Pubblicato in: Amministrazione

Georgia. Martedì 20 si vota alle suppletive.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2017-06-19.

Georgia (USA) 001

«A special election will be held on June 20, 2017, to determine the member of the United States House of Representatives for Georgia’s 6th congressional district. Republican Incumbent Tom Price resigned from the seat following his appointment and confirmation as the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services in the Trump Administration. A primary election occurred on April 18, 2017.

Georgia’s state law requires the Governor of Georgia to call for a special election to be held at least 30 days after a vacancy. Following Price’s resignation, Governor Nathan Deal called for the special election to be held on April 18, with a filing window for prospective candidates from February 13 to 15, 2017. All candidates ran on one ballot, with a runoff election scheduled for June 20, 2017, for the first- and second-place finishers, if no candidate received 50% of the vote.

No candidate reached a majority of the vote on April 18, leading to a runoff election on June 20, 2017. The candidates in the runoff will be Republican candidate Karen Handel and Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff. Ossoff received 48.1% of the vote and Handel received 19.8% of the vote. Democratic candidates combined to receive about 49 percent of the total vote, while Republican candidates combined to receive about 51 percent of the total vote.

The election has attracted exceptional national interest, with both major parties perceiving it as an opportunity to shape the political narrative prior to the 2018 midterm elections.» [Fonte]

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Le proiezioni più accreditate indicherebbero il democratico Mr Jon Ossoff al 49% e la candidata repubblicana Mrs Karen Handel al 51%. Un testa a testa al momento impredicibile.

Tuttavia si dovrebbe notare come Real Clear Politics fornisca dati previsionali totalmente differenti: Mr Ossoff avrebbe 28.3 punti percentuali di vantaggio su Mrs Handel.

2017-06-18__Georgia__001

Di fronte a discrepanze di questa portata ogni commento sarebbe a nostro parere inutile. Verosimilmente le prime proiezioni sono raccolte a livello statale, mentre le seconde solo nel 6° Distretto.

Pur essendo elezioni locali il cui risultato sarà del tutto ininfluente sulla composizione del Congresso, l’interesse federale è massimo, perché molti vorrebbero interpretarlo come un referendum sull’Operato di Mr. Trump, il Presidente.

Questa è una posizione a nostro avviso incorretta, anche considerando che i due candidati hanno incentrato le proprie campagne elettorali su temi prettamente locali e che l’elettorato del 6° distretto è atipico per la Georgia.

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Di interesse globale invece emergerebbe un altro fattore.

Queste elezioni sono al momento quelle che hanno fatto mobilitare la maggior quantità di fondi nella storia americana.

La Georgia è al momento uno stato controllato dai repubblicani.

«The current Governor of Georgia is Nathan Deal, who was elected as a Republican in 2010, and reflected for a second four-year term in 2014. The Lieutenant Governor is Casey Cagle. Other elected state executive officials include Secretary of State Brian P. Kemp, Attorney General Sam Olens, Commissioner of Insurance Ralph Hudgens, and Superintendent of Schools John Barge.

The Georgia General Assembly has been controlled by the Republicans since 2004. They have majorities over the Democrats in both the Senate and House of Representatives by margins of 38 to 18 and 119 to 60 to 1 respectively as of 2015. In congressional elections, Georgia is now represented in the U.S. Senate by David Perdue and Johnny Isakson, who are both Republicans. The state also sends 14 members to the U.S. House of Representatives, which in 2015 included 10 Republicans and 4 Democrats. » [Fonte]

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«On Tuesday, voters outside Atlanta will head to the polls to fill the seat in the U.S. House of Representatives left vacant when President Donald Trump tapped Republican Tom Price to serve as his Secretary of Health and Human Services»

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«The Democratic candidate, Jon Ossoff, a 30-year-old documentary-film producer and former congressional aide, has drawn national attention and managed to raise an incredible $23.6 million, largely from donors outside of the district and state»

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«Some of the nation’s largest political organizations on the left have been pouring in resources to the race too, itching to capitalize off anti-Trump sentiment and hoping take back a seat in the Republican-held Congress»

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Questo sarebbe il quarto stato ad aver indetto elezioni suppletive dalla data della vittoria del Presidente Trump.

Nelle prime tre la vittoria ha arriso ai repubblicani, pur essendo state condotte in stati a maggioranza democratica.

Questo spiega la dovizia di mezzi dei quali ha goduto Mr. Ossoff, fondi arrivatigli principalmente da fonti non georgiane.


ABC. 2017-06-17. An inside look at Georgia’s upcoming special election – maybe the priciest US House race ever

On Tuesday, voters outside Atlanta will head to the polls to fill the seat in the U.S. House of Representatives left vacant when President Donald Trump tapped Republican Tom Price to serve as his Secretary of Health and Human Services.

The much-anticipated special election will go down in history as one of the most expensive congressional races ever. The Democratic candidate, Jon Ossoff, a 30-year-old documentary-film producer and former congressional aide, has drawn national attention and managed to raise an incredible $23.6 million, largely from donors outside of the district and state. Historically, the next closest House race in terms of dollars raised was Speaker Paul Ryan’s $19.8 million victory in 2016, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

Some of the nation’s largest political organizations on the left have been pouring in resources to the race too, itching to capitalize off anti-Trump sentiment and hoping take back a seat in the Republican-held Congress. A decisive win in the district could send a message ahead of the 2018 midterm elections that Democrats have a shot in traditionally Republican districts.

Ossoff won 48.1 percent of the vote during a primary in April, but failed to win the simple majority needed to take the seat outright. He now faces Republican Karen Handel, Georgia’s former secretary of state. By comparison, Handel has raised over $4.2 million, an impressive figure on its own. The amount of money going into the race is unprecedented, especially in a special election. In the year leading up to the 2016 election for the seat, Price raised $2,300,000 before easily defeating the Democratic candidate with 61.8 percent of the vote.

Before the special primary in April, Ossoff had already raised $8 million and Handel $467,000. Comparatively, ahead of the South Carolina fifth congressional district special election, which will also take place Tuesday, Democratic challenger Archie Parnell has raised $559,000.

Given the national attention, both Ossoff and Handel have raised money from around the country — not just at home. While the most cash was raised locally in Georgia, donors from California and New York sent considerable cash in too. According to FEC data, Ossoff has raised $578,000 in Georgia, $536,356.61 from sources in California, and $423,000 from New York.

Handel has received $340,000 from within Georgia, $16,200.00 from California, and $8,400.00 from New York donors.

According to the Ossoff campaign, their average contribution is less than $50, with two thirds of donations coming in at amounts less than $200. Senator Bernie Sanders has not made a big push to help Ossoff fundraise, but instead is focusing on candidates with a more populist economic message, such as Virginia gubernatorial primary candidate Tom Perriello, who earned Sanders’ endorsement before losing to Ralph Northam.

“This guy Ossoff is going to win because Democrats put gazillions of dollars into that race and they didn’t do that in the other two [earlier special election] races where the candidates widely outperformed Hillary Clinton… This is a testament to what happens when you put resources into a race versus not putting resources into a race,” a long time progressive strategist, who asked not to be named, told ABC News.

According to the strategist, his fellow progressives were frustrated that the party did not spend more money on other special election races earlier this year in Kansas and Montana, and do not think a potential Ossoff win should be treated as an indicator of the only type of Democratic candidate that can win.

Despite the cash and volunteer support coming in, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) insists Ossoff faces an uphill battle.

“Even with Ossoff’s considerable war chest and an unequaled grassroots army, Republicans hold numerous structural advantages, which is why the DCCC has invested heavily in expanding the electorate and persuading swing Georgians to vote their Ossoff,” the national political organization said in a statement in May.

The DCCC has contributed over $6 million — including almost $5 million on Atlanta TV, radio, and digital advertising — against Handel. A significant portion of this funding has gone specifically towards mobilizing black and young voters.

The Democratic National Committee has been actively promoting his candidacy and fundraising off of anti-Trump sentiment in minorities, women, and millennials in the district to raise more money as well. Earlier this month, the DNC announced that it will support the Democratic Party of Georgia’s efforts to target new voters who did not vote in the primary by paying for 10 additional field organizers. The DCCC contributed an eight person team to help train and lead the Ossoff campaign, and the organization’s deputy national field director has been embedded in Georgia since the primary in April.

Online efforts, like a fundraiser by the website Daily Kos through the Democratic nonprofit ActBlue, have raised nearly $2 million from over 100,000 individual donations for the Ossoff campaign. The ActBlue donation page for Ossoff states “flipping this seat from red to blue would send shockwaves through Congress — and replacing Trump’s anti-Obamacare point man with a Democrat would be an amazing little cherry on top.”

Erin Hill, Executive Director of ActBlue, told ABC News that fundraising levels for Ossoff are in the top five of all the candidates and entities that have ever used ActBlue. Hill sees the success of Ossoff’s fundraising as a “harbinger of things to come” and notes that ActBlue is “seeing donations like never before.” The organization has surpassed $200 million raised in the first five months of 2017, the same amount raised in all of 2015.

“People really want to have their voices heard,” said Hill.

Swing Left, an organization focusing on assisting democratic candidates in swing districts supported by Hillary Clinton’s Onward Together nonprofit group, has also made major fundraising efforts, reminding voters that Ossoff fell short of an April victory by only 3,700 votes.

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