Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Giustizia, Unione Europea

Polonia. La Camera bassa approva la riforma della giustizia.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2017-12-10.

Polonia. Varsavia. Corte di Giustizia. 001

«Lower house passes bill making changes to Supreme Court»

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«The bills’ approval comes a day after the ruling Law & Justice party named Western-educated banker Mateusz Morawiecki to become prime minister»

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«Poland took a major step toward overhauling its courts, a move the European Union says undermines the country’s democratic order and one that overshadows a leadership change aimed at rebooting relations with Brussels»

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«The lower house approved legislation on Friday to revamp the Supreme Court by forcing two fifths of the court’s justices into retirement and overhaul a panel that appoints judges»

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«Leaders including French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel have suggested that Poland may face economic penalties for the erosion of democracy»

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La Polonia ha subito nel secolo scorso la dittatura prima dei tedeschi di Hitler, quindi dei russi di Stalin e successori fino al collasso del comunismo.

Adesso sta lottando contro la dittatura dell’Unione Europea, che la ha già portata in giudizio davanti alla Alta Corte di Strasburgo, e che vuole imporle la propria Weltanschauung, che chiamano confidenzialmente “democrazia“.

Se i polacchi si sono espressi in modo inequivocabile alle urne conferendo la maggioranza al partito Legge e Giustizia, tra l’altro in quelle elezioni non risultò essere eletto nemmeno un deputato della sinistra, risentono ancora della pregressa dittatura che aveva nominato giudici costituzionali dei liberal di provata fede.

Più che organo giuridico, la Corte Costituzionale polacca è diventata lo strumento politico tramite il quale opera la dirigenza liberal e socialista europea: forma uno stato nello stato e persegue interessi stranieri. Un gruppo di fuoco per il killeraggio degli avversari politici dei liberal.

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Non a caso:

«The cumulative effect of the reforms “puts at serious risk the independence of all parts of the Polish judiciary,” the Venice Commission, a democracy watchdog for the Council of Europe human rights group».

La Commissione di Venezia, dal nome della città in cui si riunisce, è un organo consultivo del Consiglio d’Europa che ufficialmente porta il nome di “Commissione europea per la Democrazia attraverso il Diritto“.

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Ovunque siano andati al potere, liberal e socialisti hanno nominato giudici di strettissima osservanza, colonizzando in questa maniera le corti di giustizia, che hanno quindi utilizzato il proprio ruolo e mansione per condizionare la politica: più che corti di giustizia sarebbe più appropriato denominarle succursale della disciolta Ovra. La politicizzazione liberal e socialista dei giudici costituzionali polacchi grida vendetta a Dio ed agli uomini. Sono polacchi rinnegati.

Bene.

Lo scontro è in atto.

Una sola considerazione.

Frau Merkel, sempre poi che rimanga cancelliera, farebbe bene a guardare il comportamento della magistratura tedesca, che applica la “giustizia” con la buonafede di Robespierre.


Bloomberg. 2017-12-08. Polish Lawmakers Approve Bill to Overhaul Justice System

– Lower house Passes bill making changes to Supreme Court

– Legislative push follows change at the top of government

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Poland took a major step toward overhauling its courts, a move the European Union says undermines the country’s democratic order and one that overshadows a leadership change aimed at rebooting relations with Brussels.

The lower house approved legislation on Friday to revamp the Supreme Court by forcing two fifths of the court’s justices into retirement and overhaul a panel that appoints judges. The votes, which send the bills to the Senate, followed a heated parliamentary debate during which opposition lawmakers chanted “dictatorship, dictatorship” and compared the measures to actions taken by Nazis in the 1930s to cement their grip on power.

The draft laws bring closer to conclusion a months-long battle by the governing Law & Justice party to take control over a system that it says is run by a “self-serving clique of judges.” At the same time, the legislative push — a do-over after an earlier attempt triggered national protests and a presidential veto — ignores warnings from the EU that it may impose sanctions on member states who fail to uphold its values.

The bills’ approval comes a day after the ruling Law & Justice party named Western-educated banker Mateusz Morawiecki to become prime minister. Morawiecki, a finance minister and veteran of international meetings in New York and London, was chosen to sell his party’s vision to Poland’s foreign partners and reassure investors that the collision course with the EU doesn’t endanger their bets on the $470 million economy.

“Any hope for a reset in Poland’s relations with the EU will probably be dashed by the passage of the judiciary reforms,” said James Sawyer, an analyst at the consultancy Eurasia Group.

Morawiecki is a vocal cheerleader for the main source of his party’s clash with the EU, a vision created by the nation’s most powerful politician, Law & Justice leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski. The prime minister designate has defended the court overhaul as addressing a “widespread pathology in the judiciary” and echoed Kaczynski in saying it’s no business of other countries to decide how a nation imposes the rule of law.

The cumulative effect of the reforms “puts at serious risk the independence of all parts of the Polish judiciary,” the Venice Commission, a democracy watchdog for the Council of Europe human rights group, said in a statement on Friday.

‘National Interests’

Morawiecki, the former head of Poland’s third-biggest bank, Bank Zachodni WBK SA, takes over from Beata Szydlo, who stepped aside halfway through the government’s four-year term. She will become a deputy prime minister, the PAP news service said, without citing anyone.

“We won’t improve our relations with the EU at the expense of our national interests but perhaps we should have better communications with Brussels,” Jacek Sasin, a senior ruling party lawmaker, told private Radio Zet on Friday. “Still, it takes two to tango.”

The commission sees it another way. It’s conducting the first-ever probe into whether a member is upholding the bloc’s democratic values. Leaders including French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel have suggested that Poland may face economic penalties for the erosion of democracy, including possible curbs to the tens of billions of euros of development aid that have driven the country’s economic growth for more than a decade.

Market Implications

The zloty gained 0.2 percent to 4.2013 per euro as of 5:13 p.m. in Warsaw, extending this year’s advance at 4.8 percent, the best performance among emerging-market currencies following the Czech koruna. Investors said there were few market implications as Morawiecki was a trusted figure.

“The assessment of the economic policy by Morawiecki remains generally positive among foreign investors,” ING Bank Slaski analysts, led by Rafal Benecki, said in a note.

Under Kaczynski, who holds the power behind the government and was decisive in replacing Szydlo, Law & Justice has followed in the footsteps of regional peer Hungary. It’s there that Prime Minister Viktor Orban pledged earlier this decade to transform his country, which is also an EU member, into an “illiberal state” modeled on Russia and Turkey.

As part of that, Morawiecki, 49, has sought to carve out a bigger role for the government in business. This is crucial to his party’s drive to centralize power and steer Poland away from a model based on foreign investment and EU integration that dominated its post-Communist transformation. He has also helped find funding for new welfare spending on families with children, boosting Law & Justice’s support among voters in the country of 38 million people.

He narrowed the budget deficit, an important benchmark for foreign institutional investors who hold 202 billion zloty ($57 billion) of the government’s local-currency bonds. The government didn’t immediately make clear whether he would be replaced or keep the finance portfolio.

“Morawiecki’s modernization agenda may help protect support” of Law & Justice, said Piotr Buras, a political scientist from the European Council on Foreign Relations, a pro-EU think-tank. “But it won’t alter Poland’s institutional course, which is at the center of the conflict with the EU.”

President Andrzej Duda formally nominated Morawiecki as prime minister on Friday and said he hoped the new government can be sworn and win a vote of confidence in parliament next week.

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