Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Referendum. Eur/Usd 1.0563, -0.92%. Significato del voto.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2016-12-05.

 reni-guido-san-michele-arcangelo-schiaccia-satana-1636

Aver abbattuto il tiranno non significa essere entrati in un sistema stabile.


«The Italian referendum kicked off a year of voting with establishment parties across Europe threatened by upstarts channeling voters anger at immigration and economic stagnation. French President Francois Hollande last week declined to seek a second term, leaving the Republican Francois Fillon as the main opponent to the anti-European Marine Le Pen.»

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«German Chancellor Angela Merkel will run for a fourth term, with the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany party branding her public enemy no. 1. In Austria, the populists suffered a setback on Sunday when the environmentalist Alexander Van der Bellen defeated Norbert Hofer of the anti-immigrant Freedom Party in a presidential runoff.»

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Per quanti non avessero compreso il profondo significato del brexit, delle elezioni nei Länder tedeschi, dell’elezione di Mr Trump come presidente degli Stati Uniti, del 46.7% conquistato dall’Fpö alle elezioni presidenziali austriache, il risultato del referendum tenutosi ieri in Italia dovrebbe aver aperto gli occhi e sturato le orecchie.

È cambiata un’epoca, ed occorrerebbe prenderne atto.

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Drop dell’euro al giungere dei risultati del referendum.


I Cittadini Elettori europei hanno tolto ogni residua forma di fiducia nella dirigenza che ha guidato, ed in parte continua a guidare in attesa di essere rimossa dalle elezioni, la politica dell’Unione Europea e di molti stati che vi afferiscono.

I Cittadini Elettori europei si sono riappropriati della propria libertà di pensiero e di azione politica e, prossimamente, vorranno riappropriarsi della propria libertà economica.

È in pieno corso in tutto l’Occidente la devoluzione del socialismo ideologico e, con esso, del pensiero unico che aveva cercato di imporre.

Né alle sinistre residue giova poi molto avere ancora dalla loro tutti i media: la gente comune non li sta nemmeno a sentire, perché mentono e mentano in modo molto maldestro. Negando la verità ci si discredita con le proprie mani.

Il “politicamente corretto” altro non è che la maschera di scena della menzogna.

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Per quanti ancora non avessero capito il sommovimento in atto nell’Occidente, ricordiamo solo alcuni topic.

– I Cittadini Elettori sono stufi del pensiero unico, per cui lo stato deve intervenire fin nei minimi dettagli della vita privata della gente;

– I Cittadini Elettori sono arcistufi del “politicamente corretto“, nel cui nome si è trascinati in giudizio per reati di opinione;

– I Cittadini Elettori sono ancora più stanchi della dittatura dell’omofilia, di tutti gli -ismi di marca socialista, e così via;

– I Cittadini Elettori sono stanchi di una cultura della morte, che sta portando l’Occidente alla estinzione per carenza di nascite;

– I Cittadini Elettori ne hanno abbastanza del tentativo di islamizzare l’Europa;

– I Cittadini Elettori sono studi di uno stato che ai arroga il diritto di governare i sistemi economici, diritto che ha usato per portarci tutti alla perdizione di una stagnazione depressiva di portata mai vista;

– I Cittadini Elettori vogliono tornare alle proprie radici religiose, culturali, storiche, politiche: ne hanno a basta di questi negatori cronici dell’evidenza fattuale.

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Non ci si illuda.

La devoluzione socialista è solo all’inizio. Ci saranno periodi di notevole turbolenza politica ed economica.

Le sinistre detengono ancora molte leve di potere, e le useranno tutte spietatamente nel tentativo di sopravvivere.

Aspettiamo quindi tempi entusiasmanti, ci si sta liberando dai tiranni, ma anche durissimi: i socialisti lasciano un deserto etico, morale, ed economico. Sarà dura poter evitare la miseria.

 


Bbc. 2016-12-05. Italy referendum: PM Matteo Renzi resigns after clear referendum defeat

Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi has resigned after suffering a heavy defeat in a referendum over his plan to reform the constitution.

In a late-night news conference, he said he took responsibility for the outcome, and said the No camp must now make clear proposals.

With most ballots counted, the No vote leads with 60% against 40% for Yes.

The turnout was nearly 70%, in a vote that was seen as a chance to register discontent with the prime minister.

“Good luck to us all,” Mr Renzi told reporters. He said he would tell a Cabinet meeting on Monday afternoon that he was resigning, then tender his resignation to the Italian president.

Sleepless nights in Brussels – BBC Europe editor Katya Adler in Rome

EU leaders won’t have slept much on Sunday night. Angst about Italy makes an uncomfortable bedfellow and there’s plenty for them to worry about. Particularly in Brussels. Prime Minister Renzi was the only premier left in Europe with a vision for the EU’s future. Angela Merkel is too busy crisis-managing while much of France is in thrall to Front National eurosceptics.

But Matteo Renzi is no more. The self-styled reformer with his promise to stabilise politics and kick-start the Italian economy has managed quite the reverse.

Italy wakes up on Monday to the threat of a banking crisis, political turmoil, and a group of anti-establishment populists banging on the doors of government. Eurozone beware and EU be warned. Italy is the euro currency’s third largest economy and it’s in for a bumpy ride. And there are more unpredictable votes to come in 2017: in France, Germany the Netherlands and perhaps here in Italy too.

Why did he lose?

Matteo Renzi’s staked his political future on his attempt to change Italy’s cumbersome political system. He wanted to strengthen central government and weaken the Senate, the upper house of parliament.

His opponents – including some within his own party – had argued that the reforms would give the prime minister too much power. The electorate agreed.

But the referendum was more than a vote on constitutional reform, it was widely regarded as a chance to reject establishment politics.

It was a resounding victory for the No camp, a medley of populist parties headed by Five Star Movement, which capitalised on Mr Renzi’s declining popularity, years of economic stagnation, and the problems caused by tens of thousands of migrants arriving in Italy from Africa.

Has this strengthened anti-establishment parties?

The No vote was supported by populist parties whose victory was even bigger than the last opinion poll in November had predicted.

One of them, the Five Star Movement, says it is getting ready to govern Italy now that Mr Renzi is resigning. Its leader Beppe Grillo called for an election to be called “within a week”.

“Starting tomorrow we’ll be at work on a Five Star government,” said Luigi Di Maio, a rising star in the party.

Another opposition leader Matteo Salvini, of the anti-immigrant Northern League, called the referendum a “victory of the people against the strong powers of three-quarters of the world”.

What will happen next?

Mr Renzi will hand in his resignation to President Sergio Mattarella later on Monday, following a final meeting with his cabinet.

The president may ask him to stay on at least until parliament has passed a budget bill due later this month.

In spite of the pressure from the opposition, early elections are thought to be unlikely.

Instead, the president may appoint a caretaker administration led by Mr Renzi’s Democratic Party, which would carry on until an election due in the spring of 2018.

Finance Minister Pier Carlo Padoan is the favourite to succeed Renzi as prime minister.

How will this go down elsewhere in Europe?

So far, there has been little reaction from mainstream politicians.

The Governor of the Bank of France, Francois Villeroy, who is also policymaker for the European Central Bank, put a brave face on it.

“The referendum in Italy yesterday may be deemed as another source of uncertainty,” he said. “However, it cannot be compared to the British referendum: Italian people have been called to the polls to vote on an internal constitutional matter, and not on Italy’s long-standing EU membership.”

But the leader of far-right Front National in France, Marine Le Pen, tweeted her congratulations to the Northern League.

“The Italians have disavowed the EU and Renzi. We must listen to this thirst for freedom of nations,” she said.

What will it do to the economy?

Markets seemed to have taken Mr Renzi’s departure in their stride. Stocks and the euro fell in early trading in Asia but there were no signs of panic, as the possibility of his resignation had already been factored in.

But the referendum result could have longer-term implications.

There have been growing concerns over financial stability in the eurozone’s third largest economy.

Italy’s economy is 12% smaller than when the financial crisis began in 2008.

The banks remain weak and the country’s debt-to-GDP ratio, at 133%, is second only to Greece’s.

With Mr Renzi gone, and populist parties on the rise, the question is whether Italy can keep a lid on the problems.

 


Bloomberg. 2016-12-05. Renzi Quits as Italy Referendum Defeat Deepens Europe’s Turmoil

– Italy prime minister says he takes all responsibility for loss

– Euro drops more than 1% on political risks for Europe

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Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi quit in the early hours of Monday after losing a referendum he’d called to push through constitutional changes, threatening renewed political and financial turmoil for Europe.

Opponents of Renzi’s proposal to rein in the power of the senate won Sunday’s referendum by 60 percent to 40 percent, with almost all votes counted. Renzi said he’ll turn in his resignation to President Sergio Mattarella later in the day and signaled that he won’t stay on to help stabilize a caretaker administration. The euro fell to a 20-month low.

“In Italian politics, no one ever wins,” Renzi told supporters, his voice breaking and a tear on his cheek as he thanked his wife for her support. “I did everything I thought possible in this phase, but we were not convincing.”

The 41-year-old premier became the second European leader this year to be toppled by a populist revolt that is propelling Donald Trump into the White House and Britain out of the European Union. The result leaves Mattarella seeking a new government chief who can provide a firebreak against the insurgents; polls show an early election would see the anti-euro Five Star Movement swept into power.

A survey by EMG released Sunday showed Five Star winning a second-round ballot by 53 percent to 47 percent against Renzi’s Democratic Party and by 57 percent to 43 percent against the center-right bloc. Five Star had demanded a snap election if Renzi is defeated as it looks to force another referendum — this time on taking Italy out of the euro.

Still, a poll last month showed only 15.2 percent favored leaving the single currency and 67.4 percent were self-described single-currency believers.

Who’s Next?

Possible successors who might be asked to lead a caretaker government include Finance Minister Pier Carlo Padoan, Senate Speaker Pietro Grasso and Culture Minister Dario Franceschini. The country’s mainstream parties have been preparing contingency plans to ensure a government would keep functioning if Renzi was forced out.

The result is “a negative outcome for both political stability and the economy in Italy,” said Wolfango Piccoli, co-president of research firm Teneo Intelligence. “However, it will not pave the way for immediate worst-case scenarios such as snap elections.”

Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA will be in focus when trading opens Monday. The lender is in the middle of a 5 billion-euro ($5.3 billion) capital raising. Its stock has fallen 83 percent this year and a third of its loan book has soured.

Italian bonds may feel a shock too. They rallied in the final days of the campaign, with the spread between the country’s 10-year debt and similar dated German bunds narrowed by 24 basis points to 162 points.

Europe Votes

The Italian referendum kicked off a year of voting with establishment parties across Europe threatened by upstarts channeling voters anger at immigration and economic stagnation. French President Francois Hollande last week declined to seek a second term, leaving the Republican Francois Fillon as the main opponent to the anti-European Marine Le Pen.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel will run for a fourth term, with the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany party branding her public enemy no. 1. In Austria, the populists suffered a setback on Sunday when the environmentalist Alexander Van der Bellen defeated Norbert Hofer of the anti-immigrant Freedom Party in a presidential runoff.

Renzi’s Farewell

Renzi campaigned intensively for weeks to in an attempt to salvage his plans to reform Italy. He traveled across the country and used Facebook Live sessions to push home his message that the reform would bring more stable government to Italy, a country which has seen 63 administrations since World War II.

In his referendum campaign, the former mayor of Florence had sought to line up against the elites. He argued that the reform would land a blow against the ruling class which he said has paralyzed Italy for decades, and insisted he was different from Roman politicians. It wasn’t enough.

“I have lost,” Renzi said in a televised statement. “I wanted to get rid of jobs for the boys in politics, and it’s my job that is going.”

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