and protect civil society. 

– The report will be launched at an event in Brussels at the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) on 19 January which will also be livestreamed. 

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Un pensiero riguardo “Ngo (ong) chiedono maggiori fondi all’Unione Europea

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