Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Schulz fa le scarpe a Gabriel e lo caccia a pedate.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2017-01-26.

Jean-Claude Juncker und Martin Schulz in der Wahlarena

Un certo quale numero di persone suggerirebbe l’idea che Herr Gabriel abbia lasciato spazio ad Herr Schulz per lasciarlo scottarsi con un’urente sconfitta elettorale, per recuperare quindi la guida dell’Spd dopo le elezioni di autunno.

Molte altre persone, nel converso, ritengono che Herr Schulz abbia fatto le scarpe ad Herr Gabriel, cui tutta la Spd imputa il crollo elettorale socialdemocratico.

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Sta di fatto che i due si odiano di un profondo odio viscerale e che faranno quanto loro possibile per danneggiarsi a vicenda.

Si prende atto che adesso Herr Schulz è il capo della socialdemocrazia tedesca e che sarà il candidato di questo partito alla Cancelleria.

Sempre che i politici tedeschi non cambino linea ancora una volta, cosa cui ci hanno abituati negli ultimi tempi, il quadro sarebbe adesso il seguente.

«The nomination followed party leader Sigmar Gabriel’s decision to stand aside for Schulz, a move that shows the SPD is serious about ending its role as a junior partner in Merkel’s current right-left coalition after the Sept. 24 vote»

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«Schulz has taken a tough stance against right-wing populism across Europe and will fight for social justice and democracy»

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«Schulz faces an extremely tough job to oust Merkel, whose conservatives lead the SPD in opinion polls by up to 15 percentage points»

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«The policies of Angela Merkel and (Finance Minister) Wolfgang Schaeuble have no doubt contributed to the deep crises in the EU since 2008, to the isolation of a dominant German government and through a relentless insistence on austerity, to high unemployment outside Germany»

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«The SPD wants to form a coalition with smaller parties on the left but most analysts still think another right-left coalition is the most likely outcome of September’s election.»

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«his pro-European stance makes him vulnerable to attacks from the anti-immigrant and anti-euro Alternative for Germany (AfD) which has made big gains in the last two years, especially due to the migrant crisis»

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«Symbol of EU bureaucracy and a deeply divided Europe as chancellor candidate?»

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La devoluzione socialista che sta caratterizzando questo periodo non esclude sicuramente la Germania.

Le ultime proiezioni del 21 gennaio darebbero la Union al 32.5% (-9), Spd 21% (-4.7), Fpd 7.5% (+2.7), AfD 14.5% (+9.8).

Impossibile un governo delle sinistre, politicamente molto poco probabile una riedizione della Große Koalition. Possibile numericamente ma improbabile politicamente un governo della Union con Linke e Grüne.

Il quadro finale che si delineerebbe sarebbe quello di uno stallo politico.

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AfD ha eroso larga parte dei voti che detiene dalla popolazione dalla Spd, specialmente poi dal comparto produttivo: pochi, pochissimi sono gli appartenenti all’élite.

Proporre Herr Schulz come candidato cancelliere sicuramente soddisfa i problemi interni alla socialdemocrazia, ma la gente comune vede il candidato Spd come il simbolo di un’Europa da ripudiarsi, dell’Unione Europea della immigrazione forzata, del disordine e della criminalità islamica. Ma soprattutto la gente della strada, quelli del “Wir sind das Volk“, vede in Herr Schulz il simbolo della odiata burocrazia europea.

Questa scelta potrebbe quindi rafforzare la già consistente migrazione di voti direttamente dall’Spd ad AfD.


Reuters. 2017-01-25. German SPD chief Gabriel makes way for Schulz to run against Merkel

Germany’s centre-left Social Democrats (SPD) nominated former European Parliament president Martin Schulz on Tuesday as their candidate to run against Angela Merkel for the post of chancellor in September’s national election.

The nomination followed party leader Sigmar Gabriel’s decision to stand aside for Schulz, a move that shows the SPD is serious about ending its role as a junior partner in Merkel’s current right-left coalition after the Sept. 24 vote.

Opinion polls suggest Schulz, 61, has a better chance than Gabriel – though still very small – of unseating the conservative Merkel, who has led Germany since 2005 and is Europe’s most powerful leader. Her grand coalition with the SPD has governed Germany since 2013.

Asked during a news conference at the SPD headquarters in Berlin to explain his decision to make way for Schulz, Gabriel said: “Because he has a better chance”.

Schulz has taken a tough stance against right-wing populism across Europe and will fight for social justice and democracy, Gabriel added.

The party is expected to confirm Schulz’s candidacy as well as his leadership of the party at a meeting on Sunday.

However, Schulz faces an extremely tough job to oust Merkel, whose conservatives lead the SPD in opinion polls by up to 15 percentage points.

“This country needs a new leadership in these difficult times,” Schulz said, warning that European societies were being torn apart by populism.

Earlier, Gabriel made a rare attack on Merkel and her insistence on financial austerity during the euro zone crisis.

“The policies of Angela Merkel and (Finance Minister) Wolfgang Schaeuble have no doubt contributed to the deep crises in the EU since 2008, to the isolation of a dominant German government and through a relentless insistence on austerity, to high unemployment outside Germany,” he said in a statement.

This has boosted anti-European populist parties, he added.

“CLEAR SIGNAL”

The SPD wants to form a coalition with smaller parties on the left but most analysts still think another right-left coalition is the most likely outcome of September’s election.

Senior SPD lawmaker Karl Lauterbach told broadcaster WDR: “This is a clear signal – no grand coalition. With Martin Schulz we have a better chance.”

A poll conducted this month by the Emnid institute for the Bild newspaper showed that in a direct vote Schulz would win 38 percent versus 39 percent for Merkel, compared to a result of 27 percent for Gabriel and 46 percent for Merkel.

Schulz is a committed European. In 2003, Italy’s then-prime minister Silvio Berlusconi caused a storm for jokingly offering Schulz a film part as a concentration camp guard.

As a young man, Schulz had to ditch his aspirations to be a footballer and later became a book seller. He announced in November he would return to German politics after his stint as president of the European Parliament.

However, his pro-European stance makes him vulnerable to attacks from the anti-immigrant and anti-euro Alternative for Germany (AfD)) which has made big gains in the last two years, especially due to the migrant crisis.

“Symbol of EU bureaucracy and a deeply divided Europe as chancellor candidate?” tweeted AfD co-leader Frauke Petry.

Gabriel said he would shortly become German foreign minister, replacing Frank-Walter Steinmeier, who will become the country’s president, a largely ceremonial post.


Deutsche Welle. 2017-01-25. Seven things to know about the Social Democratic shake-up

Martin Schulz is replacing Sigmar Gabriel at the head of the SPD. DW explains how the change affects the current government and Germany’s coming national election and assesses Schulz’s chances of toppling Angela Merkel.

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Who’s in charge of what?

Sigmar Gabriel is resigning in the three-fold sense: as chairman of the center-left Social Democratic Party (SPD), as the presumptive SPD candidate for chancellor against incumbent Angela Merkel and as Economy and Energy Minister. Former EU Parliamentary President Martin Schulz succeeds Gabriel in the first two functions, becoming the new leader of the Social Democrats.

The 62-year-old Brigitte Zypries – a former justice minister and SPD veteran – takes over as Economy Minister for the rest of this legislative period. She plans to give up her Bundestag mandate after the election in September.

Gabriel will become Germany’s new foreign minister, succeeding Frank-Walter Steinmeier. Steinmeier is the joint candidate of Social Democrats and the conservative Christian Democrats (CDU), along with their Bavarian Christian Social Union (CSU) cousins, for the office of German President. Barring a political earthquake, he will take over from Joachim Gauck, when Germany’s Federal Convention convenes on February 12.

Why did Gabriel step down?

Almost everyone expected Gabriel to run against Merkel, but as he himself said when announcing his decision to stand down, he didn’t think he had any chance of beating the popular conservative chancellor.

However, his decision has probably as much to do with his own political career as with the good of the party. Having already declined to run for chancellor once, he couldn’t realistically have remained party chairman had he backed away from challenging Merkel again. But with the SPD mired at around 20 percent support in beginning-of-year polls, that looked like a lost battle. And a massive defeat in September could have been politically fatal for Gabriel.

By becoming foreign minister, he keeps his career alive, and if the result of the election is a continuation of the grand coalition between the conservatives and the SPD, he could stay on in that position. Plus it might improve his poor favorability ratings since foreign ministers are usually popular with the German public.

Will Schulz improve the SPD’s chances?

If you believe the polls, yes. In a battery of surveys of various groups, Schulz dramatically outperformed Gabriel. For example, in a prominent poll head-to-head with Merkel, commissioned by “Bild” newspaper at the beginning of the year, Schulz trailed the chancellor by only a single percentage point, 39 to 38. That compared to 46 percent for Merkel and only 27 percent for Gabriel when they were matched. Other polls showed Schulz further behind Merkel but consistently ahead of Gabriel.

Potential coalition partners also preferred Schulz to Gabriel, and the numbers among party members and traditional SPD voters were similar in polls conducted by the SPD itself. Schulz’s one weakness is the fact that having worked in Brussels until late last year, he’s not as well known to the general public as Gabriel.

Moreover, as someone who is not part of the current grand coalition cabinet, Schulz is free to speak his mind and thus is much better positioned to criticize Merkel than Gabriel would have been. The SPD can now claim more plausibly that it has hit the reboot button and deserves a chance to lead a government.

What will Schulz mean for SPD policy

German candidates for chancellor are much more tightly connected to their parties and party platforms than is the case, for instance, in the United States. So the replacement of Gabriel with Schulz won’t entail a seismic shift in SPD policies.

What it does do is pre-ordain the party’s strategy in terms of internationalism. In elevating Schulz to the top spot, the party is essentially doubling down on its support for a strong European Union. If there was ever any question of the SPD trying to co-opt issues from the anti-EU, anti-immigration populist party, Alternative for Germany (AfD), they are now dead and buried. As a former EU parliamentary president, Schulz is sure to argue that Germany’s interests lie in protecting and strengthening the bloc.

What effect could Schulz have on coalitions?

That all depends on how much the Social Democrats recover under his leadership. The SPD began 2017 some 15 percentage points behind the CDU. It would take a small political miracle for Schulz’s party, together with its potential coalition partners, to wrest control of the government away from Merkel.

But with the AfD expected to eat up 10 to 20 percent of the vote, the CDU may have trouble forming a parliamentary majority as well. If Schulz can increase the SPD’s share of the ballots by a couple percentage points, it could rule out virtually all options except a continuation of the current grand coalition.

Whether that would be in the Social Democrats’ best interest is another question. The SPD has declined to historically low levels of support as the junior members of a governing partnership with Merkel’s CDU.

What do the other parties think of Schulz?

Despite indicating in polls that they preferred Schulz to Gabriel, the Greens and the Left Party – two possible coalition partners – had little good to say about him when his candidacy was announced. That’s not surprising. After all, they want to attract voters for their own agendas and candidates.

The CDU didn’t seem initially very worried about the new challenger. Members of the conservative party sniggered that Schulz candidacy was a “premature birth” – a reference to the hasty announcement of the SPD shake-up on January 24, after Gabriel’s decision leaked to the press.

What do the German media think?

While surprised by the shake-up, most journalistic observers saw the change at the top as the only chance for the SPD to revive a moribund-looking political campaign. Schulz was hailed as a fresher, more combative, more charismatic, closer-to-the-common-man alternative to the sometimes prickly and stuffy Gabriel.

But almost no one believed that Schulz would be able to knock Merkel off her perch. And some in the conservative media characterized Schulz as a representative of the “establishment” and thought his close ties with the EU would come back to haunt him amidst a resurgence of nationalism and popular anger with Brussels.

Annunci