Pubblicato in: Banche Centrali, Economia e Produzione Industriale, Geopolitica America del Nord

Trump. Nafta addio? Sembrerebbe molto probabile.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2017-04-27.

2017-04-27__Nafta__001

«Il North American Free Trade Agreement (Accordo nordamericano per il libero scambio), conosciuto anche con l’acronimo NAFTA, nei paesi di lingua spagnola, come TLCAN (Tratado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte o più semplicemente TLC) e, nel Canada francese come ALÉNA (Accord de libre-échange nord-américain), è un trattato di libero scambio commerciale stipulato tra Stati Uniti, Canada e Messico e modellato sul già esistente accordo di libero commercio tra Canada e Stati Uniti (FTA), a sua volta ispirato al modello dell’Unione europea.»

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«It was published just days after Trump levied a tariff on imports of softwood lumber from Canada, decrying unfair competition.»

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«People are getting more nervous after the U.S. imposed a tariff to Canada»

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«Report says move is still under consideration at White House»

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«A week ago, the U.S. president called Nafta a “disaster.”»

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Insomma, non tirano mica più certi venti.

I bond messicani stanno riducendo le quotazioni in modo significativo.

America first.


Bloomberg. 2017-04-26. Here Are the Markets Moving on Reports That Trump Will Drop Nafta

– Mexican peso sinks along with shares of Kansas City Southern

– Report says move is still under consideration at White House

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Mexico’s peso, the Canadian dollar and shares of companies that rely on cross-border trade plunged on speculation the Trump administration was close to scrapping Nafta. The moves slowed a surge in riskier assets sparked by President Donald Trump’s promise to unveil Wednesday a proposal to overhaul U.S. taxes.

The administration has prepared a draft of an executive order to withdraw from the trade accord, Politico reported Wednesday, citing White House officials it didn’t identify. The move is still under internal debate, according to the article. It was published just days after Trump levied a tariff on imports of softwood lumber from Canada, decrying unfair competition. A week ago, the U.S. president called Nafta a “disaster.”

“People are getting more nervous after the U.S. imposed a tariff to Canada,” said Andres Jaime, a foreign-exchange strategist at Barclays Plc in New York.

1) The Mexican peso dropped the most since January.

2) Shares of Kansas City Southern, which gets half its revenue from Mexico, plunged as much as 4.2 percent after the report.

3) Canada’s dollar reversed earlier gains.

4) Mexican auto-parts maker Nemak SAB sank to a two-month low.

5) Magna International Inc., a Canadian parts supplier, erased a gain and traded lower.

6) The cost to insure Mexican government bonds against default jumped the most in a month.

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