Pubblicato in: Criminalità Organizzata, Devoluzione socialismo, Unione Europea

Germania. Spd propone legge sui migranti.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2016-11-10.

 German Chancellor Merkel talks with Economy Minister Gabriel during the weekly cabinet meeting at the Chancellery in Berlin

Si sta avvicinando il tempo elettorale e la socialdemocrazia tedesca inizia l’usuale trasformismo preelettorale, avanzando una proposta di legge sulla immigrazione che ribalta le posizioni finora tenute.

«The SPD has unveiled proposals to streamline immigration and set targets for attracting skilled foreigners»

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«The draft legislation the Social Democrats premiered on Monday in Berlin would set the initial target for third-country (i.e. non-EU, non-refugee) immigrants seeking highly qualified jobs in Germany at 25,000»

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«Germany faces the demographic challenge of a rapidly aging society and must compete, particularly against English-speaking countries, to attract highly qualified migrants»

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«of some 14,000 work and resident permits issued in recent years to qualified third-country immigrants, only 5,900 had been taken up»

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«those with concrete job offers from Germany would effectively jump to the top of the list of 25,000»

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«Without a job offer, it’s almost impossible to get selected in the system in Canada. … The bar is set very high; only few people succeed. If people have a job, they almost certain to be admitted, and if they don’t, they’re almost certain to be left outside»

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«Twenty-five thousand is a tiny figure compared to the net number of migrants Germany has received since the massive refugee influx started in 2014»

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Ricapitoliamo.

– Che la Germania avesse bisogno di milioni di immigrati non era cosa vera.

– 25,000 immigrati all’anno sono più che sufficienti.

Blue-Chip tedesche non assumeranno più di 100 migranti sul milione arrivato.

– Alla Germania non serve un’immigrazione di basso profilo professionale: ha bisogno di figure altamente specializzate.

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Quando dice queste cose Pegida o Alternative für Deutschland sono bollati essere nazisti, razzisti, xenofobi, estrema destra, omofobi ed enti-femministi. Persino codini.

Adesso che le dice Herr Gabriel questi sono ragionamenti politicamente corretti, perfettamente coerenti e socialmente avanzati.

Sembrerebbe essere una situazione di due pesi e due misure.


Deutsche Welle. 2016-11-08. Social Democrats present draft for new immigration law

The SPD has unveiled proposals to streamline immigration and set targets for attracting skilled foreigners. But a leading immigration expert says a law alone won’t solve Germany’s demographic dilemma.

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The draft legislation the Social Democrats premiered on Monday in Berlin would set the initial target for third-country (i.e. non-EU, non-refugee) immigrants seeking highly qualified jobs in Germany at 25,000. Candidates’ attractiveness would be measured according to a system of points awarded for having a concrete job offer, possessing desired qualifications and being able to speak German.

Parliamentary leader Thomas Oppermann boasted that his party was the first to put forward comprehensive immigration legislation and said he hoped that the SPD and its senior coalition partners, the conservative Christian Democrats, could pass a law before German national elections next September.

Germany faces the demographic challenge of a rapidly aging society and must compete, particularly against English-speaking countries, to attract highly qualified migrants.

“We have to work at being attractive,” Oppermann said. “For well-educated immigrants, Germany is by no means the most attractive country.”

Oppermann pointed out that of some 14,000 work and resident permits issued in recent years to qualified third-country immigrants, only 5,900 had been taken up. That may be down to the often bewildering varieties of rules and regulations in a country that possesses more than 50 different types of residence permits.

“No one in Germany knows how the system works, let alone anyone outside the country,” said SPD legal spokesman Burkhard Lischka.

The draft legislation is modeled on a points system in place in Canada, and in the first instance, the big winners look to be those third-country nationals who succeed in getting offers for work from Germany while still abroad.

Old opportunities, new package

Lischka said that those with concrete job offers from Germany would effectively jump to the top of the list of 25,000. That’s in keeping with the Canadian model.

“Without a job offer, it’s almost impossible to get selected in the system in Canada,” Orkan Kösemen, an immigration expert at the Bertelsmann Foundation, told DW. “The bar is set very high; only few people succeed. If people have a job, they almost certain to be admitted, and if they don’t, they’re almost certain to be left outside.”

But the vast majority of the net 1.1 million immigrants to Germany in 2015, Kösemen points out, are either political refugees allowed in for humanitarian reasons or European Union citizens who enjoy freedom of movement throughout the bloc. The law would not apply to either group.

In 2012, Germany introduced the so-called “blue card,” modeled on the American green card, that allows highly qualified third-country nationals with employment offers to settle in the Federal Republic. In fact, Germany issues far and away the largest number of blue cards in the EU. Kösemen says that to a degree the SPD legislation merely repackages existing opportunities for foreigners with needed expertise.

“The rules concerning people who want to immigrate to Germany to work have greatly opened up in the past ten years,” Kösemen said. “The instruments are there, but the government didn’t really beat the drum to draw attention to them. If you say you want more highly qualified immigrants than the people who apply for the blue card, you have to arrange your points system so that the hurdles are lower than is currently the case. I don’t see that.”

What’s also needed is better publicity.

“The blue card is very good for the people concerned, but the demand isn’t there, ” Kösemen said. ” It misses its target audience. The emigrants from the EU don’t need it, and the people from non-EU countries usually prefer to immigrate to English-speaking countries. The opportunity is there, but too few people take advantage of it.”

A forward-looking initiative

There is broad consensus in Germany that the country needs to attract more highly qualified immigrants, but the infrastructure isn’t necessarily in place to achieve that aim. The Federal Office of Statistics, for instance, doesn’t keep a separate tally for the number of third-country nationals immigrating for employment reasons.

Still, Kösemen thinks that the mere act of annually proposing a desired number of highly qualified immigrants is a step in the right direction for a country which has only recently become comfortable with the idea that immigration is a crucial element of German culture and German demographics.

“It would be good for the government to say: This number is our goal for attracting people,” Kösemen argues. “It’s the same in Canada where the government is transparent about the number of immigrants it wants every year.”

Twenty-five thousand is a tiny figure compared to the net number of migrants Germany has received since the massive refugee influx started in 2014. Kösemen thinks that if the waves of refugees relent, political parties will push to admit more highly qualified third-country immigrants. But he says there are limits to what the SPD proposal – or any legislation – can accomplish.

“This is a forward-looking initiative that’s probably aimed at the time after the refugee crisis is over, and that’s very welcome,” Kösemen told DW. “But it’s not the case that Germany will be able to steer immigration the way Canada does. That’s impossible.”


Reuters. 2016-11-08. Germany’s Social Democrats press for new points-based immigration rules

Germany’s Social Democratic Party (SPD), junior partner in Chancellor Angela Merkel’s ruling coalition, will announce a plan on Monday for a points-based system to regulate immigration, a top party official said.

Thomas Oppermann, who leads the Social Democrats in the Bundestag, Germany’s parliament, said the goal was to pass the new law governing migration by skilled workers from outside the European Union before national elections in September 2017.

“The core of the law is a point system modeled on the Canadian system,” Oppermann told the newspaper Bild am Sonntag. The law would not change rules on refugees and migrants applying for asylum in Germany, he said.

Oppermann said the plan would assess immigration applications based on age, education, work experience, language skills and ability to integrate into German society, with a target of allowing 25,000 immigrants to enter in the first year.

The proposal comes as Germany reassesses its immigration policies after the influx of nearly 900,000 migrants last year, most fleeing war and violence in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, and struggles to fill jobs given its aging workforce.

German businesses are having trouble finding skilled workers despite the influx of migrants, most of whom must first learn German before entering the labor market.

The targeted number of skilled migrants would be re-evaluated each year, depending on the needs of the German labor market, Oppermann told the newspaper. Migrants who earn enough to support a family would be allowed to bring spouses and children. But migrants accepted under the new scheme would be excluded from receiving welfare and other social benefits for the first five years after entering Germany, unless they had paid in enough contributions.

Economy ministers from all 16 German states view integration of migrants into the labor market as an opportunity to tackle skill shortages, the Tagesspiegel newspaper reported, citing a survey of the ministers.

The paper quoted Joerg Felgner, economy minister for the state of Saxony-Anhalt, as saying that regions and cities had to combat anti-migrant sentiment to attract migrants as workers.

“As long as migrant homes are being torched and anti-migrant slogans are being flung around marketplaces and parliaments, the foreign workers we urgently need will give a wide berth to our state and eastern Germany as a whole,” said Felgner.

Merkel said last year Germany needed to learn from its mistakes in dealing with “Gastarbeiter” or guest workers in the post-war period and integrate refugees and asylum seekers from the moment they arrive in the country.

Her government has been under fire for its “open door” refugee policy, with her Christian Democrats suffering losses in a series of regional elections as voters switch to the anti-immigration Alternative for Germany (AfD) party.

The SPD’s public support dropped one percentage point to 22 percent – its lowest rating in three months – in a new poll conducted by the Emnid group for the Bild am Sonntag newspaper.

Merkel’s Christian Democrats remained in the lead with 34 percent, with the AfD getting 12 percent, the pro-environment Green party 11 percent, the Left party 10 percent and the libertarian Free Democratic Party five percent.

German unemployment fell more than expected in October, pushing down the jobless rate in Europe’s biggest economy to 6.0 percent, the lowest level since German reunification in 1990, and the number of job vacancies to a record high of 691,000.

Experts estimate Germany’s working age population, whose pension contributions support a growing number of retirees, will shrink by up to 6 million by 2030.

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