Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Austria. Gli strani effetti dell’Fpö al 47.6%. Vienna alleata del Visegrad.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2016-12-31.

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Peculiare caratteristica dei teutoni e dei socialisti è quella di comprendere come stanno le cose quando sono stati presi a cannonate. Sembrerebbe quasi che senza cannonate, oppure una qualsiasi altra forma coercitiva molto violenta,  il loro encefalo si rifiutasse di funzionare. A seguito di questa caratteristica passano buona parte del loro tempo prima a crogiolarsi nelle loro idee incuranti della realtà, poi, di conseguenza, a piangere sul latte versato. Il caso austriaco è paramount.

Se è vero che in Austria l’Fpö non abbia conquistato la Presidenza, è altrettanto vero che abbia conquistato il 47.6% dei voti. Quanto basta a vedersi assegnata la Cancelleria alle prossime elezioni politiche nazionali.

Drammatica la presa di coscienza dei socialdemocratici al governo.

«Austria says the credibility of the European Union is at stake if it continues to treat Turkey as a potential member»

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«Austria’s foreign minister, Sebastian Kurz, has called for drastic consequences for countries which fail to take back their asylum-seeking citizens»

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«many of countries have no interest in us sending back their citizens»

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«failed deportations of rejected asylum seekers or those who have committed a criminal offense»

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«The money transfers from the refugees from Europe to their home country are an important economic factor»

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«for countries that are unwilling to take back their citizens, the funds for development cooperation must be cut»

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«Vienna has allied itself with the Visegrad group – Poland, Hungary, Slovakia and the Czech Republic – against the EU’s migrant policy»

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Ricapitoliamo.

Quando AfD ed Fpö dicevano che l’Austria avrebbe dovuto allearsi al gruppo Visegrad e prendere posizioni contro i paesi che si fossero rifiutati di riprendersi i migranti dal loro fuggiti furono coralmente tacciati di essere razzisti, xenofobi, nazisti, intolleranti, antislamici e persino omofobi.

Adesso che lo dice il Ministro degli Esteri Herr Sebastian Kurz sono invece cose giuste, sante, probe, amorose nei confronti di migranti ed islamici.

Se i paesi dai quali i migranti sono fuggiti non se li riprendessero, allora basterebbe bloccare le rimesse finanziarie dei migranti verso il paese di origine.

Sono cifre da capogiro, specie se fossero convertite in denaro per potere di acquisto. I 1,150 euro che il migrante percepisce al mese come argent de poche,  vitto ed alloggio a carico del Contribuente, se in Austria non sono gran cifra, nei paesi emergenti sono quasi quattro volte il reddito mediano.

E l’Austria dispone di un voto in seno alla Commissione Europea.

Figurarsi poi cosa accadrà dopo le elezioni politiche olandesi e dopo quelle presidenziali e politiche in Francia.


Deutsche Welle. 2016-12-29. Austrian foreign ministers threatens refugee homelands with severe sanctions

Austria’s foreign minister, Sebastian Kurz, has called for drastic consequences for countries which fail to take back their asylum-seeking citizens. Following the recent Berlin attack, he also called for tighter borders.

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In an interview with German magazine Der Spiegel, the Austrian foreign minister said “many of countries have no interest in us sending back their citizens.”

Severe measures are necessary in order to address the number of  failed deportations of rejected asylum seekers or those who have committed a criminal offense, Kurz said.

‘Less-for-less principle’

According to plans from Vienna, countries that refuse to take back their citizens are expected to receive noticeably less development aid from Europe.

“The money transfers from the refugees from Europe to their home country are an important economic factor,” according to Kurz.

The EU therefore has to act according to the “less-for-less principle,” Kurz said – meaning that those you do less will receive less financially. 

In short, “for countries that are unwilling to take back their citizens, the funds for development cooperation must be cut.” Even the threat would lead to a massive rethink, Kurz told Der Spiegel.

Tighter borders

In light of the recent terror attack on a Berlin Christmas market, the Austrian foreign minister also demanded better security of European external borders.

“If we cannot control who emigrates to the EU and who lives here, that is a security risk,” Kurz said, adding that it would be “fatal to equate refugees with terror.”

On the other hand, he said, it was a mistake to believe that refugees could never become criminals or terrorists.

“I warned a year and a half ago that the refugee routes could also be used by terrorists, which unfortunately proved to be right,” he added.

Visegrad allies

Throughout the refugee crisis, Vienna has allied itself with the Visegrad group – Poland, Hungary, Slovakia and the Czech Republic – against the EU’s migrant policy.

Earlier this year, Austria was also instrumental in the closure of the Balkan route used by migrants to travel to northern Europe after it tightened its border controls and set a ceiling on asylum applications.

As recently as November, Austria also sent 60 troops to Hungary to help build infrastructure along the border with non-EU member Serbia. Defense Minister Hans Peter Doskozil insisted, however, that the soldiers would not be armed, nor involved in intercepting refugees who make it into Hungary after overcoming the fence, rolled out along the Hungarian-Serbian border.


Deutsche Welle. 2016-12-12. Austria threatens to block Turkish accession

Austria says it will send a “clear political signal” that the Turkish government’s crackdown in the wake of the country’s failed coup is unacceptable. Its foreign minister says the EU “must react” to Ankara.

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Austria says the credibility of the European Union is at stake if it continues to treat Turkey as a potential member.  A day before foreign ministers are due to discuss Turkey’s accession negotiations, Austrian Foreign Minister Sebastan Kurz (pictured) demanded the process be stopped.

More terror attacks in Turkey over the weekend led President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to expand his purge of those he accuses of being involved in terrorist activities or the failed coup plot launched against him in July. Hundreds more people, including in particular members of the Kurdish-dominated People’s Democratic Party (HDP), have now been added to the more than 100,000 individuals already dismissed from their jobs, thrown in prison or placed under official supervision. 

Kurz told DW this behavior is just not acceptable. “In Turkey, dissenters are intimidated, journalists and opposition politicians are imprisoned. The death penalty is to be introduced. We as the European Union must react to this,” he explained. “[A]s long as the negotiations are not frozen, the European taxpayer’s money flows into Turkey as a rapprochement support – hundreds of millions of euros each year. I do not know how to justify that.”

Kurz says the bloc should adopt the attitude of the European Parliament, which approved a non-binding measure last month 479 to 37, with 107 abstentions, calling for a suspension of talks due to Ankara’s “disproportionate repressive measures.” He’s prepared to reject last month’s European Commission progress report on Turkey, which would then prevent it being approved by heads of state later this week. That’s a complicated move in itself, as it also would throw Balkan hopefuls into the same delayed status.

Reaction from Kurz’s colleagues Monday was split. Slovak Foreign Minister Miroslav Lajcak, whose country chairs the rotating presidency at the moment, says Tuesday’s discussion will be “not easy.” He disagrees with the Austrian view. “I don’t think we have to stop negotiations,” Lajcak said upon arrival at the meeting. “I believe we need to continue our dialogue with Turkey. Turkey is an important partner.”

Luxembourg’s Jean Asselborn agreed with Lajcak, saying a suspension would not help the Turkish people or stop the government from imposing the death penalty, which is against EU law.  It also won’t help unfreeze the Cyprus issue, Asselborn added.

While not wishing to comment directly on whether the EU should freeze Turkey’s accession process, the NGO Human Rights Watch (HRW) agrees the best way to influence Turkey is stay engaged. “The EU should use its leverage on the issues in a strong, principled way to talk about the human rights crackdown in Turkey,” said HRW’s Turkey Director Emma Sinclair-Webb. “Those are the principles at the heart of the EU.”

Speaking from Istanbul, Sinclair-Webb described life in Turkey as a “climate of fear,” even for those people who are not politically engaged and at risk of being targeted by the government. The latest arrests are very concerning, she said, with months of purging already having created a situation with “the criminal justice system on its knees” and there’s an “onslaught on the media.”

In an October report, HRW highlighted abuses in the police detention system, which has only become more taxed with every name added to a purge list.  Sinclair-Webb said the increasing of “counter-terrorism” powers mean people picked up by the authorities can be held for 30 days without charges and the first five of those without a lawyer.

Talks were ongoing late Monday to find a compromise that would convince Kurz to approve conclusions prepared for the summit. However, he told DW he was fully prepared to stand alone and send a “clear political signal” rather than agree to “positive language… [which] absolutely does not fit the situation in Turkey at the moment.”

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