Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Austria. Risultati definitivi. Kurz dovrebbe essere il nuovo cancelliere.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2017-10-15.

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Herr Sebastian Kurz ha vinto le elezioni austriache ottenendo il 31.6% dei voti e 62 seggi in parlamento.

Seguono l’Spö con il 26.9%, 52 seggi, e quindi l’Fpö con il 26.0%, 50 seggi.

I Grüne non riescono a passare la soglia, quindi non ottengono alcun deputato.

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«The victory would make Mr Kurz the world’s youngest national leader»

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«Short of a majority, Mr Kurz’s party could seek an alliance with the FPÖ, which campaigned against immigration»

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«He appealed to conservative and right-wing voters with pledges to shut down migrant routes to Europe, cap benefit payments to refugees, and bar immigrants from receiving benefits until they have lived in Austria for five years»

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«The rightward shift was seen as a response to the success of the FPÖ»

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«The current chancellor, Social Democrat leader Christian Kern, looks certain to lose his position after a campaign marred by several scandals, including allegations that his adviser led an online smear campaign against Mr Kurz»

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«Kurz’s ÖVP is expected to form a government with the far-right FPÖ, after he ended a grand coalition government with the center-left SPÖ earlier this year»

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«But an alliance with the populist, far-right FPÖ could prove controversial among Austria’s EU counterparts.»

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Al momento attuale sarebbe del tutto prematuro fare considerazioni generali.

Di certo, Herr Kurz ha la possibilità sia di allearsi con la SPÖ sia con la FPÖ.

L’unica certezza è nel fatto che l’attuale dirigenza dell’Unione Europea farà grandi pressioni per una riedizione della Große Koalition.


Bbc. 2017-10-15. Austrian conservative set to become world’s youngest leader

Austria’s conservative People’s Party (ÖVP), led by 31-year-old Sebastian Kurz, is set to win the country’s general election, projections suggest.

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The victory would make Mr Kurz the world’s youngest national leader.

The People’s Party was set to win 31.5%, followed by the Social Democrats with 27.1% and the far-right Freedom Party (FPÖ) with 25.9%.

Short of a majority, Mr Kurz’s party could seek an alliance with the FPÖ, which campaigned against immigration.

Who is Sebastian Kurz?

Before the election, Mr Kurz served as Europe’s youngest-ever foreign minister, after he was appointed in 2013 aged just 27.

In May 2017 he became the leader of the ÖVP. He began his political career in the youth wing of the party, which he chaired before moving on to serve on Vienna’s city council.

Nicknamed “Wunderwuzzi” (roughly translated – someone who can walk on water), he has been compared to the young leaders of France and Canada, Emmanuel Macron and Justin Trudeau.

Much like Mr Macron, Mr Kurz has created a movement around himself, rebranding the ÖVP – which has been in power for more than 30 years – as “The New People’s Party”.

What were the main issues?

Immigration was the dominant issue in the run-up to the vote, and Mr Kurz moved his party to the right in the wake of Europe’s 2015 refugee crisis.

He appealed to conservative and right-wing voters with pledges to shut down migrant routes to Europe, cap benefit payments to refugees, and bar immigrants from receiving benefits until they have lived in Austria for five years.

The rightward shift was seen as a response to the success of the FPÖ, which narrowly missed out on the presidency in December when Norbert Hofer was defeated by Alexander Van der Bellen, head of the Greens.

The stance proved popular with Austrian voters after a huge influx of undocumented migrants and refugees from the Middle East and North Africa.

The FPÖ accused Mr Kurz of stealing their policies. Their candidate, Heinz-Christian Strache, has called him an “imposter”.

Mr Kurz looks to be on course to win the lion’s share of the vote but not a majority. If the polls are correct, he will need to form a coalition, most likely with the FPÖ.

The last coalition between the Social Democrats and the conservatives fell apart this spring – and there may be reluctance to renew it. But an alliance with the populist, far-right FPÖ could prove controversial among Austria’s EU counterparts.

Polls currently put the FPÖ at an all all-time high of 26.9%, suggesting that the European far-right is not dead after emphatic defeats in France and the Netherlands.

The relative success of the FPÖ follows an electoral breakthrough by the far right in neighbouring Germany last month.

What about the opposition?

The current chancellor, Social Democrat leader Christian Kern, looks certain to lose his position after a campaign marred by several scandals, including allegations that his adviser led an online smear campaign against Mr Kurz.

Mr Kern said on Sunday he had no intention of standing down as leader, despite the party’s loss. “I have said I will stay in politics for 10 years and there are nine years to go,” he told broadcaster OBF.

After a tumultuous year with internal rifts, the pro-refugee Greens party is among several smaller parties uncertain of reaching the 4% threshold required to enter parliament.


Deutsche Welle. 2017-10-15. Austrian elections: Young, conservative Sebastian Kurz’s People’s Party wins poll

At just 31, Sebastian Kurz appears set to become Austria’s next chancellor after his People’s Party won the most votes in parliamentary elections. The far-right Freedom Party may be key to his government.

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At just 31, Sebastian Kurz appears set to become Austria’s next chancellor after his People’s Party won the most votes in parliamentary elections on Sunday.

The People’s Party (ÖVP) won 31.6 percent of the vote in Sunday’s parliamentary elections, marking a major victory for the 31-year-old, according to the latest vote count by state broadcaster ORF. If the ÖVP keeps that vote count, they’re set to lead parliament with at least 62 seats.

“I can promise you today that I will fight for change in this country with all my power,” Kurz told supporters at a rally. “I accept this responsibility with great humility.”

The right coalition

The far-right, anti-immigration Austrian Freedom Party (FPÖ) came in third place with 26 percent, amounting to 51 seats, while the center-left Social Democratic Party (SPÖ) managed to garner 26.9 percent, placing them in second with 53 seats.

Kurz’s ÖVP is expected to form a government with the far-right FPÖ, after he ended a grand coalition government with the center-left SPÖ earlier this year. It would mark the first time the far-right party enters government since 2000.

However, Finance Minister Hans Jörg Schelling, a member of the ÖVP, told DW that the center-right party – as a whole – is open to talks with both the FPÖ and the Social Democrats. Meanwhile, SPÖ chief Christian Kern said he will stay on as his party’s leader despite losing to his government’s junior coalition partner.

Greens out?

The New Austrian and Liberal Forum (NEOS) picked up 5.1 percent of the vote, amounting to 10 seats, which remains roughly unchanged from the 2013 election.

The Green Party took a beating, losing 8.5 percent compared to the 2013 election. The Greens managed to garner 3.9 percent of the vote, which isn’t enough to make it to parliament.

The Greens’ lead candidate Ulrike Lunacek said the election result has been difficult to stomach, describing it as a “heavy defeat and a great disappointment.” However, an offshoot party led by former Greens member Peter Pilz managed to gain 4.4 percent of the vote, amounting to 8 seats.

Migration: Austria’s main concern

Before the elections, campaigning focused on migration, notably the 2015 migration crisis that polarized European politics.

That year, Austria was used as a gateway for nearly 900,000 migrants making their way to Germany. It also received more than 68,000 application for asylum in 2015, one of the highest proportions on the continent compared to the population.

While the center-left SPÖ campaigned on a track-record of lowering unemployment and economic growth, Kurz’s ÖVP promised to prevent a repeat of 2015’s wave of migration and cut access to social welfare benefits for newcomers for at least five years. In a poll by state broadcaster ORD, 55 percent of respondents that voted for the ÖVP said they did so because of their stance on asylum and integration.

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