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Germania. 12 milioni di indigenti.

Giuseppe Sandro Mela.

2016-04-20.

2016-4-19__Germania__001

 

«A new report by German charities says that more than 12 million people living in Germany are impoverished. These people have so little income that they live on the margins of society. Especially the number of needy pensioners has increased.»

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«On Tuesday, Germany’s Federal Statistics Office released figures showing that 1.038 million people were receiving basic security benefits at the end of last year»

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«The current generation of pensioners in Germany are the wealthiest of all time. But younger generations aren’t in a great position to save for retirement»

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«From 2030 on, one in two retired Germans will be in danger of slipping below the poverty line»

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«rates are so low at the moment that saving just isn’t worth it»

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«But beware: It’s only a matter of time until the next crash! The risk of severe losses if housing prices were to fall again is high»

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La Germania ha un pil pro capite di 46,268.64$. La soglia di povertà, che tiene conto di molti fattori, si aggira attorno ai 12,000$, mentre quella di miseria attorno ai 6,000$.

Ad una analisi superficiale potrebbe sembrare impossibile che dodici milioni di tedeschi siano impoveriti e che oltre un milione necessiti di sussidi di stato per la mera sopravvivenza.

Il problema è strutturale, ed è quello tipico delle strutture statali socialiste.

(1). Chi è dentro il sistema, a qualsiasi titolo, gode di una iperprotezione e di un welfare molto generoso. Chi invece fosse fuori dal sistema sarebbe meno di un paria: nessuna protezione e scarno welfare.

(2). Due le categorie particolarmente penalizzate: i giovani ed gli anziani a bassa pensione che subiscono un qualche evento straordinario.

(3). Se è vero che il tasso di disoccupazione giovanile è basso, è altrettanto vero che la gran quota dei giovani lavora con miniarbeit. Il Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales riporta come l’emolumento possa variare dai 450 agli 850 euro al mese, lordi. In Germania i titolari di «mini-job» sono un esercito: più di otto milioni di persone, il 25 per cento dei dipendenti.

Definire “occupati” i titolari di miniarbeit è impresa che può riuscire solo ad un burocrate di lungo corso: crederci conferisce la patente di gonzo.

(4). Gran quota dei titolari di miniarbeit sono esentati dal versare contributi previdenziali, quelli che li versano hanno un monte contributivo misero, che al massimo potrebbe assicurar loro una pensione minima.

(5). Si profila quindi non solo una generazione bruciata nella sua giovinezza e nella fase adulta, ma che sarà infine massacrata al momento in cui potrebbe o dovrebbe andare in pensione.

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Questo è il risultato finale del welfare state, della visione socialista che lo ha imposto.

È una mostruosa ingiustizia.

E chi è ingiusto è anche ipocrita. Leggete la frase che segue.

«Or into top-of-the-line yachts for the growing number of billionaires. The 62 richest people in the world own as much as the poorest 3.5 billion. That’s outrageous.».

No.

Non è oltraggioso che vi siano ricchi e straricchi: buon per loro e per l’agente delle tasse. Senza ricchi, ossia ricchezza concentrata, non sarebbero possibili gli investimenti produttivi.

Grida invece vendetta a Dio ed agli uomini che vi siano dei miseri e dei poveri in numero così elevato.

Una Collettività giusta non immiserisce i ricchi: fa sì invece che i poveri emergano dalla povertà all’agiatezza.

Nota.

 

Deutsche Welle. 2016-04-19. Number of people needing state help in Germany at record high.

A growing number of people in Germany require state help to compensate for earnings shortfalls because of age or illness, the statistics office reports. More than a million people were receiving the benefits as of 2015.

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On Tuesday, Germany’s Federal Statistics Office released figures showing that 1.038 million people were receiving basic security benefits at the end of last year – the highest number since the benefits were introduced in 2003 and 3.5 percent more than in 2014.

Anyone over the age of 18 who is unable to work more than three hours a day under normal working conditions, and those whose age pensions are inadequate to live on, are eligible for the benefits.

The statistics office reported that more than half of the recipients – about 536,000 people – are senior citizens, while around 502,000 receive the benefits because they have reduced earning capacity following illnesses or disabilities.

At the end of 2003, the year the measure was introduced, fewer than half a million people drew this form of state support.

Rising retirement age

It is still unclear whether the increase in numbers is larger than the growth in the aged population in Germany, as no current population statistics are available.

The age at which Germans born after 1947 can claim the benefits has been rising in tandem with the retirement age since January 2012. Currently, the age of eligibility is 65 years and four months. The final envisaged age of retirement is 67.

Those born before 1947 have been eligible since the age of 65.

 

 

Deutsche Welle. 2016-04-19. Poverty report paints alarming picture. [Video]

A new report by German charities says that more than 12 million people living in Germany are impoverished. These people have so little income that they live on the margins of society. Especially the number of needy pensioners has increased.

 

Deutsche Welle. 2016-04-19. Opinion: Poor young, poor old.

The current generation of pensioners in Germany are the wealthiest of all time. But younger generations aren’t in a great position to save for retirement. And that’s unlikely to change, says DW’s Manuela Kasper-Claridge.

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Imagine that you’re 35 years old and just beginning to think about financial planning for the future. You’d like to do some travelling, maybe buy a car, and have some cash left to slip your grandchildren a few bucks every now and then.

Forget it. All that’s just an illusion. Your grandkids are going to be supporting you! That’s the bitter reality. From 2030 on, one in two retired Germans will be in danger of slipping below the poverty line. That’s according to a recent study by the German state broadcaster Westdeutscher Rundfunk. Pensions won’t be high enough to maintain a good standard of living. After 2030, monthly pensions will amount to just about 43.5 percent of the average wage a worker earned over his or her entire career.

These days, saving isn’t easy

That’s how the state plans to say “Thank you” after all those years of hard work. This isn’t only upsetting, it’s infuriating. What kind of country takes so much from the plates of its youngest generations, only to give out table scraps to the elderly?

However, you don’t feel like getting angry. Instead, you tell yourself, “Then I’ll just save my money, or put some money aside for the future.” But there’s one problem. If you’re 35 and only just beginning to save, you’re going to find yourself up against some pretty unfavorable interest rates. In fact, rates are so low at the moment that saving just isn’t worth it. With interest rates of 2 percent, you’d have to save three times as much than if those rates were at 5 percent – if you’re looking to secure a steady income for your retirement.

If pensioners are being hoodwinked, then younger generations and savers are being conned. It’s been said that the level of wealth in our society is steadily rising. So where’s all the money going? Ah yes, into offshore companies exposed by the Panama Papers revelations. Or into top-of-the-line yachts for the growing number of billionaires. The 62 richest people in the world own as much as the poorest 3.5 billion. That’s outrageous.

If there’s one thing the state doesn’t like, it’s cold, hard cash

So what can be done? Well, we could all go out, withdraw a bunch of money from ATMs and stash it in our pillows. That’s one option. At least we’d know exactly how much we have and would have constant access to it. That may sound silly, but a lot of retirees out there are already doing it – and they’ll likely advise their grandchildren to do the same.

Cash is, in fact, in demand despite increasing digitalization. Cash is needed – and hoarded – all over the world, whether in India, the United States or Germany. The Swiss have already limited the amount of francs depositors can withdraw from ATMs. The reason is that cash payments aren’t easily tracked. It’s not only banks that are interested in where you’re spending your money. The state wants to know too so it can claim as much tax revenue as possible.

Is anything safe anymore?

Such a starting point for saving would intimidate and discourage any 35-year-old person. He or she only wanted to stuff some money into a pillowcase to ensure there’s some left over for when he or she stops working. But even that won’t help against sleepless nights. Just think of the rising number of burglaries. There’s simply not enough money to protect everyone.

Alright, says our 35-year-old protagonist: “I’ll just go and buy some real estate. With interest rates so low, it could be worth it. Loans are seldom as cheap as they are now. But beware: It’s only a matter of time until the next crash! The risk of severe losses if housing prices were to fall again is high.

Alas, for eventual pensioners, there’s only one thing to do: Get ready for tough times ahead.

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