Pubblicato in: Devoluzione socialismo, Geopolitica Europea, Pagliacci

Germania. Arriva la sinistra xenofoba e razzista, anti-islamica.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2016-05-30.

 Das Brandenburger Tor in Berlin

Non fanno più i comunisti di una volta. I Feliks Ėdmundovič Dzeržinskij, Nikolaj Ivanovič Ežov, Lavrentij Pavlovič Berija, Genrich Grigor’evič Jagoda e tutta l’allegra compagnia che percepisce lo stipendio il 20 del mese, tanto per intenderci.

Quelli facevano e poi, ma mica sempre, parlavano.

Se ci fossero loro a guidare il German Left Party, quello che i tedeschi si ostinano a chiamare Die Linke, altro che passare ad AfD: in quattro e quattro otto avrebbero preso di notte tutti i musulmani tedeschi e li avrebbero fatti fuori, non uno escluso. Aggiungendovi per buon peso anche Frau Merkel.

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Il fatto.

«[Mr. Gysi] is angry that his party has allowed the insurgent far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) to poach from what he sees as the Left’s natural voter base – the working classes – especially in formerly communist eastern Germany»

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«In a new poll for the eastern state of Brandenburg, the AfD has leapfrogged the Left, jumping seven points to 20 percent to claim third place behind the Social Democrats and the Christian Democratic Union»

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«Meanwhile, in Berlin and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, two states holding elections in September, the AfD and the Left are now virtually neck and neck»

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«in Berlin and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, two states holding elections in September, the AfD and the Left are now virtually neck and neck»

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«Gysi professed himself “shocked, that the poor, the disenfranchised, the workers are voting for the AfD,”»

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«We’re no longer the protest party in the East»

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«Germany should effectively disregard the Geneva convention on refugees’ rights, proved an open goal for the AfD, whose deputy leader Alexander Gauland, expressed his joy that, “the Left now sees this just like the AfD.”»

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«We’re no longer the protest party in the East»

Già. Il Brandenburg è sempre stato un voivodato della sinistra. La Linke perde consensi, e questi transitano ad Alternative für Deutschland, che ha già raggiunto il 20% nei sondaggi. Ma quadro simile nel Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, dove si voterà a settembre, subito dopo Berlino. Se l’Spd perde 16 punti percentuali, la Linke ne perde almeno tre, mentre la solita Alternative für Deutschland fa il pieno con il 18%.

Socialdemocratici e comunisti ortodossi stanno defezionando i vecchi partiti per confluire in Alternative für Deutschland, che si conferma ogni giorno che passa il partito dei lavoratori, delle masse povere se non misere della Germania.

Un fenomeno simile a quanto sta succedendo in Austria, ove l’FPOe raccoglie oltre il settanta per cento dei suffragi tra gli umili lavoratori manuali.

Già, tra quei poveracci che sgobbano alla produzione per mantenere i burocrati statali.

Oramai i partiti di sinistra sono diventati i partiti dei dipendenti delle pubbliche amministrazioni e di quanti lucrano indebitamente sullo stato: sono la nuova edizione della nobiltà, i più retrivi dei conservatori.

Speriamo, anche se non ci crediamo, che bastino le elezioni a scalzarli dai loro privilegi.


Nota.

«The party is likely to lose votes, especially in East Germany, to the AfD, which has been gaining momentum since the onset of the refugee crisis last year. A large number of voters, who previously gave their vote to Die Linke as a form of protest against old-established politics, are expected to defect to the newly-formed rightwing party.» [Fonte]

La Linke ha preso posizione contro l’immigrazione islamica in Germania per frenare l’emorragia dei voti a favore di AfD.

Immediata la reazione:

Germania. Torte in faccia a parlamentari della sinistra. [Foto]

 

Deutsche Welle. 2016-05-26. Right-wing AfD poaching voters from German Left Party

Gregor Gysi is not happy. The hugely popular Left party veteran, who stepped down as parliamentary leader last year, has condemned his successors as “marrowless and feeble” ahead of this weekend’s party conference in Magdeburg.

The 68-year-old Gysi, who remains one of the Left’s most high-profile and charismatic MPs, is angry that his party has allowed the insurgent far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) to poach from what he sees as the Left’s natural voter base – the working classes – especially in formerly communist eastern Germany.

In a new poll for the eastern state of Brandenburg, the AfD has leapfrogged the Left, jumping seven points to 20 percent to claim third place behind the Social Democrats and the Christian Democratic Union. Meanwhile, in Berlin and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, two states holding elections in September, the AfD and the Left are now virtually neck and neck.

Vying for the same voters

Gysi professed himself “shocked, that the poor, the disenfranchised, the workers are voting for the AfD,” in an interview with local media network “RND.” “We’re no longer the protest party in the East – more in the West.”

The old firebrand’s critique also extended to the party’s handling of the refugee crisis, suggesting that his party had failed to speak to those voters most vulnerable to an influx of potentially cheap labor into the country. “The welcome culture was right,” Gysi said, but the party should have shown they were fighting for better job offers for Germany’s underclass. “And we should have made clever suggestions for integration,” he said.

But Gysi, one of the German left’s most influential figures in the aftermath of the reunification and the collapse of communism in the East, remained mindful of party unity – and stopped short of criticizing his successor, Sahra Wagenknecht, directly.

In the aftermath of the New Year’s Eve sexual assaults in Cologne in January, Wagenknecht triggered much internal party dissent when she said, “Whoever abuses their guest’s rights has also forfeited their guest’s rights.” The remark, which suggested Germany should effectively disregard the Geneva convention on refugees’ rights, proved an open goal for the AfD, whose deputy leader Alexander Gauland, expressed his joy that, “the Left now sees this just like the AfD.”

Wagenknecht took back the remark a few days later – though she has raised the issue again when it came to caps on refugee numbers. An interview she gave to the “Berliner Kurier” in March, was headlined with a quote: “Not all the refugees can come.”

That again caused an internal party kerfuffle, with the Left’s chairwoman Katja Kipping distancing herself from her colleague, and feeling the need to reiterate the Left’s official policy: “We work on the underlying assumption that there is a basic right to asylum. And that we reject all upper limits,” Kipping said at the time. “We have shared this position widely. And that is the position of the party that I represent. And the other thing, one has to say, is not the position of the party.”

A common candidate?

But Gysi, whose retirement has perhaps not been quite complete enough for some party colleagues, has other ideas that haven’t gone down well with Wagenknecht. In another recent interview, he suggested that his party should join the Social Democrats and the Greens to back a common candidate to challenge Angela Merkel at next year’s general election.

This “red-red-green” candidate would, he said, represent “a real alternative” to voters, and likely be more effective than the SPD’s Sigmar Gabriel. Gabriel, currently vice-chancellor to Merkel and the man most likely to stand as his party’s candidate in 2017, is struggling for credibility as the SPD has stagnated as a junior partner in Merkel’s coalition.

Of course, Gysi argued, the three left-wing parties would have to find common ground on some basic points – weapons exports, wars, precarious job opportunities, pensions and ecological sustainability. “Everyone is fighting for themselves, but on these questions we could be united,” said Gysi.

But Wagenknecht comprehensively doused the idea on Thursday – and sent irritated barbs Gysi’s way. “For years we have offered the SPD and the Greens cooperation on the restoration of the social welfare state and a peaceful foreign policy,” she told the “WAZ” media group. “But a common chancellor candidate with parties who still stand for dismantling the welfare state, poverty pensions, precarious jobs, TTIP, and weapons exports to war zones – that really would make the Left narrowless and feeble.”

 

Deutsche Welle. 2015-10-13. Germany’s socialist Left party enters new era as Gysi steps down

The famous German leftist Gregor Gysi has passed the torch to the new leaders of the Left parliamentary faction, Sahra Wagenknecht and Dietmar Bartsch. Gysi’s successors aim to bridge divides within the party.

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Members of the largest opposition party in the German parliament, the socialist Left, elected the new parliamentary chiefs in a milestone vote on Tuesday.

The 46-year old Sahra Wagenknecht and 57-year old Dietmar Bartsch are taking over from Gregor Gysi, the party’s famous firebrand.

Gysi held the top position between 1990 and 2000, and came back to it again in 2005. His decision not to run again raised concerns over divisions in the party. But both the new leaders represents a political wing within the organization that succeeded the communist party that governed East Germany.

Unity and conflict

While Bartsch has a reputation for being progressive and pushing for the party to participate in government, Wagenknecht sides with the hardliners who have deep suspicions about alliances with Germany’s mainstream parties.

In addition, the younger Wagenknecht is recognized as the better public speaker and talk-show guest, while Bartsch is considered a better strategist.

Speaking before the Tuesday vote, Bartsch said he expects differences with his co-head Wagenknecht.

“We will not be united on every point,” he told “Radio Eins,” but added that the leaders agree on “90 percent of the issues,” including social and health issues.

“There is no difference there,” he said.

‘New part’ of life

The outgoing parliamentary leader Gysi also expressed his confidence that his successors will be able to work together, as long as they “search for and find a compromise for the party and the faction.”

Talking to his colleagues from the parliament, the 67-year old Gysi stated that he “never regretted” his decision to step down.

“I am glad that I have the strength for a new part of my life,” he said.

At the same time, Gysi remained the party members that he is only saying goodbye “in one sense of the world” and that he will still be active as a member of the parliament.

“I am staying right here,” he said.