Pubblicato in: Criminalità Organizzata, Devoluzione socialismo

Merkel. I numeri di un Glossplan fallito.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2017-06-10.

 Das Brandenburger Tor in Berlin

«we Europeans must really take our fate into our own hands» [Bundeskanzlerin Frau Merkel – NYT]

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«Make our planet great again» [Emmanuel Macron – Cnn]

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«the Russian leader suggested that the Europeans had “bosses” in Washington whom they couldn’t disobey — not the right note to strike as Europe seeks to bolster its global role.» [Mr Putin – Bloomberg]

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«Bisogna smetterla di parlare degli Stati Uniti d’Europa,  la gente non li vuole» [JC Juncker]

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«La Germania ha bisogno di immigrati»

Questo è lo slogan sostenuto per lungo tempo dalla Bundeskanzlerin Frau Merkel.

«The figures were released in a report issued by the German government’s Bundesagentur für Arbeit (Federal Agency for Employment, BA) in Berlin»

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«The official number of “refugees” who have invaded Germany since 2015 stands at over 1.5 million, and the paltry 135,000 “working refugees” include all those employed in the “one euro” jobs which entail cooking at, and cleaning, invader camps around the country»

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«only about 40 percent of the invaders claim to have secondary school education, and at least 20 percent only have elementary school education»

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«Often they simply aren’t able to take up a job that’s offered to them because the company is too far from where they live» [SAP spokesman]

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«They [refugees] come from countries with educational systems where science is barely taught, and that’s what you need for a job at Bayer» [Bayer spokesperson]

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Cerchiamo di ragionare.

Una cosa sono gli slogan, le altisonanti parole dette durante le campagne elettorali oppure quelle che patrocinano interessi di vil bottega sotto un manto umanitario, ed una totalmente differente sono i numeri.

La Germania aveva, ed ha, talmente bisogno di immigrati che ne ha introdotto al lavoro solo il 7%, 135,000 su di un milione e mezzo.

Non solo.

Queste statistiche considerano “occupati” anche quelli che hanno un lavoro da “one euro“: ossia, non lavorano per nulla. Gli ‘occupato’ veri sono 34,000, e secondo il Financial Times, le grandi ditte ne hanno assunti solo 54 (cinquantaquattro).

È un Glossplan fallito. Frau Merkel è una fallita.


New Observer. 2017-06-01. Only 7% of “Refugee” Invaders Working in Germany—And Even Those are in “Made-up” Jobs

The leftist claim that the “refugee influx” would boost Germany economically has been exposed as a lie by an official report which revealed that only 135,000 of the invaders have any sort of job—and even most of those are in made-up government-subsidized jobs or “training schemes.”

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The figures were released in a report issued by the German government’s Bundesagentur für Arbeit (Federal Agency for Employment, BA) in Berlin. 

The official number of “refugees” who have invaded Germany since 2015 stands at over 1.5 million, and the paltry 135,000 “working refugees” include all those employed in the “one euro” jobs which entail cooking at, and cleaning, invader camps around the country.

Liberals who support the invasion still claim that the influx will “boost the economy” and “solve the pension crisis caused by an aging European population”—but the facts have shown the exact opposite.

Instead of “boosting the economy,” the invaders have instead added immensely to the welfare cost, the report continued.

There are now at least half a million “main claimants” who are “refugees” on the German welfare system, known as Hartz IV. A “main claimant” is the family member who claims on behalf of his or her extended family, which usually amounts to at least four people.

This means that, conservatively, there are at least two million Hartz claimants—with the difference between the “refugee” numbers and welfare users being explained by the “family reunification” process which allows successful “refugees” to bring their families to Germany as well.

According to Dr. Herbert Brücker, head of the Department for Economic Migration Research at the Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research, only about 40 percent of the invaders claim to have secondary school education, and at least 20 percent only have elementary school education—while the rest have none at all.

 


Bild. 2017-06-01. 135 000 Flüchtlinge haben einen regulären Job

Seit Januar 2015 haben 1,5 Millionen Menschen Asyl in Deutschland beantragt – rund die Hälfte hat einen positiven Bescheid erhalten, darf also in Deutschland arbeiten. 

[Riportato parzialmente perché protetto da copyright]


Deutsche Welle. 2017-05-19. German parliament passes tighter asylum laws

German lawmakers have passed a series of laws concerning the deportation, monitoring and access to personal data of asylum seekers. The new legislation has been met with sharp criticism.

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German authorities will be allowed to deport rejected asylum seekers more quickly and regularly under a series of new asylum laws passed on Thursday.

The Bundestag said the new laws would guarantee “the improved enforcement of deportation rulings.” Rejected asylum seekers deemed to be a security threat will be deported faster or monitored with an electronic ankle bracelet.

Deportation orders against rejected asylum seekers can now be imposed even without assurance that the person in question would be repatriated within three months. A migrant could therefore be issued a deportation order even if the country origin fails to provide the necessary documentation or passport papers. This law was among the key new regulations for the German government, after the Berlin Christmas market attacker, Anis Amri, saw his deportation order waived when the Tunisian government couldn’t provide the necessary papers.

Authorities, meanwhile, will also be allowed to detain individuals suspected to be a threat to security for a maximum of 10 days, rather than the previous limit of four days.

Another new piece of legislation allows Germany’s Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF) to access asylum seekers’ personal electronic devices in order to verify the identities of those without official identification papers.

Draft laws further tightened before vote

Any migrant found to have given a false identity upon entering Germany will see their freedom of movement strictly limited. The same penalty would also apply to migrants without the right to remain in Germany, but who nevertheless refuse to leave on their own volition.

German authorities would also instruct asylum seekers deemed to have few prospects in the country to remain in reception centers until their asylum procedures have been completed.

Germany’s federal and 16 state governments had already agreed to the new asylum laws back in February. However, on Wednesday the ruling coalition government, made up of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrats (CDU) and the Social Democratic Party (SPD), introduced a number of stricter laws to the draft bill.

One of the rules introduced at the eleventh hour would prohibit failed asylum seekers from acquiring the right to stay by abusing a law that allows migrant fathers to remain if their child is born in Germany.

Another law would make it easier for state authorities and the Federal Criminal Police Office (BKA) to share and compare data.

Rights groups and welfare organizations decry new laws

Rights groups, welfare organizations and opposition parties condemned the tighter asylum laws as an assault on fundamental rights of people seeking protection.

The federal government was dismantling several legal hurdles that had been set up to protect people from undue detention, Maria Scharlau, a Berlin-based legal expert for Amnesty International, said. Laws concerning access to migrants’ smartphones presented a “major encroachment into the privacy of tens of thousands of people,” without providing any particularly robust conditions, she claimed.

“This law will change Germany from being a host country to one focused on deporting new arrivals,” Germany’s refugee aid organization, Pro Asyl, said amid its criticism of the bill.

The social welfare organization AWO warned that the tighter laws would also see an increasing number of people who require protection becoming disenfranchised.

De Maiziere argues against critics

German Interior Minister defended the new laws on Thursday, along with a number of CDU and SPD lawmakers.

“Our position is clear,” de Maiziere said. “Help and integration for those who need our protection; hardship and repatriation for those who don’t require protection, and in particular for those whose dishonesty makes them culpable.

De Maiziere added that it was unacceptable that certain “asylum seekers are allowed to go unpunished despite having registered under a host of different names and nationalities.”

 


Deutsche Welle. 2017-05-19. Germany limits refugee family reunions from Greece

The German government has significantly cut back on family reunions for refugees arriving from Greece, local media reported. Germany has taken in over a million people and is facing “limited capacity.”

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German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere has reduced the number of asylum-seeker family members allowed into the country from Greece to 70 a month, German news group RedaktionsNetzwerk Deutschland reported on Friday.

The group of local papers said the information was provided by Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government following a request from the Left Party. In its response, the Interior Ministry said the decrease in numbers had to do with “limited support and accommodation capacities,” as well as the “considerable logistical coordination effort by state and federal authorities.”

Left lawmaker Ulla Jelpke described the explanation as a “miserable excuse,” and accused the government of shirking its responsibilities under the EU’s Dublin regulation. The law stipulates that separated refugee and asylum-seeking families are entitled to a legal reunion once an immediate relative arrives in a country covered by the Dublin rule.

“The federal government is trampling all over EU law and child welfare,” Jelpke said, adding that the cap should be removed because there was a need for as many as 400 refugee family members per month to be reunited with their loved ones in Germany. 

Overstretched asylum system

The European Union took in some 1.6 million refugees and migrants – most of them from Syria – between 2014 and 2016.  The majority arrived in Germany via frontline states like Italy and Greece. But the scale of the influx prompted many countries to introduce extra controls and to close their borders, blocking the so-called Balkan route and leaving tens of thousands of people stranded in Greece’s refugee camps. 

According to information published by Greek newspaper “Efimerida ton Synakton”, around 2,000 refugees are waiting in Greece to be reunited with their families in Germany. It reported that Germany received only 70 Dublin transfers from Greece in April under the new cap, compared to 540 in March and 370 in February. Given the large number of arrivals and asylum requests, family reunion claims often require more time for processing. The UN’s refugee agency has urged European countries to speed up the procedure to prevent further hardship for refugees, many of whom have already endured dangerous journeys in escaping conflict in their home countries. 

Sharing the burden

The EU is attempting to lighten the burden for countries hosting refugees by introducing mandatory relocation quotas for member states. Thus far Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic and others have resisted the plan, citing security concerns. The European Commission is expected to decide next month on possible legal action against countries unwilling to accept asylum-seekers.

At a meeting of interior ministers in Brussels on Thursday, Germany’s de Maiziere said he hoped for progress by June. “We should concentrate on the issues where an understanding is easier to achieve: efficient procedures, quicker returns and avoiding secondary migration,” he told reporters in Brussels.

“Maybe the very difficult issue of redistribution becomes easier when we have an agreement on these other issues.”

 


The European Union Times. 2017-05-25. Only 7% of Refugees Working in Germany and Even Those are in Made-up Jobs.

The leftist claim that the “refugee influx” would boost Germany economically has been exposed as a lie by an official report which revealed that only 135,000 of the invaders have any sort of job—and even most of those are in made-up government-subsidized jobs or “training schemes.”

The figures were released in a report issued by the German government’s Bundesagentur für Arbeit (Federal Agency for Employment, BA) in Berlin.

The official number of “refugees” who have invaded Germany since 2015 stands at over 1.5 million, and the paltry 135,000 “working refugees” include all those employed in the “one euro” jobs which entail cooking at, and cleaning, invader camps around the country.

Liberals who support the invasion still claim that the influx will “boost the economy” and “solve the pension crisis caused by an aging European population”—but the facts have shown the exact opposite.

Instead of “boosting the economy,” the invaders have instead added immensely to the welfare cost, the report continued.

There are now at least half a million “main claimants” who are “refugees” on the German welfare system, known as Hartz IV. A “main claimant” is the family member who claims on behalf of his or her extended family, which usually amounts to at least four people.

This means that, conservatively, there are at least two million Hartz claimants—with the difference between the “refugee” numbers and welfare users being explained by the “family reunification” process which allows successful “refugees” to bring their families to Germany as well.

According to Dr. Herbert Brücker, head of the Department for Economic Migration Research at the Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research, only about 40 percent of the invaders claim to have secondary school education, and at least 20 percent only have elementary school education—while the rest have none at all.


NTM. 2017-05-09. ‘Ankommen’ Welcome App Has 135,000 Users in Germany

The ‘Ankommen’ app is an application for mobiles running iOS and Android designed for helping asylum seekers and refugees integrating in Germany.

Since it was launched last January, it has been downloaded 135,000 times, German media reported.

Ankommen can be translated as “arrived”.

“You have a long and difficult journey behind you, but now you have arrived in Germany. However, ‘arrived’ in German means a lot more: become part of society and join in. This app will help you do this,” the official website of Ankommen states.

Through the app, asylum seekers and refugees can get different kind of information and services:

– Learning German: the app provides the user with a general introduction to the German language, with language exercises.

– Living in Germany: the app includes success stories of foreigners who have integrated in German society; with information about shopping, food and drinking habits, health information (What if I become ill? vaccinations, pregnancy, etc.), information related to mobility and transport, schooling and education, politics in Germany and even directions on how to separate rubbish or on how to become member of a local sport club.

– Asylum: Ankommen provides precise instructions on the first steps an asylum seeker should take upon arrival in Germany. It informs users about registration, reception, asylum claims, steps to take if an asylum application is rejected, as well as explaining rights and obligations of refugees.

– Jobs and apprenticeship: the app explains in detail the requirements for accessing the employment system in Germany, including how to find a job and vocational training opportunities.

The application is free of charge and is available in English, French, German, Arabic and Farsi. It can be downloaded here:

iOS version for iPhone

Android version

The ‘Ankommen’ app was developed by the German Federal Office for Migration and Refugees, the Federal Agency for Labour, the Goethe Institut and the TV Bayerischen Rundfunk.

 


NTM. 2016-12-19. 1.2 Million migrants arrived in Germany in two years: just 34,000 or 2.8% have found a job

ONLY 34,000 refugees out of 1.2 million who have arrived in Germany over the past two years have managed to get a job.

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The government’s Institute for Labour Research (IAB) also said that of the employed, nearly a quarter are on temporary contracts.

The numbers apply to refugees mostly from Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and Eritrea.

“If we manage to get 50 percent of them into work which pays for their lives in five years, that’d certainly be a success,” said Joachim Möller, director of the IAB.

“But it would be an illusion to believe that we will manage to find jobs for a decent proportion of refugees in well-paid industry jobs like car manufacturing.”

This means the burden of feeding, housing and caring for them will continue to soar into the billions and fall upon the German taxpayer.

One bright side is that the crisis has created an estimated 60,000 jobs for Germans in social work, teaching and in security for the numerous asylum centres around the country.

Mr Möller believes that the full impact of the refugee influx will only be properly gauged in five or six years time.

“It probably won’t lead to us making money, but diversity can have positive effects,” he added.

The Kiel Institute for the World Economy published last week, suggested that by the end of 2018, more refugees will be employed than out of work.

 


Financial Times. 2016-07-15. Survey reveals Germany’s top companies employ just 54 refugees

Germany’s deputy chancellor has written to bosses of the country’s leading companies demanding they hire more refugees, after a survey found they had taken on a grand total of just 54. About 1m migrants arrived in Germany last year, about a third of them refugees from Syria. Angela Merkel’s government has made it a priority to integrate them into the German labour market as quickly as possible. But despite the large number of vacancies in the German jobs market — 665,000 in June — it has proven harder than expected to recruit the refugees into the workforce. A survey by the Frankfurter Allgemeine newspaper of the top 30 German companies found that they had together employed just 54 refugees. Fifty of them were hired by one company, Deutsche Post. In his letter, Sigmar Gabriel, economics minister and leader of the centre-left Social Democrats, said the smaller enterprises that make up Germany’s Mittelstand had been building bridges to enable refugees to enter the labour market. “But without the flagships of the German economy, without you, the bridge is not yet complete,” he wrote. “Show that the biggest companies in this country are not only the best at revenues and profits . . . but also when it comes to integrating [refugees].” A spokesman for Bayer, the German pharmaceuticals group, said that while refugees were motivated and willing to learn, “they come from countries with educational systems where science is barely taught, and that’s what you need for a job at Bayer.” He said the company had so far not employed a single refugee. When the migrant crisis reached its height last year, Germany’s bosses were initially optimistic about the newcomers’ chances. Dieter Zetsche, chief executive of Daimler, the carmaker, said at the time that they could lay the foundation for the “next German economic miracle”.

But since then, expectations that they could fill Germany’s skills gap have been radically scaled back. Authorities say the main problem is a lack of professional qualifications and German language skills. According to official statistics, of the nearly 300,000 refugees currently registered as looking for work, 74 per cent have had no vocational training and a quarter do not even have a school-leaving certificate. Nine per cent have a degree. There is also evidence that thousands are slipping through the cracks of a system that is supposed to ensure nearly everyone is either in work or education. Figures from the Federal Employment Agency, released late last month, showed that 131,000 refugees are neither employed nor enrolled on any courses or training programmes. Other German companies contacted by the FT rejected Mr Gabriel’s criticism. A spokesman for SAP, the German software group, said: “For many companies it all comes down to cost.

 “They have to weigh up if they can afford to employ a person who perhaps doesn’t have the appropriate qualifications and whose language skills are lacking.” A Daimler spokesman suggested Mr Gabriel was being unrealistic. “Everybody expects an instant solution, but there’s no such thing,” he said. Several of the companies contacted said they had created special internships and apprenticeships for refugees. Daimler has one of the largest programmes, with 300 asylum-seekers passing through its 14-week “bridge internship” in the first half of the year. Of the forty interns who had worked at the Mercedes-Benz factory near Stuttgart, most had received offers of employment in the industry, or been offered an apprenticeship at Daimler, the company said.

Steelmaker ThyssenKrupp has also created 230 additional internships specially for refugees and 150 more apprenticeships. But at most other companies, the schemes are much smaller in scale. For example, the nine-month vocational course for refugees run by Eon, the German utility, has space for just 15 people, while four migrants are doing an introductory training placement at the company.

It said one problem was the lack of interest in long apprenticeships. “Many refugees want to, and have to, start working fast, but training takes a long time,” an Eon spokesman said. Rocket Internet, the Berlin-based technology group, said it had created two internships for refugees, but had been unable to fill them. Bayer’s advanced training course has 20 places, but 10 remain unfilled. Others blamed German bureaucracy, particularly the tough restrictions on where refugees can live. “Often they simply aren’t able to take up a job that’s offered to them because the company is too far from where they live,” said the SAP spokesman. “For us it would be a big help if the refugees could determine their place of residence themselves.”

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