Pubblicato in: Criminalità Organizzata, Unione Europea

Juncker, il desaparecidos dell’Unione Europea.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2017-01-27

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Mr Juncker appare nel video allegato all’articolo comparso sull’Express con un volto disfatto, impacciato nel parlare, poco lucido nel rispondere alle domande.

Non è andato a Davos, non è stato invitato a Washington: al momento è a Malta, paese di notoria importanza mondiale.

È l’ombra di ciò che fu in passato.

Possiamo capirlo: nulla di ciò che ha fatto e destinato e rimanere. Lascerà solo lo sgradevole ricordo del suo passaggio.

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Concede interviste agli ultimi giornali amici che gli rimangono, deprivato del fedele scudiero Schulz, che ha abbandonato lui e l’Europa per cercare fortuna in patria, anche se non si potrebbe certo dire che sia stato accolto a braccia aperte.

Diversi i temi trattati.

«Donald Trump should lay off talking about the break-up of the European Union»

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«Juncker told Germany’s BR television, …. that he was sure no EU state wanted to follow Britain’s example and leave the bloc»

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«Mr. Trump should also not be indirectly encouraging them to do that»

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«Juncker, the president of the European Commission, said he had yet to speak to Trump — contrary to what the President-elect said earlier this week»

Prendiamo atto che Mr Juncker disapprova la elezione di Mr Trump e di quanto sia preoccupato di un Brexit bis, oppure anche tris. Dubitiamo però profondamente che Mr Trump si sia impensierito del suo warning, visto poi che lo confonde tranquillamente con Mr Tusk….

E poi, parlare con Tusk e non con Juncker…..

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«Juncker dropped a huge hint about the EU’s strategy for the upcoming Brexit talks by suggesting Britain may continue to be part of Brussels’ club beyond the country’s official departure date»

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«The EU Commission president raised the possibility that the UK will carry on being full members of Europe’s political institutions even after official negotiations on divorce proceedings have been concluded»

Il nostro buon Juncker ha vissuto il Brexit come una terribile calamità naturale della quale non sa darsi ragione.

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«Strikingly a markedly conciliatory tone the Brussels boss insisted he wanted a “fair deal” with Britain which was in the best interests of both sides»

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«Elsewhere Mr Juncker stuck to the mantra that membership of the single market comes with “obligations”, including accepting the free movement of people»

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«The president of the EU commission has said talks on Britain’s departure will be “very, very, very difficult” as Europe’s press turned hostile»

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«We want a fair deal with Britain and a fair deal for Britain»

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«He revealed that eurocrats are largely unperturbed by a perceived threat the PM made towards the EU in her speech»

Ragioniamo.

Mr Juncker ha a cuore la terribile sorte cui andrebbero incontro gli inglesi se uscissero dall’Unione Europea.

Si sente anche così forte da poter mettere in guardia il Presidente Trump.

Tuttavia, Mr Juncker è al momento il desaparecidos dell’Unione Europea.


Reuters. 2017-01-19. Hands off EU, Trump; we don’t back Ohio secession: Juncker

Donald Trump should lay off talking about the break-up of the European Union, the bloc’s chief executive said on Wednesday, pointing out that Europeans do not push for Ohio to secede from the United States.

In pointed remarks on the eve of Trump’s inauguration as U.S. president, Jean-Claude Juncker said the new administration would realize it should not damage transatlantic relations but added it remained unclear what policies Trump would now pursue.

Juncker told Germany’s BR television, according to a transcript from the Munich station, that he was sure no EU state wanted to follow Britain’s example and leave the bloc, despite Trump’s forecast this week that others would quit:

“Mr. Trump should also not be indirectly encouraging them to do that,” Juncker said. “We don’t go around calling on Ohio to pull out of the United States.”

Juncker, the president of the European Commission, said he had yet to speak to Trump — contrary to what the President-elect said earlier this week. Juncker said Trump had confused him with European Council President Donald Tusk.

“Trump spoke to Mr. Tusk and mixed us up,” said Juncker, taking a jab at the American billionaire’s grasp of his new role. “That’s the thing about international politics,” he said. “It’s all in the detail.”


Express. 2017-01-19. Juncker drops huge hint that EU will seek deal that keeps Britain IN the bloc post-Brexit

JEAN-CLAUDE Juncker dropped a huge hint about the EU’s strategy for the upcoming Brexit talks by suggesting Britain may continue to be part of Brussels’ club beyond the country’s official departure date.

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The EU Commission president raised the possibility that the UK will carry on being full members of Europe’s political institutions even after official negotiations on divorce proceedings have been concluded.

Strikingly a markedly conciliatory tone the Brussels boss insisted he wanted a “fair deal” with Britain which was in the best interests of both sides, and revealed he had told Theresa May there was no “hostility” towards the UK from within the EU.

But it was his unguarded remarks about the possibility of British MEPs taking part in the next European Parliament elections, which are slated in for after the UK’s official departure date from the EU, which will get chins wagging in Whitehall.

The next European Parliament elections are scheduled for May 2019 and they only take place once every five years, raising the prospect of the UK remaining tethered to the EU until 2024.

During a press conference at the parliament building in Strasbourg yesterday lunchtime the chief eurocrat was grilled by journalists about his response to Theresa May’s landmark speech on Tuesday, in which she pledged to make a clean Brexit and pull Britain out of the single market.

And whilst congratulating his colleague Antonio Tajani, the Italian MEP who is the new EU Parliament president, he let slip that British politicians could be involved in the Brussels club for many years to come.

He said: “Once again Antonio, all the best for your mandate which will be up to the next European elections without or with the British members of the parliament, this has to be seen.”

Mrs May has promised to trigger Article 50 by the end of March, meaning that Britain is set to leave the club by the same date in 2019. The next European Parliament elections are not scheduled to take place until May 23 that year.

Elsewhere Mr Juncker stuck to the mantra that membership of the single market comes with “obligations”, including accepting the free movement of people, but struck a sober and conciliatory tone towards Mrs May.

He also revealed some details of her phone call with the PM on Tuesday evening, telling reporters: “I was repeating once again that we as a Commission and Michel Barnier as our chief negotiator, we’re not in a hostile mood.

“We want a fair deal with Britain and a fair deal for Britain, but a fair deal means a fair deal for the European Union too.

“I’m quite satisfied that she was taking away from this unclear landscape some elements making it clearer, but our basic position is the same. We will start to negotiate after the triggering of Article 50 and then we’ll see.

He added: “It will be a very, very, very difficult negotiation because Britain has to be considered as a third country which I’m not used. I’m unhappy about this, but that’s the situation we are in and we’ll make the best of it.”

Also at the press conference was the Maltese prime minister Joseph Muscat, who had earlier dismissed parts of Mrs May’s Brexit plan as “detached from reality”, but here was considerably softer towards Britain.

He revealed that eurocrats are largely unperturbed by a perceived threat the PM made towards the EU in her speech, and said they were pleased that her remarks had finally brought clarity on what Britain wants.

He said yesterday: “Reading the British press this morning, I did not see in the prime minister’s words when I heard her first hand the sort of declaration of war that some media are depicting it was.

“I saw this as a statement of clarity on which one might have reservation, but I actually thought it was very welcome that rather than saying that we want to stay in the single market but want exception because our country is different from the others.

“Abandoning that sort of view and saying we’re going to withdraw from the single market because we want to prioritise the control of people coming over from Europe, I respect that because it respects our position.”


The Guardian. 2017-01-19. Juncker says Brexit talks will be ‘very, very, very difficult’ as press turns hostile

European newspapers attack May’s plans as isolationist and unachievable but EU commission says it is not in a hostile mood.

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The president of the EU commission has said talks on Britain’s departure will be “very, very, very difficult” as Europe’s press turned hostile, attacking Theresa May’s Brexit plans as isolationist, unachievable, extremist – and disastrous for the UK.

Speaking to journalists in Strasbourg on Wednesday, Jean-Claude Juncker played down suggestions that May’s speech on Tuesday was a threat to Europe, and emphasised a deal had to reflect the interests of Britain and the EU.

He said he had spoken to the British prime minister on Tuesday evening and told her the commission was not in a hostile mood: “We want a fair deal with Britain and a fair deal for Britain, but a fair deal means a fair deal for the European Union.”

But he added it would be “a very, very, very difficult negotiation” because Britain would be considered as a foreign country to the rest of the EU.

In Berlin, chancellor Angela Merkel welcomed the “clarity” provided by May’s speech but said after talks with the Italian prime minister, Paolo Gentiloni, that the remaining EU member states would begin Brexit talks with a united front. She stressed negotiations could only begin when article 50 was triggered.

“I am not worried that we won’t stand together,” she said. “The most important thing is that Europe will not let itself be divided, and we will ensure this with very close contact.” Gentiloni agreed there would be “solidarity” among the EU 27, but “also of course friendship” with Britain.

But if the politicians and officials were diplomatic, much of the continent’s press was openly scornful. “Little Britain – May leads Britain into isolation,” was the front-page headline in Germany’s Die Welt, while Italy’s La Repubblica opted for: “Brexit: London puts up its wall – out of EU and single market.”

Even more outspoken was Der Spiegel, which summarised May’s negotiating stance as “I want, I want, I want”. In an article also published in English, the magazine’s UK correspondent said Britain’s plans amounted to “wilful self-mutilation”.

May’s speech may have been filled with “a glut of conciliatory adjectives” and “superficial pleasantries”, Christophe Scheuerman wrote, but it was in reality “a catalogue of demands topped with a dash of threat”.

May “promised her country a glorious future” but has little control over it, he said. She will have to offer her allies more than graciously “allowing them to export prosecco and cars” to the UK. “She needs Europe. Adjectives alone won’t help her,” Scheuerman wrote.

El País, Spain’s biggest-selling daily paper, was equally scathing, saying in an editorial that May had set out “a road map for a complete British self-exclusion from the EU” and a “hard, extreme and extremist Brexit”.

The paper said this marked “a radical change of position” from May’s “timid, bashful Europeanism” as home secretary, to support for a “shameful, xenophobic nationalism”. The promise of a positive agreement was fallacious, it said.

For Spain’s ABC, the headline was: “May threatens EU with trade war,” while Denmark’s Politiken said May’s speech marked the moment the British “slam the door hard shut on the EU”.

Le Monde said in an editorial Brexit would be hard “… for the British”. The paper said May had “dressed her speech in the nationalist fire that makes a victory of a defeat” but had in reality been forced to accept facts. “Britain will leave not just the single market but the customs union so as to be able to sign independent trade deals,” the French paper said. “The United Kingdom will end up with a status less favourable than that of Turkey.”

The British believe their government will achieve “all the favourable conditions their prime minister claims she will be able to negotiate,” it said, but “there can be no question of London obtaining a superior status than any EU member country”.

Joseph Muscat, the prime minister of Malta, which holds the EU’s six-month rotating presidency, welcomed May’s announcement that the UK would leave the single market as a sign the government had understood it could not cherrypick the best bits of the EU.

But he, too, said negotiating Brexit would be an “arduous task”, and repeated his assertion that any Brexit deal must be inferior to EU membership. That “should not come as a surprise,” he said. “Thinking it can be otherwise would indicate a detachment from reality.”

Donald Tusk, the president of the European council, welcomed May’s “warm and balanced words” on European integration, which he said showed the UK had accepted and understood the indivisibility of the EU’s single market.

But Tusk added that it appeared a bit more British comprehension was still needed. He said: “It would be good if our partners also understood that there will be no place for pick-and-choose tactics in our future negotiations.”

Juncker pledged in Strasbourg to do everything to make sure “the negotiations will be according to the rules and yield good results”. He said: “To those who think the moment has come to deconstruct Europe and take it to pieces, they are completely wrong.”


Bild. 2017-01-19. „History will prove Angela Merkel right“

Berlin – On Thursday and Friday, another important EU summit will take place in Brussels. BILD talked to Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission.

 

BILD: Mr Juncker, have you ever witnessed anything like the current de-solidarization between the EU member states before?

 

Jean-Claude Juncker: „Of course I would have preferred it if everyone had realized as quickly as Chancellor Merkel that the refugee crisis can only be solved through a joint effort – just like the debt crisis before. But the motto is often “every man for himself”! However, even countries that were initially very critical are now providing concrete help. All countries are showing their solidarity via the EU budget. We have doubled the funds in record time and have mobilized 10.1 billion euros by regrouping means.“

Ahead of the upcoming EU summit, chancellor Merkel still seems isolated.

 

Juncker: „It is part of the job description of a head of government to take a stand and to maintain it while under pressure. Chancellors were always respected when they maintained their direction under difficult circumstances. In particular, I am thinking of Helmut Kohl’s far-seeing reunification policy. History has proven him right, and it will prove Angela Merkel right.“

 

What would it mean for the EU if Merkel were no longer in office?

 

Juncker: „Angela Merkel will outlast all of her current critics in office. The European refugee policy that she and I stand for will be successful. It is a sign of political strength to say “we will accomplish this”. Everything else means giving up in the face of populists.“

Four eastern-European states want to close the Macedonian border to Greece. Will this lower the number of refugees at the German borders?

 

Juncker: „It would be neither legal nor politically acceptable to cooperate with third countries in order to close the border to one of our member states. We support the border security on both sides – the Greek and the Macedonian. We will only be successful if we work together more closely and cooperatively and if we do not destroy any trust. We must not risk Schengen and thereby also our domestic freedom.“

 

Do you still think that the EU will overcome the refugee crisis?

 

Juncker: „As was the case in the debt crisis, a high number of joint steps will be necessary in order to achieve the desired effect. Yes, it will take a while before the measures we in Europe have decided upon over the past weeks and months will be effective. But in Greece, the fingerprints of nine out of ten asylum seekers are now being taken. In September, it was 8%. Due to important decisions by the Turkish government, we can now see a reduction in the number of refugees in the country: according to Frontex, 7,000 refugees came from Turkey to Greece every day in October and 3,500 in December. Now it is 2,000 people. We finally see the first signs of progress.“

Do you interpret the latest call of the EU founding members as a taste of a “two-speed Europe”?

 

Juncker: „I am happy about this affirmation by the EU founding members. Over the history of the EU, thinking ahead and proceeding ambitiously in everybody’s interest has always paid off. This is what we owe the Euro and Schengen to; two achievements that have been heavily criticized – but unfairly so, because they provided us with a high degree of wealth, freedom, and security. Many people in the world are jealous of that.“

 

How big is the chance – in percentage – that a Brexit, an exit of Great Britain from the EU, can be averted?

 

Juncker: „Our best experts are working on the most creative solutions in order to present Great Britain with a deal that is fair for the British, but also for the other member states. Despite the fact that, on the high sea and within European politics, anything is always possible, I am still convinced that the facts of the inner-European market, the EU trade policy and the global importance of Europe will speak for themselves. We need Great Britain in our European family and the British need the European Union.“

Could it be that the EU sometimes has to take a clear step back in terms of integration? Or that at least the next contract amendment will not apply to all 28 member states in the same way?

 

Juncker: „Europe does not operate like the dancing procession of Echternach – famous beyond Luxembourg’s borders – where the participants take two steps ahead and jump one step back. Due to the economic, foreign-policy, social, and demographic challenges that Europe is facing, we cannot afford this. Sometimes Europe might be able to take small steps or to take a break in order to gain a new momentum. We will need some momentum in the following weeks and months. The refugee crisis in particular shows that we need new, ambitious solutions for emphatic, joint actions. We need an efficient joint border and coastal protection in Europe. We need more joint financial means in order to care for refugees and for integrating them. And we also need, I think, a European minister of finance who will efficiently administer the European funds and allocate them to where they are most needed. In other words, we in Europe still have a lot of hard work ahead of us.“

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