Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Brexit. Il Parlamento. 498 Y versus 114 N.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2017-02-02.

dore-better-to-reign-in-hell-than-serve-in-heaven-lucifer

«MPs have voted by a majority of 384 to allow Theresa May to get Brexit negotiations under way»

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«The bill now faces further scrutiny in the Commons and the House of Lords before it can become law.»

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«The prime minister has set a deadline of 31 March for invoking Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, getting official talks with the EU started»

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«Brexit Secretary David Davis saying that voting against it would be to “ignore” last June’s referendum, in which voters opted by 51.9% to 48.1% in favour of Brexit.»

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C’è poco da fare. Adesso tutti i socialisti europei strilleranno che gli inglesi sono diventati “populisti“: gente che sta a sentire cosa vorrebbe fare il ‘popolo sovrano‘ e poi lo fa per davvero!

I passi ulteriori sembrerebbero essere mere formalità: 498 voti contro 114 sono una schiacciante maggioranza.

Entro il 31 marzo Mrs May avvierà l’art. 50 per dar esito al Brexit.

Se poi si aggiungessero buone nuove dalle elezioni olandesi di metà marzo e da quelle francesi di fine aprile, l’isolamento di Mr Juncker e di Frau Merkel sarebbe completo, resterebbero soli a regnare ancora per qualche tempo in quello che si preannuncia essere l’inferno europeo.

«Better to reign in Hell,

than serve in Heaven


Bbc. 2017-02-01. MPs overwhelmingly back Brexit bill

MPs have voted by a majority of 384 to allow Theresa May to get Brexit negotiations under way.

They backed the government’s European Union Bill, supported by the Labour leadership, by 498 votes to 114.

But the Scottish National Party and the Liberal Democrat leadership opposed the bill, while 47 Labour MPs and Tory ex-chancellor Ken Clarke rebelled.

The bill now faces further scrutiny in the Commons and the House of Lords before it can become law.

The prime minister has set a deadline of 31 March for invoking Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, getting official talks with the EU started.

MPs held two days of debate on the bill, Brexit Secretary David Davis saying that voting against it would be to “ignore” last June’s referendum, in which voters opted by 51.9% to 48.1% in favour of Brexit.

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Analysis

By Laura Kuenssberg – BBC political editor

This time last year few in Westminster really thought that this would happen. The then prime minister’s concern was persuading the rest of the EU to give him a better deal for the UK.

His close colleagues believed the chances of them losing, let alone the government dissolving over the referendum, were slim, if not quite zero.

This isn’t even the last vote on this bill.

There are several more stages, the Lords are likely to kick up rough at the start.

But after tonight, for better or worse, few will believe that our journey to the exit door can be halted.

His Labour shadow, Sir Keir Starmer, said the issue was “difficult” for his party, most of whose MPs had wanted to stay in the EU, but argued it would be undemocratic to ignore the electorate,

Shadow cabinet members Rachael Maskell and Dawn Butler quit the party’s frontbench shortly before the vote, in order to defy their party leader’s orders and oppose the government.

One MP was heard to shout “Suicide” when the result of the vote was announced.

Earlier, the Commons voted against an SNP amendment aimed at scuppering the bill.

The bill was published last week, after the Supreme Court decided MPs and peers must have a say before Article 50 could be triggered.

It rejected the government’s argument that Mrs May had sufficient powers to trigger Brexit without consulting Parliament.

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